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Reflection of Longs Peak
Reflection of Longs Peak
paganini


Photograph Information Photographer's Comments
Camera: Canon EOS-10D
Location: RMNP, Colorado
Galleries: Landscape
Date Uploaded: Jul 11, 2003

Viewed: 231
Comments: 7
Favorites: 0

I think this is Nymph lake... Rocky Mountain National Park on a cloudy day, 20-35mm lens used with polarizer.

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AuthorThread
01/08/2004 11:34:58 AM
Stunning scene and well shot.

I'd lose the copyright tag though which spoils it and PS could remove it effectively anyway if anyone is so inclined to steal your shot.
07/23/2003 01:48:40 AM
Why does the G2 at F8 have more dof than 10D at f16? It's, however, your next sentence that i meant. Sometimes you want definition from foreground to far background for the shot to work and have the most impact. Actually, with mountains in the background, that's often the case.
It's this shot i was thinking of yesterday when i took those shots of the baby seal. Remember the other oops-shot from the other day of bay/Bellingham/Mt Baker? Actually, that was pretty much the background for the baby seal shots. I thought it would have been a spectacular shot of having that seal (but sharp :) on the rock in the bay and be able to see the city and the mountains clearly in the distance. Trust me, i tried. Even if i had been able to come closer to the seal, there would have been too much blur for the shot to work.
Similarly, yesterday, i took some shots, mainly unposed, of a Native American girl standing in the water (will put them in my portfolio tomorrow or so). I tried to put her in the context of the beautiful landscape. Well, it's somewhat akin to you saying to 'find an interesting foreground for the beautiful landscape behind'. But i think i ended up with some unsatisfactory hybrids that are neither sharp portrait nor landscape. So, some of those shots i ended up cropping just to end up with half decent 'portraits' but that's not what i was after. I just think i made the wrong decision and should have gone for the girl and forget about the landscape behind her.
  Photographer found comment helpful.
07/21/2003 05:41:43 PM
Actually, believe it or not Journey, the Canon G2 at F8 will have more DOF than 10D at F16 :) Seriously. However, diffraction doesn't occur for 10D until past F16, while diffraction for G2 is probably around F6.5, so you get more blurring effect due to that.

This photo can only be taken midday such as this during a cloudy day. Otherwise, things will start to get blown out of highlights. I could make the photograph darker but it will make the photograph darker, i sacrificed the log for a bit more contrast later on. The viewer however will probably focus on the logs, as it has diagonal elements AND horizontal elements.

A general rule for landscape photography is that you find an interesting FOREGROUND element for the beautiful landscape BEHIND it :) basically the generic rule. It can be rocks, flowers, fences, whatever. This image would not be interesting if i had just shot the reflection and the mountain, i think.

yeah, wish I had gotten up early enough and clear day for alpine glow........ cloudy day will have to do for now.


Originally posted by Journey:

Notice that, ggg, the D10 goes to F16! Sure makes for a lot of difference in the depth of an image as you can clearly see here. In western WA, even outside the mountains, you often have the same weather conditions: overcast or cloudy and yet bright (this combination drives me nuts). That probably accounts why that one branch/log near the notice is blown out somewhat (would burn it a little).
This is indeed a very impressive photograph. Yet, i have some trouble relating to it (have seen it a few times now) and don't quite know why that is. Perhaps because it consists mainly of cold colors? My eye likes to linger on the logs most in the foreground and they happen to have the most warm tones. ???
07/20/2003 07:08:05 PM
Notice that, ggg, the D10 goes to F16! Sure makes for a lot of difference in the depth of an image as you can clearly see here. In western WA, even outside the mountains, you often have the same weather conditions: overcast or cloudy and yet bright (this combination drives me nuts). That probably accounts why that one branch/log near the notice is blown out somewhat (would burn it a little).
This is indeed a very impressive photograph. Yet, i have some trouble relating to it (have seen it a few times now) and don't quite know why that is. Perhaps because it consists mainly of cold colors? My eye likes to linger on the logs most in the foreground and they happen to have the most warm tones. ???
  Photographer found comment helpful.
07/14/2003 07:49:48 PM
Thanks! I took this without a tripod, it was quite bright outside even in the clouds, probably using F16 aperature, 20-35mm lens.... I'd guess that my shutter speed is probably around 1/60, which more than sufficient @ 20 mm.

07/11/2003 05:19:56 PM
oops...read the lens part...how about the camera settings?
  Photographer found comment helpful.
07/11/2003 05:19:22 PM
You take some very impressive landscape pictures. Always filling the frame with several levels and layers of depth. I love the depth of this one...with the driftwood in the foreground and yet everything to the horizon is still in focus and as much a part of the completed image. What did you have your camera set on for this shot? Did you use a tripod? What lens did you use?
  Photographer found comment helpful.


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