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three stories
three stories
jmritz


Photograph Information Photographer's Comments
Collection: three stories
Date Uploaded: Mar 2, 2015

Viewed: 288
Comments: 7
Favorites: 1 (view)

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04/01/2015 04:13:56 AM
Originally posted by mariuca:

I imagine you John with a tiny camera that has a tremendous capacity of zooming into one's heart, standing in the middle of the road and marveling. Your camera is never mean, always compassionate, sometimes baffled, sometimes annoyed and sometimes carrying the weight of the world.


Crikey, I love that comment!
  Photographer found comment helpful.
03/13/2015 11:37:41 AM
I imagine you John with a tiny camera that has a tremendous capacity of zooming into one's heart, standing in the middle of the road and marveling. Your camera is never mean, always compassionate, sometimes baffled, sometimes annoyed and sometimes carrying the weight of the world.
  Photographer found comment helpful.
03/11/2015 03:21:11 AM
I had to look at this series of images at least a half dozen times before I found a thread through all of them. I note that you mention that there are three stories right from the outset. However, in each case, there is something more, hidden at first and revealed at the end of each vignette. It's almost as if there are six stories, all of them connected by location.

The first one is outstanding as I missed the woman, even though she was included in the image. It seemed as if it was all about the black guy and his thought process and body language. Then, at the last moment, he moves and the woman is revealed, having been behind him and absorbed in her own thought process and body language the whole time, largely beyond what the camera tracked.

The second one uses a different device to make the reveal. This time a group of people are together and it is not clear what is going on until you telescope into the heart of the group and find the man counting and arranging his money. The others, who appear to be with him, are largely oblivious to his actions. What I liked especially about this one is that you have built on the first story's technique by having the final shot of this second series reveal a man standing in the background, harking back to the title page where he was first shown. It's as if he has also been part of the story, just another layer hiding in the background.

The final image of interaction ends with a view of cars and motorists in the background. Again, behind the main story of a man helping two women put bags in the car, is another whole layer of activity going on, unrelated, but simultaneous with the main subject.

And isn't this just the way life works. From our frame of reference (here, the camera's viewpoint) we focus on a slice of life, while largely unseen until the last moment, another slice is taking place, all linked by time and place but unrelated otherwise. Well, that's how I look at your essay. And it took some careful looking repeatedly to make sense of it all. As a whole, though it all ties together.
  Photographer found comment helpful.
03/08/2015 07:00:53 AM
You have the marvellous talent of combining culture with environment. And so personalised. You're a man of the people.
  Photographer found comment helpful.
03/07/2015 04:12:55 AM
You do more with less than any photographer I have ever known. Your stuff always seems like the sketches of a great artist. You'll scoff at the comparison probably laugh out loud but your photographs remind me of Picasso's single line drawings (contour drawings?), where everything is about capturing the essence of a thing with the maximum economy, and fuck the details, which are irrelevant or even worse obscuring. If that comparison's too rich for you, then how about gestural drawings? Would you buy that? Your photographs are gestural drawings. Can't deny me that one, John.

We naturally deplore the relative scarcity of your signature titles in this essay. I know you had no choice in this context, but your titles are actually my favourite pleasure at DPC. Not kidding.

Thank you.
  Photographer found comment helpful.
03/04/2015 03:12:39 PM
the trick is in how to tell the story. you tell your stories by charging into them. you start wide and end close up. it's a thrill ride.
  Photographer found comment helpful.
03/04/2015 02:13:28 PM
These are wonderful short stories. You have some innate ability to capture scenes in a way that most of us can't do. I have often studied your images trying to figure out how you do it but I give up. I have decided to just enjoy them. My favorites are your first and last images but they are all perfect for the essay.
  Photographer found comment helpful.


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