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DPChallenge Forums >> Administrator Announcements >> The DQ Process: A Voter's Guide
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12/18/2003 06:56:16 AM · #1
This guide is to let voters know how the DQ process works, including when to use it, and what to expect from it. If you have any questions, please ask here or send me (or any member of the site council) a PM.

If you find a photo that you consider is breaking the rules:
- Request a DQ against it, and give your reason(s) as to why you think the photo is breaking the rules - There's no need to quote the exact rule from the rules page though.
- Don't forget to vote as though the photo is legal!

The site council will then receive the request, and decide (by discussion and voting) upon on one of three possible courses of action:

DQ - If the photo has obviously broken the rules, eg text added, the photo will be disqualified and removed from the voting process. The photographer concerned will also be notified of the disqualification, and the reason(s) behind it.

No DQ - If the request doesn't indicate a rule being broken, eg doesn't meet the challenge topic, then no action will be taken, and the photographer will not be contacted.

Request Proof - If the council are uncertain of whether a rule has been broken, eg the request was for outside challenge dates or a particular technique, then the photographer will be contacted and asked to upload the original photo along with the methods used to create the final submission.
Once the original photo and methods have been uploaded, the council will then decide whether or not to DQ the photo. If DQ, then the photo will be removed as per the above. If not DQ, then the photo will remain and an admin note will be added to the photo to indicate that the shot has been verified as legal.
Occasionally, if for example the methods aren't explained clearly, then the council may decide to re-request proof from the photographer, along with specific reasons for the additional request.
If the original isn't uploaded within a reasonable time period (usually at least three days), or if the photographer doesn't contact the admins to give their reasons for delaying the upload, then the photo might be disqualified for not responding with proof.

Other notes:

Having a DQ request against your photo doesn't mean that you've been accused of cheating! In many cases, the requestor is just uncertain about how the image was created and wants to know how it was done, or doesn't realise how certain effects can be achieved without breaking the rules (the classic being selective desaturation of various colours).

Once a challenge completes, the top 5 or so photos will be requested to provide proof. This isn't due to a specific DQ request, merely a verification that the winners all played by the rules.

And finally, please remember to read the submission rules, along with any additional rules specific to each challenge!

ADDITIONAL

Good reasons for raising a DQ request (for normal open rules):

- The photo appears to have used illegal editting techniques (eg special effects or filters that aren't specifically allowed).
- The photo was taken outside the challenge submission dates.
- The photo contains text that has been added during editting, or other graphical artworks (eg clipart).
- The photo doesn't belong to the photographer who submitted it.
- The photo depicts solely and entirely a work of art, without any context.
- The photo consists of a composite of multiple images that couldn't have been created in-camera (ie multiple exposures in-camera are legal).
- The photo contains graphic nudity (ie depicting genitalia or specific sexual acts).
- The photo blatantly encourages drug or alcohol abuse.

Bad reasons for raising a DQ request - these requests will most likely be ignored:

- The photo doesn't appear to meet the challenge topic.
- The photo contains content that isn't "appropriate for minors" or the like (except graphic nudity and blatant drug/alcohol encouragement / abuse).

However, if you are unsure, raise the DQ request anyway, and the site council will decide upon a course of action, if required.

Message edited by author 2004-01-07 14:08:04.
12/18/2003 07:12:26 AM · #2
Good idea Manic, this should clear up a lot of questions. Maybe we should also add this as a link to the "Disqualification" section in the Challenge rules, or else it will eventually get lost in the sea of forum threads.
12/18/2003 09:25:01 AM · #3
Originally posted by kiwiness:

Good idea Manic, this should clear up a lot of questions. Maybe we should also add this as a link to the "Disqualification" section in the Challenge rules, or else it will eventually get lost in the sea of forum threads.


Or even better, make it the page that you go to when you request a DQ on a photo. You could include a button to press to agree that you've read it, then you would go to the actual DQ processing page. This way no one could say they didn't know...
12/18/2003 09:40:15 AM · #4
Originally posted by TooCool:

Originally posted by kiwiness:

Good idea Manic, this should clear up a lot of questions. Maybe we should also add this as a link to the "Disqualification" section in the Challenge rules, or else it will eventually get lost in the sea of forum threads.


Or even better, make it the page that you go to when you request a DQ on a photo. You could include a button to press to agree that you've read it, then you would go to the actual DQ processing page. This way no one could say they didn't know...


I agree. I had requested one DQ because that photo are so strange colored to be a photo! But many people are in doubt about how DQ is and how to request it.
01/07/2004 02:10:26 PM · #5
Just to let you know, this guide is now linked from the challenge rules page, so you will be able to find it from there in future.
04/08/2004 03:50:07 PM · #6
In a recent challenge I voted on a shot of a statue shot against a blue sky, and I assumed it would be DQed due to the " work of art without context" rule but judged it on the other qualities as per rules. Come time to post results it did pretty well, and it left me puzzled, can I submit pictures of other people's works of art or not?
04/08/2004 04:09:45 PM · #7
It has to be a literal representation. That usually means there can't be anything else in the photo, and that it is "flatly illuminated". If there is a cloudy sky, "creative" lighting, etc. in the picture, then it is no longer a "literal" interpretation of the art, and won't be DQ'd. It is only when the "art" (or portion of the "art" if the whole thing isn't in the picture) in question is the only thing in the photograph that this rule might apply.

It is primarily intended to prevent people from taking a photo, editing up the ying-yang (in a Basic Editing challenge), then printing it out and re-photographing it or their monitor. Or from photographing the Mona Lisa and submitting it to the "Portraits" challenge. Or photographing a cool-looking magazine ad.

If the only thing a person looking at the photo can evaluate is the art itself (and not anything added by the photographer such as composition, lighting, etc.) then it could be violating this rule and eligible for DQ.

Message edited by author 2004-04-08 16:11:07.
04/08/2004 04:16:06 PM · #8
The 'literal artwork' rule has always been a hard one to get across. The intent of the rule is to prevent photos containing solely an existing piece of art, and nothing else: "Literal photographic representations of the entirety of existing works of art".

The important factor here is context - if the artwork is shown in context, eg a painting with it's frame hanging on a wall, then that is usually permitted. However, if there is no context, eg the photo is just a flat view of the entire painting, with no noticable lighting or background environment, then that is usually DQd. Photos of statues are usually permitted, since the lighting and camera angle create an interpretation, rather than a literal representation.

If in doubt, raise a DQ request, and vote as normal. If you see that the photo hasn't been disqualified, then you can be assured that the council have decided that the artwork rule hasn't been broken.
04/08/2004 04:16:43 PM · #9
Eddy, you're too quick for me ;o)
04/08/2004 04:22:34 PM · #10
LOL. At least it shows that the SC are mostly on the same page! =]
04/08/2004 04:22:48 PM · #11
Originally posted by EddyG:

It has to be a literal representation. That usually means there can't be anything else in the photo, and that it is "flatly illuminated". If there is a cloudy sky, "creative" lighting, etc. in the picture, then it is no longer a "literal" interpretation of the art, and won't be DQ'd. It is only when the "art" (or portion of the "art" if the whole thing isn't in the picture) in question is the only thing in the photograph that this rule might apply.

It is primarily intended to prevent people from taking a photo, editing up the ying-yang (in a Basic Editing challenge), then printing it out and re-photographing it or their monitor. Or from photographing the Mona Lisa and submitting it to the "Portraits" challenge. Or photographing a cool-looking magazine ad.

If the only thing a person looking at the photo can evaluate is the art itself (and not anything added by the photographer such as composition, lighting, etc.) then it could be violating this rule and eligible for DQ.


I think they should be harsher on DQing this type of pic. The last few challenges have had 2 or 3 of this type - it seems to be growing in number. Since the rules say you cannot even take a pic of your own art, taking a pic of another's art shouldn't be permitted at all. Perhaps if were very abstract, or only a small part of a larger scene.

To me, taking a pic of another's art for a challenge (as in out of place or i know of several for strength) demonstrates a lack of creativity onthe entrant's part and a disregard for copyright/ownership - and that is one ethic that should be held in the highest esteem on this site.

We are artists. We create art (well, we try anyway). How would you feel if your picture was being used as part of an ad or contest entry or even for educational purposes without your knowledge or consent?
04/08/2004 04:23:55 PM · #12
And just so everyone knows, you don't have to paste giant chunks of the rules into the DQ request section. We know what they are. "Art" or "literal art" or something will do. :)
04/08/2004 04:31:08 PM · #13
bestagents: Please define when an object becomes "art". =] There are plenty of photographs of wheels in the Wheels challenge (imagine that). A lot of them are probably covered by Design Patents issued the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The desingers of those wheels would probably consider their work "art", as would the people who designed the Ford Thunderbird, or the Apple iMac, or the Golden Gate bridge, or the London Eye, or the CN Tower...

I've already explained the major purpose of the rule (to prevent literal re-use of somebody elses or even your own work where the only thing the viewer can evaluate is the art itself and nothing else about the picture), but saying that no type of "art" should be permitted would severely limit the types of things that could submitted to DPC challenges since almost anything man-made could be considered "art".

Message edited by author 2004-04-08 16:50:31.
07/28/2004 08:03:00 AM · #14
aha! here's the information i was looking for! one of my images was disqualified because i used multiple images to create it. i did not realize that this was not allowed, because it is not mentioned anywhere in the "basic editing" rules. i think you might want to add this to the "basic editing" rules. i'm a new member who tends to create a lot of images using multiple shots, and i was driving myself crazy trying to figure out why my entry was DQ'd.

anyways, i apologize. i'll keep my entries to one snap from now on.
07/29/2004 07:31:56 AM · #15
You are correct, this should have been in the Advanced Editing rules and somehow gotten deleted.

That said, combining images would require the use of a selection tool and therefore is still in violation of the basic rules, specifically:

Spot-Editing: Absolutely no spot-editing is allowed. This includes, but is not limited to drawing tools, dodging/bluring tools, and cloning tools. Additionally, the use of any type of selection tool is prohibited except to select a non-feathered, non-anti-aliased rectangular area for cropping. (Emphasis mine).

Sorry for the confustion and we will clarify this for future challenges.

-Terry
07/29/2004 08:15:06 AM · #16
What I really get confused by is if ps or another program auto selects with feather or otherwise automatically applies a feathered effect such as: http://dpchallenge.com/challenge_vote_image.php?IMAGE_ID=92859 it is likely not to be disqualified but if the user purposefully of accidentally does so it is disqualified in short order.
07/29/2004 10:07:52 AM · #17
Borders are the only other exception to the feathered selection rule, and thus images like that are permitted.
07/29/2004 10:13:50 AM · #18
but my thinking is that the difference is a click not the end result...if you use a selection tool with feather and create the border it will be disqualified; if you can find the word border and it does the exact same thing it isn't (at least from the way I understand it...am I wrong?)

Message edited by author 2004-07-29 10:14:25.
07/29/2004 11:58:57 AM · #19
When I say 'border', I'm refering to the end result, not a PS tool (since I'm not a PS user I didn't know that it existed as such).
09/29/2004 05:09:07 AM · #20
Hi, its me again!
Muahahahahahahha! DQ DQ DQ DQ...


I think I have a good idea about the "off topic" pictures.
No read on, don't delete or skip....

Would only be used for statatistic purposes...

Add an off topic checkbox on the voting page.

Then just like all other statisic it would be displayed when viewing the picture as a % of users thinking the picture was off topic and the average vote from users thinking it was of topic.

This would make intresting statistics, or what do you think?
09/29/2004 06:40:56 AM · #21
Instead of 'average vote from users thinking it was off topic', I think 'average vote from users thinging it was on topic' would be more interesting.

Good idea, and a useful stat.

David
09/29/2004 07:15:34 AM · #22
Originally posted by Britannica:

Instead of 'average vote from users thinking it was off topic', I think 'average vote from users thinging it was on topic' would be more interesting.

Good idea, and a useful stat.

David


Great idea.
09/29/2004 07:24:42 AM · #23
Yes, your right but I would like to see these stats:

%voted on topic:
Average on topic:
Avreage off topic:

Originally posted by Britannica:

Instead of 'average vote from users thinking it was off topic', I think 'average vote from users thinging it was on topic' would be more interesting.

Good idea, and a useful stat.

David

09/29/2004 07:56:01 AM · #24
Good idea, but you forgot one DQ reason:

- Same photo sumbitted to two challenges. (Yes, I know, it has to be the EXACT same frame, but if you suspect, then request DQ)
09/29/2004 08:05:02 AM · #25
Originally posted by nshapiro:

- Same photo sumbitted to two challenges. (Yes, I know, it has to be the EXACT same frame, but if you suspect, then request DQ)

Ah yes, well spotted :o) Of course, my list is more a set of examples rather than a definitive list, and any suspected rules violation (including image recycling) should be reported.
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