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Showing posts 126 - 150 of 297, (reverse)
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04/25/2010 02:43:58 PM · #126
Originally posted by spiritualspatula:

I'm not intending to say it isn't useful for some people. I'm sure it can be. And I should have clarified my "screwing" comment by explaining I meant regarding criticisms. It's pretty audacious to say your product is magic. To me, the issue is that it isn't a computer replacement, and it isn't a phone really. It's in a nether region between both that simply creates another device category instead of simplifying things. Now you need to carry your macbook and ipad? Why would anybody do that? Keep in mind you're speaking to somebody who loves new gadgets and accepts moderate redundancy. It's just frustrating to me.
Regarding sales, people will buy anything new. Remember the Furby? Novelty sells, regardless.
If you're happy with it, cool, I'm glad.
I'm fine with things evolving and changing too, but making every consumer buy an overpriced (Apple accessories are outrageously priced for what they are, across the board) accessory just to get functionality most expect is sorta annoying.
I've never thought being a 1st gen user has brought any good things to the table, and I'm not saying the future iterations won't be awesome and actually live up to the bar that the company set for itself, but right now I don't think it does.


I hear ya. I do think Apple wants to create a new category with the device.

I did struggle on the last trip. I have to carry my work PC laptop, but it is horrible for editing photos, so usually I carry my MacBook, too.

So as I am preparing for this trip, I decided I didn't want to carry 2 laptops and the iPad. I had to have my PC laptop for work, so I left the MacBook behind. I really missed when editing for the current challenges. I would edit it on my PC, upload it to DPC and look at it on the iPad. Hardly an acceptable workflow.

While I can put Windows on my MacBook, we register all the PCs that have access to the network, so I can't VPN to the network with a non-company asset.

So, I am struggling with this too.

Like I said, it's not perfect, and I think it will take some time for it to settle into its niche. I don't usually buy 1st gen stuff either, but since the iPad from an OS and application standpoint is an extension of the iPod/iPhone family, it is a bit a head of the curve that most new devices.

As for the "magic" moniker, a marketing ploy to get people's attention. I wouldn't hold that against them. But if you get a chance, find an iPad with the application called Star Walk on it. It's pretty close to magic! ;-)
04/25/2010 03:27:01 PM · #127
Originally posted by zeuszen:

And I wouldn't buy the (non-Apple) substitutes, if someone paid me. There you have it. McDonald vs. fresh fruit.

I generally agree, but Griffin Technology makes great accessories on par with Apple's.

Originally posted by scarbrd:

I had to have my PC laptop for work, so I left the MacBook behind. I really missed when editing for the current challenges. I would edit it on my PC, upload it to DPC and look at it on the iPad. Hardly an acceptable workflow.

Great timing, though! ;-P
04/27/2010 01:34:20 PM · #128
So the iPad has already been attacked by a virus. BUT the only affected users are hackers that have managed to install Windows on it.

That'll learn 'em! I'm not going to say "I told you so". Oops - guess I did it anyway ;)
04/27/2010 02:04:17 PM · #129
Originally posted by TrollMan:

So the iPad has already been attacked by a virus. BUT the only affected users are hackers that have managed to install Windows on it.

That'll learn 'em! I'm not going to say "I told you so". Oops - guess I did it anyway ;)


Why on earth would they want to do that? Windows isn't exactly designed as a touch interface OS.
04/27/2010 02:06:54 PM · #130
Originally posted by scarbrd:

Why on earth would they want to do that? Windows isn't exactly designed as a touch interface OS.

You expect a reason that makes sense? Hellooooo... they're using WINDOWS!
04/27/2010 02:13:54 PM · #131
Originally posted by scalvert:

Originally posted by scarbrd:

Why on earth would they want to do that? Windows isn't exactly designed as a touch interface OS.

You expect a reason that makes sense? Hellooooo... they're using WINDOWS!

I wasn't going to say that Shannon. But thanks for saying it on behalf of all of us fan-boys! :)
04/27/2010 02:37:58 PM · #132
Best photo editing app for iPad so far, Photogene.
04/27/2010 02:59:35 PM · #133
Originally posted by scarbrd:

Originally posted by TrollMan:

So the iPad has already been attacked by a virus. BUT the only affected users are hackers that have managed to install Windows on it.

That'll learn 'em! I'm not going to say "I told you so". Oops - guess I did it anyway ;)


Why on earth would they want to do that? Windows isn't exactly designed as a touch interface OS.

Actually, Windows 7 supports touch. Video of it in action.
04/27/2010 03:02:49 PM · #134
Originally posted by Louis:

Windows 7 supports touch.

Does it come with a ten foot pole? ;-)
04/27/2010 03:13:06 PM · #135
Originally posted by Louis:

Originally posted by scarbrd:

Originally posted by TrollMan:

So the iPad has already been attacked by a virus. BUT the only affected users are hackers that have managed to install Windows on it.

That'll learn 'em! I'm not going to say "I told you so". Oops - guess I did it anyway ;)


Why on earth would they want to do that? Windows isn't exactly designed as a touch interface OS.

Actually, Windows 7 supports touch. Video of it in action.


Supports, yes. Designed from the ground up for a touch interface, not so much.

For example, the first half of the video shows the mouse curser being moved around the screen to click on things, move things, etc. On a Touch screen device, why would I want to use the mouse pointer when I can just tap on the button, window, or menu?

Not slamming it really, but MS made the decision to not build an OS specifically for a touch screen device, but rather adopt Windows as best they could.

I think this will be a real differrentiator when comparing Windows based tablets to the iPad.

We'll see when the HP Slate arrives.
04/27/2010 03:26:10 PM · #136
Originally posted by scarbrd:

Supports, yes. Designed from the ground up for a touch interface, not so much.

Right. Surface is though. I was blown away by that video when it came out in 2007. The highest rated comment on that video btw: "The Possibility of two people in the same room at the same table having zunes is unrealistic." :-)
04/27/2010 03:40:28 PM · #137
Originally posted by Louis:

Originally posted by scarbrd:

Supports, yes. Designed from the ground up for a touch interface, not so much.

Right. Surface is though. I was blown away by that video when it came out in 2007. The highest rated comment on that video btw: "The Possibility of two people in the same room at the same table having zunes is unrealistic." :-)


Great line!

Yeah, Surface is cool, but has there been one in the real world? That was like 2-3 years ago. I'll bet Apple or Google comes out with it for real before MS can.

The OS for the new Windows Mobile and the Slate will be basically Windows CE with a Windows 7 polish.
04/27/2010 06:27:48 PM · #138
Originally posted by scarbrd:

Yeah, Surface is cool, but has there been one in the real world?

Surface was intended to be a commercial application for the time being. It's out in the wild.
04/28/2010 05:05:09 PM · #139
The iPad virus rumors are apparently false

Message edited by author 2010-04-28 17:05:20.
04/29/2010 10:29:14 AM · #140
Steve Jobs' open letter "Thoughts on Flash"

Interesting read.
04/29/2010 06:11:14 PM · #141
Originally posted by scarbrd:

Steve Jobs' open letter "Thoughts on Flash"

Interesting read.


A very interesting read indeed. I tend to very much agree with what he has to say. Then again, I may be biased... I've never understood the value of Flash beyond its initial application of relatively simple animation.
Well, OK, I'll admit that Flash video was probably attractive initially for two reasons; first, the set of scattered, incompatible formats that comprised the alternatives, and second, the ability to (somewhat) secure the video and disallow easy downloading.
Bottom line, if Flash dies out, you won't here me crying!
04/29/2010 06:17:05 PM · #142
Originally posted by scarbrd:

Steve Jobs' open letter "Thoughts on Flash"

Interesting read.

I hear what he is saying. And I agree with everything. But the bottom line for me is that I still need to bring my laptop (albeit Mac) while travelling in order to work my flash dependent day trading apps and live sports betting. How else could I finance my photo equipment?!? ;)

But I look forward to the day that I only need to bring an iPad.

Message edited by author 2010-04-29 18:18:01.
04/29/2010 08:35:33 PM · #143
Problem with not supporting Flash is that it cripples users of that device from enjoying a full internet experience. I hear what he is saying but by forcing the issue (not supporting Flash to try and force Change) he is penalizing users who want to use sites that currently need Flash. And Apple people always complained about Microsoft's bullying techniques.
04/29/2010 08:52:25 PM · #144
Originally posted by jbsmithana:

Problem with not supporting Flash is that it cripples users of that device from enjoying a full internet experience. I hear what he is saying but by forcing the issue (not supporting Flash to try and force Change) he is penalizing users who want to use sites that currently need Flash. And Apple people always complained about Microsoft's bullying techniques.


But how is the Flash experience when Flash is designed for a mouse and pointer? Most Flash events are on what is called "mouse over". You place the mouse pointer over something and the screen changes or a menu pops up. On touch devices this simply does not work, no matter if it's iPad, Android, Windows mobile, whatever. No mouse pointer, no interactive flash. So unless you just have to have those Flash based ads that run across your screen, then there's not much point to it on a touch device.

On the video playback, YouTube and most other video sites no longer require Flash.

Also, it's Adobe that makes a horrible Flash plug in on the Mac. Apple does not write it, Adobe does, and they admit they've done a poor job on the Mac.

Flash will be completely gone in 3-5 years.
04/29/2010 09:16:59 PM · #145
It's comical to watch someone who's entire business is based on proprietary and closed systems knocking Flash for being proprietary.

And Flash is proprietary only in that Adobe controls the compiler and the format. The SDK to develop and compile flash is free, it's platform independent (works on all browsers), and can reach almost all Internet browsers. That's a sweet deal for developers. Contrast that with Apple app development - you have to pay to be in the program, your programs target a couple devices (albeit very popular devices), and your apps must pass through a screening process.

The result is that anybody is enabled to create rich Internet applications and distribute them however to whoever they want... Well, except for iSheep.

News flash, Steve. Enabling people to freely develop and distribute is what open source is all about.

ETA: The decision to disallow Flash on the iDevices 1) even after Adobe has done all the footwork by creating the iPhone packager and 2) even though Apple still would retain App Store quality control is just plain underhanded and is bad for developers and end users both. Whether it pans out as a good business decision or not remains to be seen.

Message edited by author 2010-04-29 21:39:39.
04/29/2010 09:48:48 PM · #146
Originally posted by smurfguy:

It's comical to watch someone who's entire business is based on proprietary and closed systems knocking Flash for being proprietary.

And Flash is proprietary only in that Adobe controls the compiler and the format. The SDK to develop and compile flash is free, it's platform independent (works on all browsers), and can reach almost all Internet browsers. That's a sweet deal for developers. Contrast that with Apple app development - you have to pay to be in the program, your programs target a couple devices (albeit very popular devices), and your apps must pass through a screening process.

The result is that anybody is enabled to create rich Internet applications and distribute them however to whoever they want... Well, except for iSheep.

News flash, Steve. Enabling people to freely develop and distribute is what open source is all about.


HTML5, CSS, JavaScript - all open, all work on all browsers, none of which requires a proprietary plugin. THAT'S open, Flash isn't.

Ironically, before Adobe bought Macromedia they lead the effort to kill Flash.

I used to be a huge Adobe fan, but they've screwed the pooch on this, Adobe forms, and more.

Apple owners are responsible for 50% of Adobe's revenue and they continue to ignore the platform that made them who they are.

Think what you want about Apple, but that is just bad business.

Oh, and another news flash (pardon the pun) web browsing is just one of the functions out of a zillion on the iPad/iPhone.

Message edited by author 2010-04-29 21:49:46.
04/29/2010 10:16:22 PM · #147
Originally posted by scarbrd:

HTML5, CSS, JavaScript - all open, all work on all browsers

I was hoping someone would regurgitate the Word of Jobs regarding these technologies. In fact they don't all work the same on all browsers.

Steve said that Flash is "old", but HTML and JavaScript are much older. ActionScript 3 was released in June 2006. In fact, HTML and JavaScript pointedly highlight the drawbacks of open source technologies - companies will develop their own custom extensions and the language becomes a complete bloated mess. Instead of an open standard, developers workload is tripled in supporting all the different flavors and implementations each browser decides to implement. Progress is being made in this area, but it's not there yet.

HTML, CSS, and JavaScript are typically plaintext - inefficient in transfer and open to theft/manipulation.

You are right about one thing - Adobe makes the products that creative people use. And they've geared them toward delivering rich content, media, and applications via a web-browser plugin, which means developers don't have to fret with all the HTML/js inconsistencies.

If and when there's a suite of creative tools for developing rich HTML5 content as good as Adobe CS, maybe we'll see a decline in Flash. Until then, there's no chance of HTML5 displacing Flash. In fact, I wonder if Apple will take this so far as to develop such tools in the near future.
04/29/2010 10:29:23 PM · #148
Originally posted by smurfguy:

HTML, CSS, and JavaScript are typically plaintext - inefficient in transfer...

I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around this. Plain text is very efficient to transfer, particularly when delivered via the lightweight application of a web page. Add server compression and it's faster (not that it's ever particularly slow). Consider that entire JavaScript APIs are delivered in a few tens of Ks -- the MooTools API is about 24K I think -- and you ain't doing too badly. Even the full ExtJS API delivered in plain text is a lousy 600K, and it can wash your car and drive your kids to school.
04/29/2010 10:45:50 PM · #149
Originally posted by smurfguy:

Originally posted by scarbrd:

HTML5, CSS, JavaScript - all open, all work on all browsers

I was hoping someone would regurgitate the Word of Jobs regarding these technologies. In fact they don't all work the same on all browsers.

Steve said that Flash is "old", but HTML and JavaScript are much older. ActionScript 3 was released in June 2006. In fact, HTML and JavaScript pointedly highlight the drawbacks of open source technologies - companies will develop their own custom extensions and the language becomes a complete bloated mess. Instead of an open standard, developers workload is tripled in supporting all the different flavors and implementations each browser decides to implement. Progress is being made in this area, but it's not there yet.

HTML, CSS, and JavaScript are typically plaintext - inefficient in transfer and open to theft/manipulation.

You are right about one thing - Adobe makes the products that creative people use. And they've geared them toward delivering rich content, media, and applications via a web-browser plugin, which means developers don't have to fret with all the HTML/js inconsistencies.

If and when there's a suite of creative tools for developing rich HTML5 content as good as Adobe CS, maybe we'll see a decline in Flash. Until then, there's no chance of HTML5 displacing Flash. In fact, I wonder if Apple will take this so far as to develop such tools in the near future.


Like I said, I've been a big time Adobe user for years.

But, if everything you say is true, it still doesn't address the fact that Flash is not geared for a touch device. and that is the only platform Apple rejects Flash. Flash runs on Apple computers, albeit bloated and unstable. The other big issue with Flash is security, Flash has a worse track record than Windows. At least Microsoft releases security patches on a regular basis, Adobe can take weeks, sometime months to address critical security holes in Flash and Acrobat. Ask any corporate IT security wonk.

The punchline to the whole issue, is Flash isn't running on any mobile device at that moment. And when and if the vaporware Flash 10.1 ever arrives, it won't run on 95% of the smart phones out right now. Only the most current phones being sold today with the fastest processors will run it, 800Mhz, I think. So, all this talk about not running Flash on the iPhone is a bit disingenuous.

Message edited by author 2010-04-30 08:11:30.
04/30/2010 07:52:43 AM · #150
Hewlett-Packard To Kill Windows 7 Tablet Project

Looks like HP is not satisfied with Windows 7 for their tablet project.
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