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03/09/2010 07:56:24 PM · #1
Howdy,

SO... when you do a job for a client and you throw in a CD/DVD of the images, how do you design the labels for them? I'm trying to make one in Photoshop with a template and it is a huge pain in the ass.

Do you use a different piece of software?

thanks!
03/09/2010 07:59:18 PM · #2
I got a DVD/CD Burner with LightScribe... so much easier!
03/09/2010 08:04:55 PM · #3
i never thought of that... i guess this crap that came on my PC is handy for something!
03/09/2010 08:58:04 PM · #4
Originally posted by JokersSoul:

I got a DVD/CD Burner with LightScribe... so much easier!


I agree! Have had one - internal and/or external - almost since they came out. Granted, it takes some time, but for me, it is worth it.

Message edited by author 2010-03-09 21:09:05.
03/09/2010 09:09:24 PM · #5
Use nero type software or if your printer can do the cd/dvd printing then it should come with some software such as the Canon which comes with CD LabelPrint
Excellent quality and doesnt take to do
03/09/2010 09:20:08 PM · #6
i have a memorex dvd burner and use their software. i have a template so all i have to do is drop in a background image, change the text, and it prints perfectly...on memorex labels ;-)

regardless of how you do it, ya gotta do it...it put you MILES ahead of those who deliver plain dvds with sharpied scrawl all over them ;-)
03/09/2010 09:39:18 PM · #7
I usually design the label in PS, where I've got a template with the inner and outer diameters. Then I bring it into Memorex software and I'm good to go.

I agree that you have to label professional output professionally. Although I have lightscribe, sometimes I have to run as many as 50 copies and it's just too slow.

Message edited by author 2010-03-09 21:40:16.
03/10/2010 03:57:39 PM · #8
i tried lightscribes design program. It's hopeless at making anything cool looking.

I made a file on Photoshop, but since I don't have a printer here I need to find somewhere to do it for me- I looked around and it's sooo expensive!

Goddam print labs.
03/10/2010 05:13:18 PM · #9
I have a little tray on my printer where I can place printable DVDs and it lines them up etc lovely.. It comes with Roxio DVD label creator and I do the bulk of the design in Photoshop, save as JPG then import into the label program - the results look very professional. The printer is an HP C5280 all-in-one printer.
03/10/2010 05:50:36 PM · #10
Originally posted by Tez:

i tried lightscribes design program. It's hopeless at making anything cool looking.

The only limit is that it has to be in grayscale -- you can design the whole thing in Photoshop or Illustrator or whatever and import/place it into the LightScribe program for printing. But, printing over the entire printable area takes a long time, so it's suitable for demos, archives, and any other one-off uses, but not for duplication.

FWIW: disc duplicators with integrated inkjet printers can be had for under $1300 USD. If you do any short-run duplication one of these might become a worthwhile investment at some point ...

I've always been told to avoid sticking on paper labels if at all possible -- they can introduce balance/spin issues if applied imperfectly, and I don't trust any adhesive repeatedly (or even occassionally) to laser heat, or to time ... there are some models of "regular" inkjet printers which can print directy onto a disk, so I think one of those would also be better than the labels.
03/11/2010 02:51:43 AM · #11
thanks for the insights.

I also think paper labels would look crap when given to a paying client.

I'm looking into having a short run of discs made with printing direct onto the disc surface. It's more expensive but lasts longer and should look better. Also, I'm conscious of if a bride opens the cd box and sees it's a paper label, it won't be as impressive as it could be which isn't what i want.
03/11/2010 09:09:44 PM · #12
Originally posted by Tez:

I also think paper labels would look crap when given to a paying client.

it all depends on what they're expecting, what they're used to, and what they're paying. a high-end wedding client probably would expect more, as the dvd could very well be their primary deliverable, the thing that they're going to be popping in and out of various players for years to come.

on the other hand, for most of my clients, the dvd is simply a quick-and-dirty temporary data transfer medium used to get the images into their servers. they like having something they can read (as opposed to some god-awful scrawl), and they look pretty decent. but, by the same token, my clients are a lot more interested in what's stored on the disc than the disc's cosmetics ;-)
03/12/2010 01:08:40 AM · #13
you said "depends what they're used to", that is my point. People are used to printed adhesive labels. I want to exceed expectations by not giving them something they would be used to, but something that will impress them. Likewise, if they expect a printed dvd and I give them a paper label one, i'll look cheap.

What they're paying isn't hugely relevant, a $500 wedding deserves the same care as a $5000 wedding and I give DVDs with my $300 portrait packages also.
03/12/2010 09:54:16 AM · #14
Originally posted by Tez:

you said "depends what they're used to", that is my point. People are used to printed adhesive labels. I want to exceed expectations by not giving them something they would be used to, but something that will impress them. Likewise, if they expect a printed dvd and I give them a paper label one, i'll look cheap.

do whatever works for you. if money's no object, spend whatever it takes to be the most impressive guy out there.

Originally posted by Tez:

What they're paying isn't hugely relevant, a $500 wedding deserves the same care as a $5000 wedding and I give DVDs with my $300 portrait packages also.

i'm not saying treat customers differently by what they spend--you don't, i don't.
03/12/2010 12:15:33 PM · #15
I got an Epson Artisan 800 (now they have the 810) and it prints right on the CD/DVDs. You get printable disks and it comes with software to print on them. They have a white matte surface and look pretty professional when printed. I grab one of my favorite images from the shoot and drag it into Photoshop, and add an image of my business card as a layer, save it as a jpeg into a folder called CD Covers, and print it using a program that came with the Epson. They look great.
03/23/2010 06:49:52 PM · #16
I have Lightscribe and do like it. Not so fancy, but unlike a paper label, it won't peel! Downside is that you have to have special dvds which are a bit more expensive, so it's probably not real practical if you're doing a lot of them.
03/23/2010 10:17:12 PM · #17
I bought an Epson R280 for about $70. It prints directly onto printable cd/dvds which you can buy from Target/Office Max, etc. I have a Photoshop template that I design each cd in (same general format - my logo, their name and usually a photo background), import that image into the software that came with the printer and then print. It's easy, pretty quick and not too expensive for something that looks nice.
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