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12/29/2009 08:36:26 PM · #1
can you take pictures that were taken on a 2.1 megapixel camera and increase the pixel size? they are 1600 X 1200. Small huh....I want to use them on my calender but they are to small...and Rick (husband) thought that you guys/gals might know the answer to that question.
12/29/2009 08:42:09 PM · #2
I've printed pics of about that size and they have looked ok. If you want, there is software that can help to increase the size and keep it looking smooth. Here is a free, open-source one: Smilla enlarger
12/29/2009 09:09:41 PM · #3
For printing your rule of thumb is between 240dpi and 300dpi.

So the max print you will get that still looks good w/o blur is (1600/240) x (1200/240) or roughly 6.5" x 5"
12/29/2009 09:16:00 PM · #4
Originally posted by totaldis:

For printing your rule of thumb is between 240dpi and 300dpi.

So the max print you will get that still looks good w/o blur is (1600/240) x (1200/240) or roughly 6.5" x 5"


and what I trying to do is print a full page calender and some of the pictures that I want are from my little point and shoot (about 10 ish years old)...
12/29/2009 09:52:28 PM · #5
If you can get the right light, you may be able to take a picture of them with your "real" camera.

I've done that a couple of times to do restoration.

It's a bear to set up, but it works.

The last one I did, I actually had to take the picture at an angle because of a film/haze on the outside of the picture and then had to unskew it in PS.
12/29/2009 09:52:46 PM · #6
You can usually get an "acceptable" print quality at 150dpi (at final print size). You can also upsample your image with Photoshop, Elements, or most other photo editors up to 120% of the original size with reasonable quality, and you "may" gat acceptable quality up to 200%. There are programs such as Genuine Fractals which claim successful upsizing to greater degrees than this, but I haven't used them myself and they will probably cost more than you want to spend for this project.

Sometimes it's better to just let the printer upsize the image, even if it means using a lower-than-recommended dpi.

I also have a 1600x1200 camera, and I've made OK 8x10 prints from it -- I suggest you take one "typical" image and make one or two 8x10s as test images (perhaps using different techniques) to see what you might expect. At Costco you can make an 8x10 for $1.50 ... a pretty inexpensive experiment. They also print calendars inexpensively ...
12/29/2009 10:14:56 PM · #7
Originally posted by GeneralE:

There are programs such as Genuine Fractals which claim successful upsizing to greater degrees than this, but I haven't used them myself and they will probably cost more than you want to spend for this project.

Genuine Fractals lives up to its claims & more.

It's truly amazing.
12/29/2009 10:45:26 PM · #8
I have to get this from 72 dpi to 240...I don't think it's possible...we just though we'd ask....(can you believe we used to print 72 dpi....scary)

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