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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> How to eliminate glare on objects?
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11/24/2009 10:54:44 AM · #1
Hey all,

Wondering what's the best non-pp way to eliminate glare on glossy surfaces?

A component in a shot I am entering for a Basic challenge has a shiny surface, but cannot eliminate small areas of glare. Don't want to get a DQ if I use the healing or cloning tools to remove or tone down the glare, because that would count as spot editing.

Any ideas?
11/24/2009 11:01:40 AM · #2
Have you tried a Circular Polarizer? Or perhaps if it is lights, just move them around so that the reflected area isn't in the triangle that reaches the camera. I really suggest a reading of the book Light, Science, and Magic to help with these sorts of things. Link to book.

Matt
11/24/2009 11:02:33 AM · #3
A bounce flash usually helps...or a sand blaster
11/24/2009 11:09:20 AM · #4
Remember, you can use a circular polarizer indoors, too! Helps remove glare on surfaces and maintain detail on very light objects (wedding dresses as an example).
11/24/2009 11:31:12 AM · #5
Originally posted by Derf:

A bounce flash usually helps...or a sand blaster


Hmm, have been using a handheld flash. Was thinking more along the lines of dabbing object lightly with soot or dust.
11/24/2009 11:50:03 AM · #6
Originally posted by snaffles:

Originally posted by Derf:

A bounce flash usually helps...or a sand blaster


Hmm, have been using a handheld flash. Was thinking more along the lines of dabbing object lightly with soot or dust.


Now THAT's original. Dust, yeah, dust. I have some of that.
:-))
11/24/2009 01:08:17 PM · #7
Originally posted by sfalice:

Originally posted by snaffles:

Originally posted by Derf:

A bounce flash usually helps...or a sand blaster


Hmm, have been using a handheld flash. Was thinking more along the lines of dabbing object lightly with soot or dust.


Now THAT's original. Dust, yeah, dust. I have some of that.
:-))


Oh, could you send me some? There's a real shortage of dust at my place, what with a woodburning stove and all...;-)
11/24/2009 01:53:29 PM · #8
If the object is small enough, try shooting it in a light tent. If not one can be made out of any translucent material, that way the light will be broken up and a lot softer. I did it with a silver beer can just a couple of days ago for a class I was teaching and just used white drawing paper.
11/24/2009 04:02:27 PM · #9
Originally posted by cwyou:

If the object is small enough, try shooting it in a light tent. If not one can be made out of any translucent material, that way the light will be broken up and a lot softer. I did it with a silver beer can just a couple of days ago for a class I was teaching and just used white drawing paper.


Thanks for the input! I really only have the one off-camera flash, a few desklamps and a couple of big heat lamps that work pretty well. Very much a lighting noob.

BTW, I am very curious...unless they pp the crap out of them...how on earth do photogs shooting highly reflective surfaces like stainless steel cooking pots etc., manage to do so without getting glare or reflections esp of themselves or their setup?!
11/24/2009 04:13:27 PM · #10
Originally posted by snaffles:

Originally posted by cwyou:

If the object is small enough, try shooting it in a light tent. If not one can be made out of any translucent material, that way the light will be broken up and a lot softer. I did it with a silver beer can just a couple of days ago for a class I was teaching and just used white drawing paper.


Thanks for the input! I really only have the one off-camera flash, a few desklamps and a couple of big heat lamps that work pretty well. Very much a lighting noob.

BTW, I am very curious...unless they pp the crap out of them...how on earth do photogs shooting highly reflective surfaces like stainless steel cooking pots etc., manage to do so without getting glare or reflections esp of themselves or their setup?!


i use a circular polarizer to cut down on glare ;)

not sure if that would solve the reflection problem, but it should help with the glare part
11/24/2009 04:14:44 PM · #11
the simplest answer - i think - is large / diffused light.

a polarizer won't work on metal objects.


11/24/2009 04:15:39 PM · #12
Originally posted by snaffles:

Originally posted by cwyou:

If the object is small enough, try shooting it in a light tent. If not one can be made out of any translucent material, that way the light will be broken up and a lot softer. I did it with a silver beer can just a couple of days ago for a class I was teaching and just used white drawing paper.


Thanks for the input! I really only have the one off-camera flash, a few desklamps and a couple of big heat lamps that work pretty well. Very much a lighting noob.

BTW, I am very curious...unless they pp the crap out of them...how on earth do photogs shooting highly reflective surfaces like stainless steel cooking pots etc., manage to do so without getting glare or reflections esp of themselves or their setup?!


Purchase this book! It's a must.

Light Magic and Science
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