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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Why is this so cheap?
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04/05/2009 03:41:47 PM · #1
Just looking at lenses on Ebay and I'm not too knowledgeable about specific lenses, but this one seemed like a steal.

//cgi.ebay.co.uk/CANON-EOS-FIT-500mm-MACRO-LENS-FOR-D40-D50-D450D-D1000_W0QQitemZ220389192941QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUK_CamerasPhoto_CameraAccessories_CameraLensesFilters_JN?hash=item220389192941&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=66%3A2|65%3A1|39%3A1|240%3A1318

Am I missing a reason as to why this is going so cheap?

Message edited by author 2009-04-05 15:41:54.
04/05/2009 03:45:24 PM · #2
Seems about the right price for a Mirror lens (never heard of of a Centon lens mind you).
04/05/2009 03:53:28 PM · #3
Centon 500mm Mirror lenses were one of a quite large group of Manual Mirror lenses brought out in the '80s. f8 is okay on a bright sunny day, but once light levels fall, you are hard pressed to get a good exposure. Some are still produced today, a number of Russian ones appear regularly on ebay.

I owned a Sigma Mirror lens and used it on my Olympus OM10 many years ago and I was quite happy with it and the Bokeh is those strange doughnuts.

It went for quite a good prices as I have seen them selling for up to £100 on ebay. Good fun to use and of course with a DSLR crop factor you have a 750mm approx. Helps with getting used to manual focus.

Hope this helped.
04/05/2009 03:53:47 PM · #4
Because it's for those that still shoot film. Not compatible with any of the EOS digital bodies. Some of my friends still shoot with old film bodies, and they get some amazing prices on these old lenses.
04/05/2009 03:54:48 PM · #5
It's a cheap mirror lens, and likely to have poor image quality. Some of the less expensive mirror lenses actually have OK image quality, but I'd bet this is not one of those.
First clue is that they bill it as a "macro" which is utterly ridiculous.
04/05/2009 03:55:49 PM · #6
Originally posted by roba:

Because it's for those that still shoot film. Not compatible with any of the EOS digital bodies. Some of my friends still shoot with old film bodies, and they get some amazing prices on these old lenses.


I believe you can get the Canon adaptor ring for EOS cameras on ebay, so they will work as most have M42 screw thread mount.
04/05/2009 03:57:20 PM · #7
Originally posted by roba:

Because it's for those that still shoot film. Not compatible with any of the EOS digital bodies. Some of my friends still shoot with old film bodies, and they get some amazing prices on these old lenses.


It does appear to be an EOS-mount lens (actually a t-mount lens with an EOS T-ring). It's manual focus, but there should be no problem at all mounting/using it on a digital EOS body. Now whether it will produce acceptable images, that's quite another question.
04/05/2009 04:01:48 PM · #8
As I said earlier, I had one some years ago and I was surprised just how good the results were, however, with todays cameras and the quest for clarity and sharpness, I don't know if they could match the quality of modern lenses. But, if you don't mind investing £50 or so, it could be worth it for the fun factor. These lenses were definitely not Macro!!
04/05/2009 04:08:34 PM · #9
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by roba:

Because it's for those that still shoot film. Not compatible with any of the EOS digital bodies. Some of my friends still shoot with old film bodies, and they get some amazing prices on these old lenses.


It does appear to be an EOS-mount lens (actually a t-mount lens with an EOS T-ring). It's manual focus, but there should be no problem at all mounting/using it on a digital EOS body. Now whether it will produce acceptable images, that's quite another question.

Ahhh... I stand sit corrected :O)
I used to wonder about trying adapters, as some of the old FD long lenses are darned cheap (comparatively).
04/05/2009 04:10:27 PM · #10
Originally posted by roba:

Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by roba:

Because it's for those that still shoot film. Not compatible with any of the EOS digital bodies. Some of my friends still shoot with old film bodies, and they get some amazing prices on these old lenses.


It does appear to be an EOS-mount lens (actually a t-mount lens with an EOS T-ring). It's manual focus, but there should be no problem at all mounting/using it on a digital EOS body. Now whether it will produce acceptable images, that's quite another question.

Ahhh... I stand sit corrected :O)
I used to wonder about trying adapters, as some of the old FD long lenses are darned cheap (comparatively).


Give it a go! I use one and buy old M42 lenses, the beauty being you get some real gems like Leica and Ziess lenses for pennies. You can also get some real bummers:))

Message edited by author 2009-04-05 16:10:50.
04/05/2009 04:15:34 PM · #11
Originally posted by SteveJ:



Give it a go! I use one and buy old M42 lenses, the beauty being you get some real gems like Leica and Ziess lenses for pennies. You can also get some real bummers:))


Yep, M42 on Canon EOS usually works fine... but Canon FD on Canon EOS is a no-go. Well, technically it is possible via a couple different avenues, but rarely ever is it advisable.
04/05/2009 04:48:40 PM · #12
Ah there's my issue. I didn't actually know what a mirror lens was.
04/05/2009 05:12:30 PM · #13
Originally posted by Rankles:

Ah there's my issue. I didn't actually know what a mirror lens was.


Okay. If you buy a 500mm telephoto lens, you will get a long black tube with glass at one and glass at the other, that's about it. If you buy a Mirror lens, you get a big, fat, short, stubby lens that barely fits in your hands in diameter and is about 7" long.

What's the difference?? The long tube is like a telescope, it is simple but ungainly to carry around, but the image quality should!! be better.

The Mirror lens has a wider diameter, the image comes in the big end, hits a mirror at the smaller end and is bounced back to the big end and a smaller image goes back to the small end. That is the basics, the image quality can, and probably will detriorate a bit by the time it hits the sensor. It's a trade off, long and usually more expensive or short, dumpy and cheaper.
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