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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> Infrared and Slow shutter speed durring the day
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03/23/2009 04:00:24 PM · #1
Hi guys,
I've been meaning to ask a few questions I just never get around to it. I've owned a R72 Hoya filter for about a year now, maybe more. And have barely even used it. This being, because I can't seem to be getting something right. I've read over the posts on these forums and have read many tutorials, but they all tell me to do the same.

I own a Nikon D300, and a D50. With both it's the same thing, I keep being told I have to get the "White balance" correct, but it doesn't seem to be working out. A few tutorials I've read pretty much go by these lines:

Take a picture of something green on a sunny day, such as a really bright green car or grass. Put your camera on Preset mode for white balance and use the picture.
I do that, but nothing. I take pictures, and I know a slower shutter speed with a lower F-stop. I do this, and I do get nice pictures - but they're still red. Sometimes they'll be pink if I slow down the shutter speed low enough. If this is correct, can anyone show me an example of how green I would need it to be? I'd be much helpful!

My other question,
I've taken nice long exposed shots at night where you get the water that comes out smooth like silk, and I believe it's often referred to the "Cotton candy effect"? Well, is it possible to do this during the day? I was at the beach recently, and for the best of me I couldn't seem to get it how I wanted. It was at sunset, and I've seen some people do it of small waterfalls. I can imagine not for very long it being the day, (maybe 1.3) but I failed at it. I had an idea of maybe putting a dark filter on my lens to use slow shutter speeds during the day. Hope this wasn't confusing and thanks to anyone who replies.
03/23/2009 04:12:55 PM · #2
Originally posted by FernandoYi:

My other question,
I've taken nice long exposed shots at night where you get the water that comes out smooth like silk, and I believe it's often referred to the "Cotton candy effect"? Well, is it possible to do this during the day? I was at the beach recently, and for the best of me I couldn't seem to get it how I wanted. It was at sunset, and I've seen some people do it of small waterfalls. I can imagine not for very long it being the day, (maybe 1.3) but I failed at it. I had an idea of maybe putting a dark filter on my lens to use slow shutter speeds during the day. Hope this wasn't confusing and thanks to anyone who replies.

For this you often need an exposure time of a few seconds to several minutes, thus if a small aperture and low light by itself does not do the trick then you need to get a neutral density filter. Also, wait a while after the sun sets rather than trying right at sunset.
03/23/2009 07:33:41 PM · #3
Originally posted by FernandoYi:

Hi guys,
I've been meaning to ask a few questions I just never get around to it. I've owned a R72 Hoya filter for about a year now, maybe more. And have barely even used it. This being, because I can't seem to be getting something right. I've read over the posts on these forums and have read many tutorials, but they all tell me to do the same.

I own a Nikon D300, and a D50. With both it's the same thing, I keep being told I have to get the "White balance" correct, but it doesn't seem to be working out. A few tutorials I've read pretty much go by these lines:

Take a picture of something green on a sunny day, such as a really bright green car or grass. Put your camera on Preset mode for white balance and use the picture.
I do that, but nothing. I take pictures, and I know a slower shutter speed with a lower F-stop. I do this, and I do get nice pictures - but they're still red. Sometimes they'll be pink if I slow down the shutter speed low enough. If this is correct, can anyone show me an example of how green I would need it to be? I'd be much helpful!



ok... theres a few things you don't mention that are needed.

first, make sure that the filter is on when you take your shot for the custom white balance.
make sure that the green grass is properly exposed, and fills the whole frame.
in your camera set this picture to be your 'custom white balance'
you should now see a difference on your camera screen when taking shots.
images should almost be black and white.

also in pp, make sure when you convert the raw that you use the 'as shot' white balance!

hope this helps!
03/23/2009 11:39:47 PM · #4
I set my WB to a bright blue sky and haven't changed it since my first IR session.
03/24/2009 06:22:57 AM · #5
When the wb is set correctly on the D50 you should get these colours straight from camera.
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/4517/120/572126.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/4517/120/572126.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I doubt the D300 will give a custom wb setting but the D50 is so good for ir i wouldn`t bother with it.
03/24/2009 07:45:09 AM · #6
Try to set your white balance with something completely green filling the frame, like a patch of grass. Make sure the picture is correctly exposed. Read your manual, there are two ways of setting a custom white balance, one where you need to take a shot, and then make a preset from it, and one where you can have the camera automatically make the preset. I found that the latter worked out better for me.
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