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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> Film HDR
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01/14/2009 05:03:47 PM · #1
I just got a really sweet film scanner (Nikon coolscan), and I was wondering... Has anyone done black and white film HDR photos? I'm a teacher and I usually use 400ISO film w/ my students(will grain be an issue?), and it might be a sweet little experiment. I'm wondering if anyone has had any success, or has suggestions...
01/14/2009 05:54:19 PM · #2
I have tried (with mixed success) to do film HDR. I've found that -2 0 +2 EV works best; no need to go further like I often do with digital (usually -4 -2 0 +2 +4).

The biggest issue with film HDR is the minute changes that are bound to happen in your cameras positioning when you advance the film. You really do need a backing plate that is 'perfect' and you should use the biggest, most immovable tripod you own. LIke, if you have some huge steel thing that weights 50 pounds, use it. The first roll I tried went rather poorly; I didn't suspect anything was wrong until I went back to photoshop and noticed that my camera had moved just a touch in relation to the subject, which was enough to ruin the HDR. The next time, I used a better tripod and the results improved substantially.

CS3's merge to HDR feature utterly fails with scanned film images--I've had my best results using Photomatix Pro. Also, I usually shoot with ISO 50 or 100 so I can't answer your question about grain, but I suspect it would be a problem.

Message edited by author 2009-01-14 17:54:58.
01/20/2009 08:23:36 AM · #3
Thanks... seems like something most would avoid. It would certainly lengthen the process.
01/20/2009 09:15:54 AM · #4
If you are shooting B/W film and are in a situation where yuou need HDRI, then this is what Zone System is designed to deal with: expose for the shadows and shorten the processing time to keep the highlights from blocking up. It requires testing beforehand to set the parameters for your film/developer combination, in order to do it right, but you can also wing it with films with more latitude. -10% is a decent starting place for pretty contrasty scenes.

R.
01/20/2009 09:20:12 AM · #5
Originally posted by Sachlichkeit:

You really do need a backing plate that is 'perfect' and you should use the biggest, most immovable tripod you own. LIke, if you have some huge steel thing that weights 50 pounds, use it.

I find some sort of mirror lock-up setting to also be helpful.
01/20/2009 09:32:20 AM · #6
Originally posted by david_c:

Originally posted by Sachlichkeit:

You really do need a backing plate that is 'perfect' and you should use the biggest, most immovable tripod you own. LIke, if you have some huge steel thing that weights 50 pounds, use it.

I find some sort of mirror lock-up setting to also be helpful.


Plus if you're doing film HDR I'd think a motor drive would be de rigeur.

R.
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