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11/05/2008 07:56:26 AM · #1
Post your comments, questions, and reviews for...

'Macro Photography with a Reverse Mounted Lens'
by darnok

View this tutorial here.
11/05/2008 08:50:58 AM · #2
beautiful pictures. did you use a tripod to take those pictures or did you steady your camera some other way?
11/05/2008 09:00:56 AM · #3
Sweet tutorial, I reall want to try this some time.
11/05/2008 04:30:41 PM · #4
Originally posted by colorcarnival:

beautiful pictures. did you use a tripod to take those pictures or did you steady your camera some other way?

I sometimes use a tripod depending on circumstances, the bee and chameleon photo were taken hand help, with other two with a tripod.
11/05/2008 04:58:28 PM · #5
Great info, I didnt know there was a reversing ring to mount direct to the camera...

my last attempt I too it to the extreme, 40D Camera + Tamron 2X teleconverter + 70-300mm lens + reversed 50mm F1.8 = an insanely shallow focus plane but with a little patients could get better results than I achieved below lol. BTW the macro shot is uncropped...

734715.jpg


11/06/2008 10:54:11 AM · #6
Originally posted by darnok:

Originally posted by colorcarnival:

beautiful pictures. did you use a tripod to take those pictures or did you steady your camera some other way?

I sometimes use a tripod depending on circumstances, the bee and chameleon photo were taken hand help, with other two with a tripod.


I think that is some info you should include in your tutorial. I know that when you hand hold the reverse mount, the slightest movement will throw off the focus.
11/06/2008 11:24:51 AM · #7
Looks like a great tutorial! I've been thinking about a macro lens to play with for a while now, but going this route looks like it will save me a ton of cash - I'll have to give it a try.
11/06/2008 11:38:56 AM · #8
I took this a while back... the first time I ever reverse mounted my lens. It was a really hard picture to get, but completely worth it!

737021.jpg
11/09/2008 09:53:23 AM · #9
Originally posted by colorcarnival:

Originally posted by darnok:

Originally posted by colorcarnival:

beautiful pictures. did you use a tripod to take those pictures or did you steady your camera some other way?

I sometimes use a tripod depending on circumstances, the bee and chameleon photo were taken hand help, with other two with a tripod.


I think that is some info you should include in your tutorial. I know that when you hand hold the reverse mount, the slightest movement will throw off the focus.

I will find out how I can modify the tutorial and make some mention about using a tripod.

Originally posted by dknourek:

my last attempt I too it to the extreme, 40D Camera + Tamron 2X teleconverter + 70-300mm lens + reversed 50mm F1.8 = an insanely shallow focus plane but with a little patients could get better results than I achieved below lol. BTW the macro shot is uncropped...

734715.jpg

Wow, that is some serious magnification, much more than you will get with just reverse mounting something like a 50.

Originally posted by OdysseyF22:

Looks like a great tutorial! I've been thinking about a macro lens to play with for a while now, but going this route looks like it will save me a ton of cash - I'll have to give it a try.

The low cost is the reason I went the reversed lens route, I already had the 50mm lens and the reversing ring is very cheap.
11/09/2008 10:02:28 AM · #10
ha! try that with an old 24mm lens!!! the wider it is Reversed, the closer you can get...
11/09/2008 10:07:37 AM · #11
A 50mm f/1.8 II reversed in front of a 100/2.8.

307949.jpg
11/09/2008 10:15:16 AM · #12
I've been working my macro shots with extension tubes and reversing rings for some time, but that's a great tutorial and some splendid images.

EDIT: I handhold the vast majority of my reversed shots. You don't really lose light with reversing rings, so tripods aren't NECESSARY unless you want to make very sure your focus doesn't shift.

Message edited by author 2008-11-09 10:18:26.
11/09/2008 10:17:27 AM · #13
Quick question, along with a 50mm, I also have a 16-35 and a 70-200, using this method, which of the last 2 would give a closer image?
11/09/2008 10:31:42 AM · #14
Originally posted by alans_world:

Quick question, along with a 50mm, I also have a 16-35 and a 70-200, using this method, which of the last 2 would give a closer image?

The shorter the focal length the greater the magnification, so the 16-36 would give you a closer image.
11/09/2008 10:37:53 AM · #15
Originally posted by Anti-Martyr:

I've been working my macro shots with extension tubes and reversing rings for some time, but that's a great tutorial and some splendid images.

EDIT: I handhold the vast majority of my reversed shots. You don't really lose light with reversing rings, so tripods aren't NECESSARY unless you want to make very sure your focus doesn't shift.


LOL then you have far steadier hands than I do. I have found that my DOF is so narrow that I do actually lose what I want to keep in focus when I hand hold shots like these. I would love to be able to get the beautiful shots that 21.gif darnok gets.

don't think I said it before, but great idea for a tutorial 21.gif darnok. It will definitely help those on a budget.
11/09/2008 01:54:27 PM · #16
Nice tutorial. I have experimented recently with taping my 50mm/1.8 reversed in front of my 90mm macro lens and it was fascinating to get so close to things like this dime (which I shoehorned and almost got my first brown with):
732812.jpg

Is there a reason for attaching the ring to the camera first? I would have guessed you'd want to attach the ring to the lens first and then to the camera just to shorten the time the camera body is open to dust.

11/21/2008 06:39:43 PM · #17
Originally posted by Shutter-For-Hire:

ha! try that with an old 24mm lens!!! the wider it is Reversed, the closer you can get...

A 50mm is always a good starting point because it is so cheap and (at least with Nikon), the 50mm lens and reversing ring have the same thread size so no step-up/down rings are necessary. A 24mm lens with get you closer than a 50mm, but will have a short working distance (it's already very short with the 50mm...) which will make lighting your subject difficult.

Originally posted by Anti-Martyr:

I handhold the vast majority of my reversed shots. You don't really lose light with reversing rings, so tripods aren't NECESSARY unless you want to make very sure your focus doesn't shift.

I find that a tripod is very useful to get the focus right, the DOF is very shallow even when the lens is stopped down.

Originally posted by colorcarnival:

Originally posted by darnok:

Originally posted by colorcarnival:

beautiful pictures. did you use a tripod to take those pictures or did you steady your camera some other way?

I sometimes use a tripod depending on circumstances, the bee and chameleon photo were taken hand help, with other two with a tripod.


I think that is some info you should include in your tutorial. I know that when you hand hold the reverse mount, the slightest movement will throw off the focus.

I plan to update my tutorial with some more information about using a tripod and DOF. Anything else anyone feels I should add?
11/21/2008 07:15:46 PM · #18
yes
09/12/2009 11:32:45 AM · #19
Has anyone tried it with Canon 18-55 IS lens? Will it work and what will be the impact?
09/12/2009 11:40:51 AM · #20
Originally posted by yjoshi:

Has anyone tried it with Canon 18-55 IS lens? Will it work and what will be the impact?


I have reversed my 50mm on my non IS 18-55 and it works just fine, should on the IS one as well, you will just need a step down ring with the reversing ring as its a tad bigger than the 50mm prime.

-dave
02/09/2010 02:10:57 PM · #21
does this ruin the lens at all? i have a 18-55mm IS kit lens, woudl i be able to do this with that without ruining it?
02/09/2010 02:23:27 PM · #22
Originally posted by nadyafurnari:

does this ruin the lens at all? i have a 18-55mm IS kit lens, woudl i be able to do this with that without ruining it?


If you use the proper reversing ring and or step down ring then its no different than screwing a filter on to the front of your lens, easy to assemble and remove and nothing it harmed in the process...

-dave
07/01/2012 02:18:53 AM · #23
Beautiful photos and great tutorial!
I am starting with this (i own a Nikon 5100), so I hope you do not mind some very basic (and many)questions.

1) Would this reverse rings work with the Nikon 50mm f/1.4 AF D ( I suppose the answer is yes as the Filter Thread is still 52mm)
2) IN the tutorial it is said that "You lose the ability to focus when reverse mounting a lens". Does this happen also using extension tubes?
3) With a kit 18-55 vr lens that does not have an aperture ring "you have to keep the lever on the lens' mount that controls the aperture open by hand". I am sorry for the basic question , but how do you do that?
4) And finally , Would you recommend using reversing rings in a manual 50 mm lens over using extension tubes in a 18-55 kit ?
thanks a lot in advance and sorry for the basic English

07/01/2012 11:06:22 AM · #24
Originally posted by serRuiz:

1) Would this reverse rings work with the Nikon 50mm f/1.4 AF D ( I suppose the answer is yes as the Filter Thread is still 52mm)

You should be able to reverse this particular lens without any additional hardware. For lenses where the thread size is different, just use the appropriate size Step-up (or step-down ring)


Originally posted by serRuiz:

2) IN the tutorial it is said that "You lose the ability to focus when reverse mounting a lens". Does this happen also using extension tubes?


You do to some extent. The range of possible focus becomes very narrow. The more extension tubes you add, the narrower the focus range possible, and the closer the near-focus limit becomes. You focus by moving the camera forward and back to get the subject in focus.

Originally posted by serRuiz:

3) With a kit 18-55 vr lens that does not have an aperture ring "you have to keep the lever on the lens' mount that controls the aperture open by hand". I am sorry for the basic question , but how do you do that?


You just reach around the front and move the lever. Now, that will open the aperture fully, which probably is not what you want. There is, I believe, a way to get a specific aperture set, but someone with more knowledge of the behavior of the Nikon G lenses will have to chime in. I'm a Canon guy :-)

Originally posted by serRuiz:

4) And finally , Would you recommend using reversing rings in a manual 50 mm lens over using extension tubes in a 18-55 kit ?
thanks a lot in advance and sorry for the basic English


The reversed 50mm will give you higher magnification than the 18-55 with extension tubes, so if that is what you are after, it might be the way to go. It will be more difficult to use, and less flexible. With the 18-55, you can choose how much extension to add, and thus change the magnification. The reversed 50mm will have essentially a fixed magnification.
By the way, no need to apologize for your English, it's quite good.
07/02/2012 07:38:17 AM · #25
i have a budget minded friend looking to get into macro, does anyone know of an older canon mount with a manual aperture ring that would be affordable to them?
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