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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Anyone know what this technique is called?
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09/10/2008 06:26:31 PM · #1
Hello,

I was following the Strobist blog. Recently he featured a photographer name Dustin Snipes. He did a fantastic layout of basketball pictures that are just terrific IMHO.

Does anyone know what the technique is to get that "chromy" look? I'm sorry, I'm not very good at describing what stands out about the pictures besides the awesome poses - but it is really cool!

Thanks,

Shane
09/10/2008 06:33:45 PM · #2
oh I totally agree with you ... those are fantastic! thanks for sharing the link ... wish I had info on how to achieve that look, but you can bet I'll be checking this thread to see if anyone posts some assistance ..
09/10/2008 06:34:13 PM · #3
You can achieve that look using lucisart but you can also do it in PS but it will take longer and more techniques are involved.

It is also known as the Dave Hill style.
09/10/2008 06:44:59 PM · #4
I would have thought that most of the work is in the lighting rather then the post processing.

Dave Hill uses similar lighting setups looking at the initial shots of the strobe setups.


09/10/2008 06:46:29 PM · #5
I would venture to say that he actually gets very close to that look right out of the camera. This look is more about the lighting than the post processing. He's using (relatively) powerful lights in that setup shot (Alien bees i think) which allows him to control the ambient light very easily, and shape the highlights and shadows with his strobes.
09/10/2008 06:47:52 PM · #6
Originally posted by kevip6:

I would have thought that most of the work is in the lighting rather then the post processing.

Dave Hill uses similar lighting setups looking at the initial shots of the strobe setups.


Yes the lighting is key but you can't get that look straight out of the camera.

ETA: If you think you can then show me ...

Message edited by author 2008-09-10 18:51:28.
09/10/2008 06:53:13 PM · #7
Anyone notice the title of the article (and web page header) has a typo ...? ;-)
09/10/2008 06:55:35 PM · #8
Originally posted by thegrandwazoo:

Originally posted by kevip6:

I would have thought that most of the work is in the lighting rather then the post processing.

Dave Hill uses similar lighting setups looking at the initial shots of the strobe setups.


Yes the lighting is key but you can't get that look straight out of the camera.

ETA: If you think you can then show me ...


This is from photog Blair Bunting:

Right out of the camera

' . substr('//bp0.blogger.com/_Bf48JKOl5HQ/SHvDFzf0HzI/AAAAAAAAAqM/pk9Zs10uQLc/s320/HerringRAW.jpg', strrpos('//bp0.blogger.com/_Bf48JKOl5HQ/SHvDFzf0HzI/AAAAAAAAAqM/pk9Zs10uQLc/s320/HerringRAW.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Processed

' . substr('//bp1.blogger.com/_Bf48JKOl5HQ/SHvETCew9II/AAAAAAAAAqk/RlZ3VJZUM4Q/s320/bigpic.jpg', strrpos('//bp1.blogger.com/_Bf48JKOl5HQ/SHvETCew9II/AAAAAAAAAqk/RlZ3VJZUM4Q/s320/bigpic.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

More Info on light setup here

09/10/2008 07:00:10 PM · #9
Like I said yes the lighting is key but to achieve the final look it must be processed. Depending on how much of that look you want will determine how much post is used. Lucisart is the fastest way to achieve that look. Not everyone has 4-8 strobes at their disposal.
09/10/2008 07:00:15 PM · #10
Originally posted by Pipe_Dream:

Originally posted by thegrandwazoo:

Originally posted by kevip6:

I would have thought that most of the work is in the lighting rather then the post processing.

Dave Hill uses similar lighting setups looking at the initial shots of the strobe setups.


Yes the lighting is key but you can't get that look straight out of the camera.

ETA: If you think you can then show me ...


This is from photog Blair Bunting:

Right out of the camera

' . substr('//bp0.blogger.com/_Bf48JKOl5HQ/SHvDFzf0HzI/AAAAAAAAAqM/pk9Zs10uQLc/s320/HerringRAW.jpg', strrpos('//bp0.blogger.com/_Bf48JKOl5HQ/SHvDFzf0HzI/AAAAAAAAAqM/pk9Zs10uQLc/s320/HerringRAW.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Processed

' . substr('//bp1.blogger.com/_Bf48JKOl5HQ/SHvETCew9II/AAAAAAAAAqk/RlZ3VJZUM4Q/s320/bigpic.jpg', strrpos('//bp1.blogger.com/_Bf48JKOl5HQ/SHvETCew9II/AAAAAAAAAqk/RlZ3VJZUM4Q/s320/bigpic.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

More Info on light setup here



What this goes to show is that the technique is dependent on both lighting *and* post. Like most photos we take. Or like it *should* be in most photos we take ;P

The initial lighting is key to giving the photographer the base in which to finalize the shot with post-processing steps dependent on the lighting.

Now I've written two sentences that mean exactly the same thing.

Basically, in post processing, they've just increased the HDR lighting important in the style.
09/10/2008 07:09:03 PM · #11
Originally posted by thegrandwazoo:

Like I said yes the lighting is key but to achieve the final look it must be processed. Depending on how much of that look you want will determine how much post is used. Lucisart is the fastest way to achieve that look. Not everyone has 4-8 strobes at their disposal.


You DID say that you can't get this look straight out of camera, I'm simply making the point that you CAN get close if you have a ton of lights, obviously not everyone has a ton of lights (including myself)... but it's possible. In the example I posted above, thats probably a 2 min PP job to get the final look because his lighting was set-up to yeild those results.
09/10/2008 07:49:52 PM · #12
Originally posted by Pipe_Dream:

Originally posted by thegrandwazoo:

Like I said yes the lighting is key but to achieve the final look it must be processed. Depending on how much of that look you want will determine how much post is used. Lucisart is the fastest way to achieve that look. Not everyone has 4-8 strobes at their disposal.


You DID say that you can't get this look straight out of camera, I'm simply making the point that you CAN get close if you have a ton of lights, obviously not everyone has a ton of lights (including myself)... but it's possible. In the example I posted above, thats probably a 2 min PP job to get the final look because his lighting was set-up to yeild those results.


You can't it all needs to be processed regardless of the amount of time. And Lucisart takes less then 2 minutes. You can think that this is achievable straight out of the camera, that is fine but false.

Message edited by author 2008-09-10 19:53:09.
09/10/2008 08:40:24 PM · #13
If you say so. I think the example clearly illustrates what's possible just with good light, you may not. Im not debating that PP is necessary, because I think it is. All I'm saying is this "style" that the OP is referring to is not achieved with post processing, but light set-up.

I'm done
09/10/2008 08:53:36 PM · #14
Originally posted by Pipe_Dream:

... I think the example clearly illustrates what's possible just with good light, you may not ...
I'm done


I am not arguing that light doesn't make the magic I'm a photog that would be kinda stupid but you can achieve great things in post. Lucisart makes that easier. And Dave Hill absolutely post processes his images and he is also excellent with light.

Message edited by author 2008-09-10 20:54:25.
09/10/2008 10:50:41 PM · #15
Without even reading past the first post. After seeing Dustin's examples and scanning most of replies, one word came to my mouth, LucisArt. He did mention the small amount of time spent on PP each of them. Oh definitely, as always the closer the results "Out of the camera", the less manipulating afterwards.

Great results with less efforts is a goal to shoot for.

I've checked out LucisArt a week ago. I haven't really tried much, but some of the extremes can be toned down by layer settings.
09/11/2008 12:18:04 AM · #16
Hey, I just wanted to post real quick and say that it was all done in photoshop CS3. I have never or will ever use Lucisart. Im not saying its not a good program. Its just not my cup of tea. Sorry for the short post here. I am on vacation in Hawaii for the next week!

Thanks for reading my blog!

Dustin
09/11/2008 12:21:52 AM · #17
Heheheh.
09/11/2008 12:53:36 AM · #18
Originally posted by thegrandwazoo:

You can achieve that look using lucisart but you can also do it in PS but it will take longer and more techniques are involved.

It is also known as the Dave Hill style.


I guess one name for it is the DaveHill Style, LucisArt Style, or you can call it DustinAaron Style. Create your own Action Scripts in PS and save yourself some cash.
09/11/2008 01:21:36 AM · #19
Originally posted by justamistere:

Originally posted by thegrandwazoo:

You can achieve that look using lucisart but you can also do it in PS but it will take longer and more techniques are involved.

It is also known as the Dave Hill style.


I guess one name for it is the DaveHill Style, LucisArt Style, or you can call it DustinAaron Style. Create your own Action Scripts in PS and save yourself some cash.


Yeah LOL don't get me wrong I am not a pitch man for lucisart I don't even own it. Just sayin'. :-D

ETA: One of the first threads on the topic here.

Message edited by author 2008-09-11 01:30:57.
09/11/2008 09:24:00 AM · #20
Great discussion! Thanks for the link to Dave Hill - those seem surreal and enjoyable. Dustin's photo's walk that fine line in reality IMHO.
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