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08/24/2008 09:56:47 AM · #1
Post your comments, questions, and reviews for...

'Sharpening Halos And How To Hide Them '
by Brad

View this tutorial here.
08/24/2008 10:02:50 AM · #2
Nice job Brad. Good tips to remember.
08/24/2008 10:03:59 AM · #3
Excellent easy to follow tutorial, Brad! Nice job! I learnt something!!! : )
08/24/2008 10:07:30 AM · #4
Very easy to understand. The graphics are a big help. I need something like this too lol. Thanks!
08/24/2008 10:07:51 AM · #5
cool
08/24/2008 10:10:02 AM · #6
Wow, what a great tip. Easily understood on the first read. Short and to the point. Nice job.

08/24/2008 10:10:11 AM · #7
Another method to add to your bag of tricks (because, in Photoshop, there are a million ways to skin a cat):

1) Create a new layer
2) Apply a 1-pixel Gaussian Blur to that layer
3) Alt-Click the mask icon (this uses black to hide the entire layer)
4) Now with a white brush, simply paint the haloed outline of the subject (vary opacity of the brush as necessary)

It's fairly quick process. Steps 1-3 take little time at all, and step 4 moves along a lot faster than using the clone tool.

08/24/2008 10:31:40 AM · #8
Excellent tip, thanks Brad
08/24/2008 10:39:14 AM · #9
Originally posted by dwterry:

Another method to add to your bag of tricks (because, in Photoshop, there are a million ways to skin a cat):

1) Create a new layer
2) Apply a 1-pixel Gaussian Blur to that layer
3) Alt-Click the mask icon (this uses black to hide the entire layer)
4) Now with a white brush, simply paint the haloed outline of the subject (vary opacity of the brush as necessary)

It's fairly quick process. Steps 1-3 take little time at all, and step 4 moves along a lot faster than using the clone tool.


I do it the other way around. I copy the layer before the sharpening. After I sharpen, I add a white mask to it(click on the mask icon, no Alt), and use black brush to hide all places where sharpening caused artifacts, like haloes and such. Indeed works much faster and cleaner than cloning.
08/24/2008 10:47:36 AM · #10
If it is not for DPC use a history brush set on a state before the sharpening with 50% effectivity or something. Does the job in half a minute.

08/24/2008 11:26:06 AM · #11
Great tip Brad! Thanks for sharing ...
10/24/2008 01:54:03 AM · #12
Great tip Brad. I had this problem so many times but didn't know how to deal with it. I tried hands on, and it works great!! Thanks.
10/24/2008 01:57:02 AM · #13
Originally posted by Azrifel:

If it is not for DPC use a history brush set on a state before the sharpening with 50% effectivity or something. Does the job in half a minute.


Why only if not for DPC?

And thanks Brad, I've always done the cloning thing, and that's a pain!

Message edited by author 2008-10-24 01:57:39.
10/24/2008 04:21:38 AM · #14
good tutorial. only god knows how many times i pulled my hair trying to remove those halos caused by excessive USM
10/24/2008 09:09:15 AM · #15
Quick, clean, & easy.

Nicely done, thanx!
10/24/2008 09:34:35 AM · #16
That's a very good tutorial.

My latest method for sharpening is to use Genuine Fractals to resize (larger and smaller) and sharpen in one step. You have to push the sharpening really hard to get halos or oversharpen.
10/24/2008 09:38:41 AM · #17
Just what I needed. Thanks Brad.
10/24/2008 10:44:17 AM · #18
Option 423, sharpen the image and use the history brush at the opacity of your choice to brush the sharpening off the ugly bits.
10/24/2008 11:14:42 AM · #19
Originally posted by violinist123:

Option 423, sharpen the image and use the history brush at the opacity of your choice to brush the sharpening off the ugly bits.

There's one teeny tiny detail about this.
If you have cropped or resized the image, the history tool will not work.
10/24/2008 02:21:15 PM · #20
Originally posted by Brad:

Originally posted by violinist123:

Option 423, sharpen the image and use the history brush at the opacity of your choice to brush the sharpening off the ugly bits.

There's one teeny tiny detail about this.
If you have cropped or resized the image, the history tool will not work.


You shouldn't be sharpening before you've resized for target output, but yes that is a "gotcha".
10/24/2008 03:24:02 PM · #21
Originally posted by violinist123:

You shouldn't be sharpening before you've resized for target output, but yes that is a "gotcha".


That's not always true. It is *generally* true for print-sized images, but for the kind of gonzo shrinking we do an DPC, you can encounter "information problems" if you sharpen after resizing to 640 pixels. A lot depends on how sharp the output was that you are working from. In my case, I work in RAW with sharpness and contrast both set to their lowest settings, and do all my sharpening in CS3, where I have much more control over it. If I resize these images before doing any sharpening at all, I sometimes lose information altogether in the finer details.

R.
01/30/2009 04:09:31 PM · #22
The tutorial was great. Now what caused the halo and what lighting and subject placement could've prevented it?

I guess, that the green "Fringe" from green paper background can be gotten rid of in a similar fashion., right?
03/17/2009 05:48:39 AM · #23
Excellent tutorial. Good info and explained well.
03/17/2009 09:12:56 AM · #24
Originally posted by LevT:

Originally posted by dwterry:

Another method to add to your bag of tricks (because, in Photoshop, there are a million ways to skin a cat):

1) Create a new layer
2) Apply a 1-pixel Gaussian Blur to that layer
3) Alt-Click the mask icon (this uses black to hide the entire layer)
4) Now with a white brush, simply paint the haloed outline of the subject (vary opacity of the brush as necessary)

It's fairly quick process. Steps 1-3 take little time at all, and step 4 moves along a lot faster than using the clone tool.


I do it the other way around. I copy the layer before the sharpening. After I sharpen, I add a white mask to it(click on the mask icon, no Alt), and use black brush to hide all places where sharpening caused artifacts, like haloes and such. Indeed works much faster and cleaner than cloning.


Thats what I do... But I have to try the clone tool on "Darken" for sure...
01/09/2011 10:42:28 PM · #25
Good tutorial. I have used the clone tool for this, but didn't know about the different modes for the tool. The darken mode, will definitely make it easier. Thanks.
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