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04/04/2004 05:42:10 PM · #1
Post your comments, questions, and reviews for...

'Fixing Tilted Horizons'
by Gordon

View this tutorial here.
04/06/2004 01:40:27 PM · #2
One of the most useful tips ever, but I already came across it in a magazine, so I did not rate your tutorial. Good explanation though.

You might want to add that you can also draw a vertical line, for example along a building, and then PS will automatically show the degrees to get it perfectly vertical. (it will not make the error to rotate it near to 90 degrees and put the building on its side).


04/06/2004 01:59:20 PM · #3
agreed, this is the only way :)
04/06/2004 02:31:24 PM · #4
good how to Gordon, but I am REAL lazy and just move the photo so the line I need to straighten is near the top, botton or the side of my image editing program and I use the rotate tool until the horizon is straigh with the edge of the program, or the building is straight....

James "Giving lazy tips since 1985"


04/06/2004 02:41:50 PM · #5
Originally posted by jab119:

good how to Gordon, but I am REAL lazy and just move the photo so the line I need to straighten is near the top, botton or the side of my image editing program and I use the rotate tool until the horizon is straigh with the edge of the program, or the building is straight....

James "Giving lazy tips since 1985"


but then you have to guess and repeat the action a few times until you get it right, don't you ?

With this tip you get it right first time. Now who's lazy ?
04/06/2004 02:43:40 PM · #6
It would be nice to see a finished (polished) product. Just crop it and call it "after".
04/06/2004 02:56:58 PM · #7
Originally posted by willem:



You might want to add that you can also draw a vertical line, for example along a building, and then PS will automatically show the degrees to get it perfectly vertical. (it will not make the error to rotate it near to 90 degrees and put the building on its side).


It already does.

04/06/2004 03:19:09 PM · #8
Covered nicely here //www.photoworkshop.com/registered/softwarecinema/julianne_kost.html as well as some others that might be of interest to the group.

Dick
04/06/2004 03:38:24 PM · #9
Originally posted by Gordon:

Originally posted by willem:



You might want to add that you can also draw a vertical line, for example along a building, and then PS will automatically show the degrees to get it perfectly vertical. (it will not make the error to rotate it near to 90 degrees and put the building on its side).


It already does.


I am so sorry, I was reading to fast.....
04/06/2004 03:53:08 PM · #10
Originally posted by willem:

Originally posted by jab119:

good how to Gordon, but I am REAL lazy and just move the photo so the line I need to straighten is near the top, botton or the side of my image editing program and I use the rotate tool until the horizon is straigh with the edge of the program, or the building is straight....

James "Giving lazy tips since 1985"


but then you have to guess and repeat the action a few times until you get it right, don't you ?

With this tip you get it right first time. Now who's lazy ?


Na I get it right the first time, besides I dont use photo shop ( i have it but really dont use it, only once a month maybe)

James
04/06/2004 04:43:52 PM · #11
Neat. The things PS can do! How do they think these things up? And after that, how are we supposed to find them, and then find all the alternate uses for them?

chris

PS i used to crop and rotte the cop to line up with a windows window edge. this is mucho better.
04/06/2004 04:57:32 PM · #12
and thanks to EddyG for actually putting this on the site.
04/06/2004 05:10:43 PM · #13
I don't have PhotoShop; I've been using Paint Shop Pro 8. Do you know whether it has a similar method?

Oh, also, is there a way to avoid losing details when you rotate? I have a shot I love that's way crooked; when I rotate, the faces go all blobby. :)

Message edited by author 2004-04-06 17:11:55.
04/06/2004 05:21:40 PM · #14
That's well explained, but in PS Elements at least, all you have to do is turn on the overlay grid, then free rotate layer. It's then a simple matter to align the horizon with the grid.

I also use the grid with vertical lines when no horizon available, and when there's a need to correct perspective.

By the way, are there instructions/rules for submitting a tutorial? There doesn't appear to be any "online" way to do it. By your thanks to EddyG, it appears you just write one in a word processor format and submit it? Might be good to have a style sheet and some instructions.
04/06/2004 05:23:57 PM · #15
Originally posted by nshapiro:


By the way, are there instructions/rules for submitting a tutorial? There doesn't appear to be any "online" way to do it. By your thanks to EddyG, it appears you just write one in a word processor format and submit it? Might be good to have a style sheet and some instructions.


I've been asking for that for years. The current way seems to be to complain about it publically for long enough then someone does it for you ;)

Btw, the reason why the measure tool way works better than free rotating is that it works in fractions of a degree rotations, which are hard to get right manually - I find it just easier to mark the start and end of the line and let the software work it out for me, rather than trying to eyeball it.
04/06/2004 05:40:53 PM · #16
Simple technique, but something I was unaware of. Thanks for the tutorial
04/06/2004 06:38:29 PM · #17
I think that's a fine explanation/demonstration of that technique.

I personally prefer to crop and rotate at the same time. After drawing an arbitrary crop marquee, I place one of the sides next to a horizontal or vertical line, rotate the crop box until it lines up with that element, and then drag the crop box back out into the desired position. Even with the "play" in freely rotating the box, I can usually get it as well-aligned as I can with the measuring tool. I will sometimes even resample (by using the fixed-sized crop option) at the same time to save another step.

For extra variation with this technique, you can move the "handle" in the center of the photo around to any point to change the axis of rotation.
04/06/2004 06:48:28 PM · #18
Horizons that are not level is a basic flaw seen in images at DPC all the time. Your simple, easy and time saving correction method is useful and needed.
04/06/2004 09:01:34 PM · #19
Originally posted by cmangis:

I don't have PhotoShop; I've been using Paint Shop Pro 8. Do you know whether it has a similar method?

Oh, also, is there a way to avoid losing details when you rotate? I have a shot I love that's way crooked; when I rotate, the faces go all blobby. :)


Paint Shop Pro 8 has a "Straighten" tool. The icon is a square with a curved arrow around it. Select it, and a horizontal line with handles on the ends appears. Drag it and its handles to align with a horizontal or vertical line in your image. Select the right mode (horizontal, vertical, or auto), and click the Check mark to straighten your image.
04/06/2004 09:12:08 PM · #20
Originally posted by GeneralE:

I think that's a fine explanation/demonstration of that technique.

I personally prefer to crop and rotate at the same time. After drawing an arbitrary crop marquee, I place one of the sides next to a horizontal or vertical line, rotate the crop box until it lines up with that element, and then drag the crop box back out into the desired position. Even with the "play" in freely rotating the box, I can usually get it as well-aligned as I can with the measuring tool. I will sometimes even resample (by using the fixed-sized crop option) at the same time to save another step.

For extra variation with this technique, you can move the "handle" in the center of the photo around to any point to change the axis of rotation.


I do the same. It's quick and easy, and it works in Elements (which doesn't have the Measure tool). The Measure tool can be more exact if you zoom in on the desired area first, but you have to use full Photoshop.
04/06/2004 09:22:19 PM · #21
Originally posted by Gordon:

Post your comments, questions, and reviews for...

'Fixing Tilted Horizons'
by Gordon

View this tutorial here.


Thanks for the tip!
04/06/2004 09:39:46 PM · #22
Originally posted by dr rick:

Originally posted by cmangis:

I don't have PhotoShop; I've been using Paint Shop Pro 8. Do you know whether it has a similar method?

Oh, also, is there a way to avoid losing details when you rotate? I have a shot I love that's way crooked; when I rotate, the faces go all blobby. :)


Paint Shop Pro 8 has a "Straighten" tool. The icon is a square with a curved arrow around it. Select it, and a horizontal line with handles on the ends appears. Drag it and its handles to align with a horizontal or vertical line in your image. Select the right mode (horizontal, vertical, or auto), and click the Check mark to straighten your image.


Thanks, that's great!
01/18/2005 09:41:05 AM · #23
thanks, it was really useful.
01/18/2005 10:02:40 AM · #24
Drink less?
12/04/2005 05:15:35 PM · #25
just tried this for the first time. It worked perfectly. Very useful as I must have one leg longer than the other.
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