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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> 120 Film ???'s
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06/13/2008 11:58:24 AM · #1
Ok. I've shot film (35mm) with a SLR from 1990 to 2004. I've never used anything other than 35mm. I have this old camera I've cleaned up and would like to run some film thru it for fun. From what I've read it uses 120 film that produces 6x6 prints.

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/862/120/679911.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/862/120/679911.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Would this film be appropriate? There are other types available in 120, I'm asking about the 120 film type in general.

Ilford XP-2 Super Sharp, Fine Grain, Black and White Professional Film, ISO 400, 120 Size

Next is getting the film developed for prints. I've looked around a little (internet search, etc...) and it looks like 120 film can be mailed in for processing. Curious however that the print sizes at some places is 4x4. ??? For example ==> Dwayne's Photo: B&W Film Developing and Prints.

Any suggestions on other mail-in film processing choices? I'd prefer to go with someone major.

Thanks in advance! :-)

Barry

06/13/2008 12:16:26 PM · #2
Lots of nice options for black and white film. Ilford Delta 100 is one that I've tried and I've liked the results.
Personally I am going to learn how to develop my own and then scan it. I've seen developer tanks etc on ebay for cheap and the chemicals themselves aren't that bad for price. Of course that is for black and white. Color or slide film is a bit harder from what I understand.

Ilford has a good tutorial on b&w development but I can't find the darn thing...
Edit:
found it! //www.ilfordphoto.com/applications/page.asp?n=31

Message edited by author 2008-06-13 12:33:47.
06/13/2008 12:23:56 PM · #3
IMO, that film should be fine. One thing I've learned to watch out for is to make sure the film can be processed by C-41, which that one can be. The 6x6 refers to the negative size, and is measured in cm, which roughly translates to about 2 inch negs. You'll get 12 exposures.
That film lab looks to have good prices for processing and developing, which would be 4 inch square prints. You might try some local labs. There are a few that will still develop and process 120.

Good luck.
06/13/2008 12:43:58 PM · #4
Thanks for the info guys. Much appreciated.

Side note - I think it's pretty cool that you can still find film to put thru a camera that's half-a-century old!
06/13/2008 01:06:49 PM · #5
Be advised that you may also shoot 220 film which is the same as 120 only twice as much of it. 24 exp. instead of 12 exp. I used a lot of it in my Mamiya 645 (6x45) and the 67 (6x7) back in 1978. I love medium format! Have a ball.

also, as I remember, or think I do, Yashica made add on telephoto and wide angle lenses.

Message edited by author 2008-06-13 13:08:28.
06/13/2008 01:07:52 PM · #6
Originally posted by dsray:

Be advised that you may also shoot 220 film which is the same as 120 only twice as much of it. 24 exp. instead of 12 exp. I used a lot of it in my Mamiya 645 (6x45) and the 67 (6x7) back in 1978. I love medium format! Have a ball.

Thanks! Didn't know that. :-)
06/13/2008 01:21:14 PM · #7
Originally posted by dsray:

Be advised that you may also shoot 220 film which is the same as 120 only twice as much of it. 24 exp. instead of 12 exp.


I don't have personal experience with this, but if I remember correctly, 220 rolls are larger than 120, and may not fit in your camera. Check your owner's manual if you have one, or search online for a copy of one. You should be able to find something for free.
06/13/2008 01:36:50 PM · #8
I have a roll of Portra 400NC that is expired you are welcome to have...for cost of mailing. The photo lab gave it to me years ago when a roll I submitted for developing, did not produce any pictures. I never shot 120 before. It is dated 10/2003 and has been stored in the refrigerator.
06/13/2008 01:39:12 PM · #9
Whatever you end up shooting, you have to post the shots on DPC. That would be really cool.
06/13/2008 01:52:58 PM · #10
Originally posted by twilson944:

... Check your owner's manual if you have one, or search online for a copy of one. You should be able to find something for free.

No manual...but did find this just now ==> Yashica A :-)
06/13/2008 01:55:19 PM · #11
Originally posted by luv2photo:

... It is dated 10/2003 and has been stored in the refrigerator.

...and I thought our refrig needing cleaning out! :-D

Stop! No flaming PLEASE. That was a joke. He-he. Thanks for offering up the film. Very much appreciated.
06/13/2008 01:56:19 PM · #12
Originally posted by Fromac:

Whatever you end up shooting, you have to post the shots on DPC. That would be really cool.

What, you want me to dust off the scanner?! :-D
06/13/2008 07:50:10 PM · #13
Originally posted by glad2badad:

Originally posted by twilson944:

... Check your owner's manual if you have one, or search online for a copy of one. You should be able to find something for free.

No manual...but did find this just now ==> Yashica A :-)


Looks like that should work. I'm guessing since it's not listed in the manual, it won't take 220 film. Have fun, and let's see the photos.
06/14/2008 12:29:13 AM · #14
Originally posted by dsray:

Be advised that you may also shoot 220 film which is the same as 120 only twice as much of it. 24 exp. instead of 12 exp. I used a lot of it in my Mamiya 645 (6x45) and the 67 (6x7) back in 1978. I love medium format! Have a ball.

also, as I remember, or think I do, Yashica made add on telephoto and wide angle lenses.


I believe that you can't actually use 220 film in the Yashica-A, it only works on 120. 120 film has backing paper, 220 doesn't, with consequences:
- If your camera has a window for showing the frame number on 120 film (from the backing paper), your 220 film will be fogged.
- The backing plate needs to be moved between 120 and 220 film so that the film is on the focal plane.
Also, cameras with mechanical frame counters might not let you shoot more than 12 exposures on a film.

The Yashica 124 TLRs were designed to handle both 120 and 220 film. There's a control to change which moves the backing plate. The older Yashica TLRs designed for 120 only won't have that.

But yes, you should enjoy using the camera; TLRs are fun, people find them more of a novelty (and less scary) than SLRs, and you can sometimes get away with some urban photography that is harder than with an SLR. However you will get lots of people saying "look, it's a Box Brownie" even though it isn't.

XP2 would be a nice film to put through (very forgiving film, and C-41 developing is cheaper than B&W). I've shot quite a bit of Provia with very nice results, also some print film. If I recall correctly, Fuji and Kodak are still both making print and slide film in 120/220 and Ilford still has several B&W films (both XP2 and regular B&W). If you're feeling experimental you could try picking up some infrared film and a suitable filter, because with a TLR you can still see what you're shooting!

Hmmm, suddenly I'm feeling a bit more inspired to pull my Yashica out again. :)
06/14/2008 08:52:43 AM · #15
Originally posted by paddles:

C-41 developing is cheaper than B&W.


Would you happen to know of any places to get true B&W developed and processed? I made the "mistake" of purchasing a 5-pack of T-Max to use in my Graflex 22' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/764/120/606092.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/764/120/606092.jpg', '/') + 1) . 'and now I'm kind of stuck.
06/14/2008 09:06:16 AM · #16
Many professional labs still process 120 film. I still use my Hasselblads and get film developed here in Toronto regularly. A good lab is Colourgenics Inc. Here is a link to their price list. Colourgenics

Originally posted by twilson944:

Originally posted by paddles:

C-41 developing is cheaper than B&W.


Would you happen to know of any places to get true B&W developed and processed? I made the "mistake" of purchasing a 5-pack of T-Max to use in my Graflex 22' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/764/120/606092.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/764/120/606092.jpg', '/') + 1) . 'and now I'm kind of stuck.
06/14/2008 10:24:22 AM · #17
I didn't realize there was this much interest in this older style of camera. That's kinda cool! :-)

I noticed a guy using one a couple years ago at a Renaissaince (sp?) fair and I thought it was interesting how he was getting right in the mix for some good candid shots. Holding the camera at waist level it wasn't as intimidating to the people he was photographing. Kind of like what paddles mentioned about the urban photography.
06/14/2008 06:44:22 PM · #18
Picked up a Ciro-flex a while ago for $20. Shot slide and B&W with it for fun. Pretty neat without spend $1,000 on medium format stuff.

Pretty fun.
06/15/2008 12:46:24 AM · #19
I'd personally steer away from the C-41 B&W films. They're developed with a color process and can't achieve a true black as well as real B&W film. And true B&W negatives are quite forgiving as well. I've become a big fan of the Ilford B&W films. And for a little extra fun, the Ilford Delta 3200 can yield some very cool low light images. The grain on the ISO 3200 film is HUGE. At least for 35mm that is. I'd be interested to see scans of 120 Delta 3200.
06/15/2008 05:19:24 AM · #20
Originally posted by WCpilot:

I'd personally steer away from the C-41 B&W films. They're developed with a color process and can't achieve a true black as well as real B&W film. And true B&W negatives are quite forgiving as well. I've become a big fan of the Ilford B&W films. And for a little extra fun, the Ilford Delta 3200 can yield some very cool low light images. The grain on the ISO 3200 film is HUGE. At least for 35mm that is. I'd be interested to see scans of 120 Delta 3200.


The minilab I used to use printed my XP2 films onto B&W paper instead of colour paper, which gave me the true blacks. (Yes, agreed that it's very difficult not to get a colour cast from XP2 on colour paper.) I didn't mean to suggest that true B&W films are not forgiving. Some are, some aren't; but XP2 is (an example of) a forgiving film. I've managed to get some usable images even three stops underexposed.

I know T-Max has its fans, but I too have always enjoyed using Ilford's B&W films.

I've been known to carry Delta 3200 (particularly useful when you want to get film manually inspected at airports!) but only in 35mm, I haven't ever used the 120 version.
06/15/2008 05:59:26 AM · #21
Originally posted by glad2badad:

Thanks for the info guys. Much appreciated.

Side note - I think it's pretty cool that you can still find film to put thru a camera that's half-a-century old!


Well, I think it's great that you're doing this. About 12 years ago, I shot a roll of film through a camera that was made in 1917. Not great results, but interesting nonetheless. ;-Þ
06/15/2008 09:15:15 AM · #22
Originally posted by paddles:


The minilab I used to use printed my XP2 films onto B&W paper instead of colour paper, which gave me the true blacks.


Ah, that would be a good solution to that problem.

I've heard many good things about T-Max as well. But the darkroom I learned in didn't have any T-Max developer, so I just used mostly Ilford films instead.

Kodak Plus-X is another standard for B&W if you're interested. Oh, and I'm currently in the process of shooting my first roll of Provia
06/15/2008 02:27:51 PM · #23
Originally posted by WCpilot:

Originally posted by paddles:


The minilab I used to use printed my XP2 films onto B&W paper instead of colour paper, which gave me the true blacks.


Ah, that would be a good solution to that problem.



That's all fine and dandy, provided you have C-41 film. Thanks for the link ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' Morgan. Any other suggestions for labs that could print T-Max that aren't outrageously expensive?
06/15/2008 05:11:59 PM · #24
In my opinion, there is no problem getting 120 film developed. It is not likely to happen with a consumer oriented lab, but here in Toronto, there are at least 20 or more commercial labs that offer these services. So, check in your community for commercial labs. Major locations, where commercial photography is common - Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and many more will all have commercial labs that still provide these services.

I have all of the equipment to do it myself in the basement. I develop the black and white negative film, then scan it with my Nikon 8000 scanner into the computer. It is an ideal combination. I send the colour development out, but still scan and print here at home. A 6x6 scan is remarkable at 4,000 dpi.

Cheers,
Michael

Originally posted by twilson944:

Originally posted by WCpilot:

Originally posted by paddles:


The minilab I used to use printed my XP2 films onto B&W paper instead of colour paper, which gave me the true blacks.


Ah, that would be a good solution to that problem.



That's all fine and dandy, provided you have C-41 film. Thanks for the link ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' Morgan. Any other suggestions for labs that could print T-Max that aren't outrageously expensive?
06/15/2008 10:12:03 PM · #25
Originally posted by Morgan:

In my opinion, there is no problem getting 120 film developed. It is not likely to happen with a consumer oriented lab, but here in Toronto, there are at least 20 or more commercial labs that offer these services. So, check in your community for commercial labs. Major locations, where commercial photography is common - Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and many more will all have commercial labs that still provide these services.

I have all of the equipment to do it myself in the basement. I develop the black and white negative film, then scan it with my Nikon 8000 scanner into the computer. It is an ideal combination. I send the colour development out, but still scan and print here at home. A 6x6 scan is remarkable at 4,000 dpi.

Cheers,
Michael

Originally posted by twilson944:

Originally posted by WCpilot:

Originally posted by paddles:


The minilab I used to use printed my XP2 films onto B&W paper instead of colour paper, which gave me the true blacks.


Ah, that would be a good solution to that problem.



That's all fine and dandy, provided you have C-41 film. Thanks for the link ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' Morgan. Any other suggestions for labs that could print T-Max that aren't outrageously expensive?


Perhaps I need to be more specific in my request.

Could anyone recommend any online/mail-order commercial labs that are capable of developing T-Max 120 B&W negative film?

' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' Morgan, I'm not trying to be snotty, so please don't take this reply as such. I agree with and understand what you're saying about consumer v. commercial labs. The best I have in my (relatively) local area is a camera shop/lab that will develop and process C-41 120 film. My problem is that I have 1 roll of film still in camera, and 4 more rolls left to either throw or give away. I've not yet been able to find a lab through online searches that can develop the film I've purchased, and the lab was not able to offer any solutions.

Or am I totally missing the point about you having all the equipment in your basement? Is that an offer? :)
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