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DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Friday discussion un-contacted tribes
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05/30/2008 10:23:36 AM · #1
Read the article and discuss. //news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7426794.stm

The photos are just amazing (if real)!

My dilemma, do we treat these people like endangered animals and protect them? Or do we treat them like human beings and introduce them to the world? And if they were in the US Id want them to pay land use fees and taxes as Id have to pay if I lived in the woods (thats a joke!)

Or are the photos a hoax and the BBC got punked?
05/30/2008 10:25:50 AM · #2
Originally posted by LoudDog:

... Or are the photos a hoax and the BBC got punked?

I wondered the same thing.

If the photos are real, it's kind of interesting to note the style of dwellings that they've built.
05/30/2008 10:31:17 AM · #3
Captain Kirk says, "Obey the Prime Directive."
05/30/2008 10:32:41 AM · #4
Originally posted by LoudDog:

Or do we treat them like human beings and introduce them to the world? And if they were in the US Id want them to pay land use fees and taxes as Id have to pay if I lived in the woods (thats a joke!)

Yeah, let's give them credit cards and teach them it's shameful to be naked.
05/30/2008 10:32:56 AM · #5
Originally posted by Strikeslip:

Captain Kirk says, "Obey the Prime Directive."

All of the New World would still be "un-contacted tribes" if we actually did that.
05/30/2008 10:37:32 AM · #6
Originally posted by scalvert:

Originally posted by Strikeslip:

Captain Kirk says, "Obey the Prime Directive."

All of the New World would still be "un-contacted tribes" if we actually did that.

Yeah, but the Star Trek series didn't start until the mid 1960's. :-P
05/30/2008 10:42:02 AM · #7
What we could do, is set up an invisible observation bunker to study them. We could also send in an android to infiltrate their tribe, and become a tribe member. That would be totally awesome.
05/30/2008 10:44:33 AM · #8
Originally posted by LoudDog:

My dilemma, do we treat these people like endangered animals and protect them? Or do we treat them like human beings and introduce them to the world?

It said on the news that they may be in danger. The illegal logging of the rain forest is getting closer and closer to this unkown tribe, so they may eventually need some sort of aid. However, living out their like that they may not need anyone's help, they can probably fend for themselves.
I just couldn't get over their different colours!
05/30/2008 10:47:01 AM · #9
Originally posted by LoudDog:

My dilemma, do we treat these people like endangered animals and protect them? Or do we treat them like human beings and introduce them to the world?


Given the small size of their population, introducing them to the rest of the world would quickly kill them off with some disease that most of the rest of the world is immune to.
05/30/2008 10:56:08 AM · #10
Originally posted by glad2badad:

Originally posted by LoudDog:

... Or are the photos a hoax and the BBC got punked?

I wondered the same thing.

If the photos are real, it's kind of interesting to note the style of dwellings that they've built.


This is a strange response, guys... According to the article, there are about 100 of these "uncontacted tribes" that have been located, most near the Peru/Brazil border. It's a known fact that tribes like this exist. Why assume a hoax?

And, out of curiosity, what's "noteworthy" about the style of dwellings? I'm not sure I catch your drift there.

R.
05/30/2008 11:12:06 AM · #11
Either hoax or no hoax would be a dangerous hasty assumption.

I saw a documentary about Pigmies once, which featured excerpts from an earlier documentary in which Pigmies were shown performing rituals around a shrine of some sort and constructing a rope bridge across a river. The point made in the newer documentary was that the earlier one demonstrated no more than the astute intelligence and learning abilities of the little nomads who, in fact, neither constructed shrines nor performed rituals when not instructed by camera teams (the closest they got to religion would have been a general worship of the forest in which they roamed and from which all sustenance and shelter was taken). In addition they never built bridges either, as they didn't have plans to take the same route twice.

If the tribes have indeed been located then I suspect it's only a matter of time before over-eager photographers drive the thin end of the wedge into them.
05/30/2008 11:15:07 AM · #12
Originally posted by Strikeslip:

Captain Kirk says, "Obey the Prime Directive."


Think of a plausible excuse to initiate violence on a weekly basis?
05/30/2008 11:17:01 AM · #13
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

... And, out of curiosity, what's "noteworthy" about the style of dwellings? I'm not sure I catch your drift there.

R.

If this tribe has not had any outside contact/influence I just found it interesting how the thatch roof dwellings with the sloped roof looked very much like similar designs seen elsewhere. I've seen photos of different parts of the world where those dwellings would blend right in. Similar designs were reconstructed in historical areas like Jamestown, VA that are supposed to be representative of early Indian settlements found here.

I don't know...I guess I just find it "interesting" (not in a bad way). :-)
05/30/2008 11:25:55 AM · #14
Originally posted by glad2badad:

If this tribe has not had any outside contact/influence I just found it interesting how the thatch roof dwellings with the sloped roof looked very much like similar designs seen elsewhere.

Given that the Ice Age people who migrated from Europe and/or Asia to populate the Americas also lived in thatched huts, it would be a lot more interesting to me if they lived in raised ranch houses with vinyl siding. ;-)
05/30/2008 11:31:37 AM · #15
Maybe sloped roofs with thatching are a simple way to keep rain off your head. I can only think of a few solutions to this problem using materials in the woods.
05/30/2008 11:33:02 AM · #16
Originally posted by scalvert:

Originally posted by glad2badad:

If this tribe has not had any outside contact/influence I just found it interesting how the thatch roof dwellings with the sloped roof looked very much like similar designs seen elsewhere.

Given that the Ice Age people who migrated from Europe and/or Asia to populate the Americas also lived in thatched huts, it would be a lot more interesting to me if they lived in raised ranch houses with vinyl siding. ;-)


Houses like that, anyway, are absolutely a universal indigenous architecture. They represent the simplest, most straightforward path to shelter in a forested area. It's not surprising that this approach might be independently arrived at by widely-separated peoples.

R.
05/30/2008 11:42:02 AM · #17
You have to wonder how the appearance of a helicopter with a few human heads hanging out the side is going to impact their culture.

05/30/2008 11:43:56 AM · #18
Originally posted by Bujanx:

You have to wonder how the appearance of a helicopter with a few human heads hanging out the side is going to impact their culture.

Something about the bows and arrows makes me think the visitors wouldn't be welcomed as gods...
05/30/2008 11:47:37 AM · #19
I think if you got up close, and started taking off all the paint, you'd find like Jim Morrison, Elvis, etc. and, the tribe chief is Jimmy Hoffa! :-P
05/30/2008 11:49:18 AM · #20
Originally posted by taterbug:

I think if you got up close, and started taking off all the paint, you'd find like Jim Morrison, Elvis, etc. and, the tribe chief is Jimmy Hoffa! :-P


I didn't see anyone fat enough to be Elvis, the others I could believe.
05/30/2008 11:50:36 AM · #21
I think it's amazing how we are still discovering people out there who have no idea what's out there in the rest of the world (at least that's what I'm lead to believe?). As far as these people go, I'd say that they need to be left alone. Introducing them to the hundreds of diseases and illnesses that seem routine and common to most people around the world today would be devastating to them. Not to mention the severe culture shock of going from a small tribe in the middle of the jungle to a city with millions of people. And as far as thatched roofs go...how did the rest of the world get them? It has to develop at some point in time and given enough time and resources, I'm sure these people could learn to develop and make all the things we use today. I agree though, obey the prime directive and wait until they have warp capability before making first contact.

Message edited by author 2008-05-30 11:51:18.
05/30/2008 11:50:42 AM · #22
I think there is a chance it's a hoax, partially because setting something like this up would be great ammo for someone to use stop the logging, and partially because it would be funny to get a news agency to publish photos of naked people shooting bow/arrows at a camera.

I don't doubt the existance of these tribes.
05/30/2008 12:07:24 PM · #23
We could make them perform in bizarre contests of their athletic and mental abilities, day after day, with video cameras following them every moment of the day and night. The losers would then have to go to tribal council and vote off one of their buddies. The person voted off must then go join civilization.


05/30/2008 12:07:26 PM · #24
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by glad2badad:

If this tribe has not had any outside contact/influence I just found it interesting how the thatch roof dwellings with the sloped roof looked very much like similar designs seen elsewhere.

Houses like that, anyway, are absolutely a universal indigenous architecture. They represent the simplest, most straightforward path to shelter in a forested area. It's not surprising that this approach might be independently arrived at by widely-separated peoples.

R.

Emphasis in above quote added by me...

That's what I was trying to get at (partially) - the "independently arrived at by widely-separated peoples" part. Perhaps "interesting" was the wrong word...to put it another way, I just think it's fascinating. :-)
05/30/2008 01:32:59 PM · #25
Originally posted by glad2badad:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by glad2badad:

If this tribe has not had any outside contact/influence I just found it interesting how the thatch roof dwellings with the sloped roof looked very much like similar designs seen elsewhere.

Houses like that, anyway, are absolutely a universal indigenous architecture. They represent the simplest, most straightforward path to shelter in a forested area. It's not surprising that this approach might be independently arrived at by widely-separated peoples.

R.

Emphasis in above quote added by me...

That's what I was trying to get at (partially) - the "independently arrived at by widely-separated peoples" part. Perhaps "interesting" was the wrong word...to put it another way, I just think it's fascinating. :-)


Alright, there ya go :-) I agree. Cross-cultural similarities are extremely fascinating, wherever they occur. Particularly fascinating are the incredible similarities between widely-separated creation myths, for example.

R.
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