DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> Whats The Best
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 24 of 24, (reverse)
AuthorThread
05/21/2008 12:52:20 PM · #1
I'd be grateful for your opinions on which one is better

Nikon D300 or the Canon E0S 5D

Thank
John
05/21/2008 01:22:14 PM · #2
Hehe, you are just trying to start trouble. Sadly I cannot give you an answer and only say I love my D300 however 5D owners love their 5Ds too. I am anti-Canon, but others are Anti-Nikon. :)

Good luck jarjar!
05/21/2008 01:55:41 PM · #3
Hi
I use to ue the works D2xs, however I have changed jobs and have to buy my own now..I have alway used Nikon but I'm not sure whether a change is needed, but you hear and see that picture are sharper with canon, I realise that it not all down to the camera and the user is to blame most of the time...just wanted some views.Why do you like the D300 so much
05/21/2008 02:19:58 PM · #4
<- ISO 1600, no noise reduction.
[thumb]680791[/thumb]
05/21/2008 02:23:06 PM · #5
I have the Canon 5D and I have been very pleased with it since day one. I don't think you would go wrong if you bought either camera. Or buy both and let us know the real answer behind the question. :o)

Message edited by author 2008-05-21 18:04:20.
05/21/2008 02:28:13 PM · #6
Can you go somewhere and hold them both in your hands?
05/21/2008 02:55:58 PM · #7
I own a D300 and I've played with 5Ds, and my god, the 5D is awful in your hands, IMO. Nikon has such a mastery of ergonomics, I believe.

I firmly believe, though, that either camera is going to be only as good as the user. I wouldn't really say either one is going to take better images, especially when shot "right."
05/21/2008 02:58:50 PM · #8
That is at least partly true, I haven't held a 5D but OMG the D300 fits my hand so well, I feel so in control of it even single handed.

Originally posted by Anti-Martyr:

I own a D300 and I've played with 5Ds, and my god, the 5D is awful in your hands, IMO. Nikon has such a mastery of ergonomics, I believe.

I firmly believe, though, that either camera is going to be only as good as the user. I wouldn't really say either one is going to take better images, especially when shot "right."
05/21/2008 02:59:17 PM · #9
Unless you need full frame, the Nikon D300 is currently a better camera by virtue of its newer technologies. The 5D is nearly three years old (ancient by digital camera standards), but supposedly due to be replaced next month.
05/21/2008 04:11:04 PM · #10
D300, easy.
05/21/2008 05:05:12 PM · #11
oh boy.
this could get ugly!

CANON!
*runs and hides*
05/21/2008 05:41:00 PM · #12
what have i started, but thank for all your thoughts
05/21/2008 06:08:07 PM · #13
Originally posted by scalvert:

Unless you need full frame, the Nikon D300 is currently a better camera by virtue of its newer technologies. The 5D is nearly three years old (ancient by digital camera standards), but supposedly due to be replaced next month.


thats what they said last month...
05/21/2008 07:13:05 PM · #14
Speaking as a 25 year canon user, I'd say that the D300 has the edge up right now. It's got newer technology. BUT.... Canon is clearly the brand to buy (ducks) in the long run, just not the long-in-the-tooth 5D. Wait for the 5D replacement in a month or three. You should also think about how much you're going to be willing to spend on lenses. You need high quality glass to get the most out of a relatively large investment in camera body. It's not by accident that when you watch sporting events on TV, most cameras you see are sporting Canon "L" lenses (in white/gray) (poking fork at Nikon owners).

My $.02
05/22/2008 07:46:25 AM · #15
Originally posted by chrisab:

Speaking as a 25 year canon user, I'd say that the D300 has the edge up right now. It's got newer technology. BUT.... Canon is clearly the brand to buy (ducks) in the long run, just not the long-in-the-tooth 5D. Wait for the 5D replacement in a month or three. You should also think about how much you're going to be willing to spend on lenses. You need high quality glass to get the most out of a relatively large investment in camera body. It's not by accident that when you watch sporting events on TV, most cameras you see are sporting Canon "L" lenses (in white/gray) (poking fork at Nikon owners).

My $.02


It's because Canon users want people to notice the size of their appendage. When you have the girth of a Nikon, you don't need to highlight it.

; )
05/22/2008 07:50:40 AM · #16
the true test of the better camera is when it can stand up to the test of having entire glasses of wine spilled on it, on more than one occasion, and it still keeps rockin
05/22/2008 08:14:34 AM · #17
Pick one, the gear does not make you a photographer.

Your forethought, attention to detail, imagination, and execution will.

Nikon or Canon or some other brand has no bearing on your ability.
05/22/2008 08:28:29 AM · #18
Sighs, that argument annoys me so much. Of course a great camera will not make you a great photographer, however a bad camera will limit a photographers greatness. Great photography even with great talent is in many cases a matter of luck more than planning.

A great camera will give you better odds, be it for being durable, weather resistant, focusing lightning fast, or firing off shots faster than you can move your finger, all these things help to capture with your camera what you see in your heart. *lays it on real thick* hehehe

I think the biggest difference no one has mentioned yet, the 5D is a full-frame sensor. This means less noise, and probably better low light performance. The 5D will give true focal ranges, meaning your 200mm lens will be a 200mm lens. Your 10mm will be 10mm. Great for landscapes.

The D300 being a cropped sensor will give 50% greater reach, your 200mm becomes a 300mm. However the 10mm becomes a 15mm, 18 becomes 27, and so on. So it is great for telephoto but not great for landscapes. The D300 has slightly more noise but a lot less noise than the D200 did.

The D300 is ideal for sports and wildlife because of these strengths, while the 5D is ideal as a paper-weight, err, I mean for taking breathtaking landscapes that seem to go on forever.

I just know that if the Nikon D3 was the same price I would probably still pick the D300, then again I like long telephoto shots more than landscapes.
05/22/2008 09:24:27 AM · #19
Originally posted by grigrigirl:

the true test of the better camera is when it can stand up to the test of having entire glasses of wine spilled on it, on more than one occasion, and it still keeps rockin


You're supposed to put your drink down when you shoot, at least when you turn it portrait oriented. ...or, get a flask like this. ;-)

263502_camera_flask.jpg
05/22/2008 09:29:57 AM · #20
Originally posted by Telehubbie:

Originally posted by grigrigirl:

the true test of the better camera is when it can stand up to the test of having entire glasses of wine spilled on it, on more than one occasion, and it still keeps rockin


You're supposed to put your drink down when you shoot, at least when you turn it portrait oriented. ...or, get a flask like this. ;-)

263502_camera_flask.jpg


Owch, that's a major wannahave!
05/22/2008 06:18:32 PM · #21
Originally posted by togtog:

Sighs, that argument annoys me so much. Of course a great camera will not make you a great photographer, however a bad camera will limit a photographers greatness. Great photography even with great talent is in many cases a matter of luck more than planning.


Great...unless you are studio/stage anchored and have total control. Then luck has nothing to do with it.

Originally posted by togtog:



A great camera will give you better odds, be it for being durable, weather resistant, focusing lightning fast, or firing off shots faster than you can move your finger, all these things help to capture with your camera what you see in your heart. *lays it on real thick* hehehe


A GREAT camera to me would have cup holders.

A BAD camera to me is guilty of drive by shootings.

Your definition of great and bad has little meaning, but your comparison and contrast of the 5D and the D300 are accurate.


05/22/2008 06:43:55 PM · #22
Both are excellent cameras that will serve just about anyone extremely well. Both do some things better than the other, and I'd be pretty stoked to own either.

05/22/2008 07:20:43 PM · #23
flip a coin. What's the most you ever lost on a coin toss?
05/23/2008 05:04:03 AM · #24
Originally posted by Man_Called_Horse:

Originally posted by togtog:

Sighs, that argument annoys me so much. Of course a great camera will not make you a great photographer, however a bad camera will limit a photographers greatness. Great photography even with great talent is in many cases a matter of luck more than planning.


Great...unless you are studio/stage anchored and have total control. Then luck has nothing to do with it.


Ah yes true, I should try to be more specific in the future when countering arguments like your initial one. :) It is very true you can make up for a bad camera by locking it in one spot and adjusting the lighting until perfect, having a beautiful model does not hurt either ;)

Originally posted by Man_Called_Horse:

Originally posted by togtog:

A great camera will give you better odds, be it for being durable, weather resistant, focusing lightning fast, or firing off shots faster than you can move your finger, all these things help to capture with your camera what you see in your heart. *lays it on real thick* hehehe


A GREAT camera to me would have cup holders.

A BAD camera to me is guilty of drive by shootings.

Your definition of great and bad has little meaning, but your comparison and contrast of the 5D and the D300 are accurate.


Bah, you know that idea is just silly. First cup holders, next soda soaked cameras. There is a reason they don't have cup holders. Don't get me started on the risk of beer... mehuehehugh.

Seriously though I believe a persons work to only be as good as their tools, that includes hardware, environment, and their brain. I believe it to be inaccurate to disregard one as unimportant counting on the others to make up for it. It is the entire system which is important.

I understand the desire to direct new photographers towards honing their brains and eyes, rather than letting them assume better hardware will result in better results, however to state that the hardware as being completely unimportant to the task to be misleading.

Also, a good camera can actually be good for a bad photographer as long as they understand the above, since they cannot as easily blame their hardware for their results. Like I said, my photos haven't really improved since I got my D300, then again I did not expect them to. I just expected the camera to do what it was told and give a predictable result.

However when I had my G2 I would blame the camera, because often it did limit me, by its aperture range, lack of ultra-wide or telephoto without clumsy adapters, poor manual focus, slow and often inaccurate auto focus. It was very easy to blame the camera.

Now I can't, when a shot doesn't turn out instead of blaming the camera I start asking myself why the picture didn't turn out and what I should have looked for and done before taking it, and after. So in a way, this great camera has improved my photography already.

Also a camera with bells and whistles makes photography more fun. There are times when I don't want to bother setting up a shot, I just want to take some pictures, it makes that easy, but it also makes it easy if I want absolute control. When photography is more fun, people are more likely to pay attention to advice IMHO.

Don't even get me started on things like being able to fine tune white balances to remove or add tinting, 51 auto-focus points, and intelligent auto-focus tracking that keeps the subject in focus while moving around. :)

OK OK end rant, sorry mate. But seriously, the cup holders is just asking for trouble.
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 12/19/2018 06:11:08 AM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2018 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 12/19/2018 06:11:08 AM EST.