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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> Colour Space/Profile in CS3
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04/13/2008 10:40:17 AM · #1
I currently work in sRGB (in PS this shows as IEC61966-2.1), is this the same as Adobe RGB (1998), as this seems to show up when it's converted to a jpeg, and in the ICC Profile in the file properties?

Also if I am sending an image for printing and for online usage, should I leave it in the above profile and just make sure they know to choose that for the printer, or should I do two differnt ones for online/monitor and for printing?

thanks in advance...
04/13/2008 11:06:51 AM · #2
sRGB adobe RGB are not the same.

you'd want to find out what profile the lab printing the image for you wants, and if it's not sRGB - create a version that is in the profile they use. otherwise what you see won't be what you get.

if you're printing at home - i usually disable the printers profiling, and tell the print dialog to let the printer allow PS to manage colors.

it's possoble you're shooting in sRGB, but have PS set to automatically convert files to the working color space - in this case you 'd have PS's working space set at Adobe RGB. edit>color settings will get you into the color management area of PS.


Message edited by author 2008-04-13 11:09:42.
04/13/2008 11:41:01 AM · #3
Hmm, I don't understand..

In edit>color settings it's set to sRGB IEC61966-2.1

But in the advanced part of the file info it says Adobe Photoshop Properties>ICC Profile>Adobe RGB (1998)?

And in this thread:
//www.dpchallenge.com/forum.php?action=read&FORUM_THREAD_ID=753811

I posted a picture and geoffb said, "The image is in Adobe RGB (1998) colour space. Are you sending it to the printer like this? If so, can your printer handle it? Trying switching to sRGB or your printer's profile (if you have it)."

which worked OK..?

So should I be working in sRGB or Adobe RGB (1998)?
04/13/2008 12:13:31 PM · #4
i'm not sure i can specifically answer you're question. but adobe RGB is a wider color space. holds more color values than sRGB. so if you send an Adobe RGB image to a printer that prints in sRGB - the colors are going to get squished into the sRGB space ( without any control from you ). if you edit the Adobe RGB image yourself to your liking as sRGB image - what prints should be perfect rather than OK. if that makes sense.

i typically don't trust the file info that PS spits out. just consider the files byte size ( it's never right ). except in the save as for web dialog. at least as far as i can tell.

if in edit>color settings you're working space is sRGB - and you are shooting in sRGB - you should be fine.

if you're working space is sRGB and you're shooting in Adobe RGB and automatically converting to the working space when you open the image - you're sort of ok ( though you might get color shifts from the conversion).

if you're working space is sRGB and you are shooting in Adobe RGB and using the embedded color profile when opening the image and then proofing the image for sRGB ( while you edit ) - then converting to sRGB for your print file - you should be golden.


04/13/2008 12:18:47 PM · #5
i work with RAW files - shot in Adobe RGB ( the widest space my camera allows ), then export the RAW>TIFF in the widest color space i can as a 16bit file. ( pro photoRGB exported from light room as 16bit). then proof and convert to different color spaces for a given output. ( web, print, master copy etc. ).

sRGB fits inside Adobe RGB > Adobe RGB fits inside ProPhoto RGB. so i am not losing/squishing an color data until i save the file for it's given use. with the master copy staying in ProPhoto RGB.

Message edited by author 2008-04-13 12:22:25.
04/13/2008 12:27:46 PM · #6
Listen to the beginning of this radiant vista thing
04/13/2008 01:21:27 PM · #7
Can I use this thread to ask something I was wondering about? For al ong time I have been using a non calibrated screen and photos sent to my local lab resulted in very unpredictable results, as did trying to print at home.
I recently got a spyder 2 xpress monitor and used i t to ccalibrate my screen. I then save an ICC profile.
When using Photoshop now, should I convert all images to the spyder profile when they ar loaded into PS?
How should I use this new screen profile to make sure that waht I SEE is what I GET?

thx
M.
04/13/2008 04:01:20 PM · #8
I'm shooting in sRGB (Nikon D40) for some reason, being a newbie I was using the info on here:

//www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d40/users-guide/menus-shooting.htm#colormode

should I change to Color Mode II Adobe RGB?

I know some people hate KR but is this true?

//www.kenrockwell.com/tech/adobe-rgb.htm
04/13/2008 04:06:57 PM · #9
no - the spyder profile is just so you can be sure the monitor is seeing the math behind the colors correctly. black is black, white is white, and everything in between.

Originally posted by Refwhett:

Can I use this thread to ask something I was wondering about? For al ong time I have been using a non calibrated screen and photos sent to my local lab resulted in very unpredictable results, as did trying to print at home.
I recently got a spyder 2 xpress monitor and used i t to ccalibrate my screen. I then save an ICC profile.
When using Photoshop now, should I convert all images to the spyder profile when they ar loaded into PS?
How should I use this new screen profile to make sure that waht I SEE is what I GET?

thx
M.

04/13/2008 04:09:12 PM · #10
What is the correct color space for printing in a photo lab?
04/13/2008 04:09:36 PM · #11
like it says there - not unless you know what you are doing. and i'm still not clear on what your are doing, or where your issue lies.

Originally posted by rob_smith:

should I change to Color Mode II Adobe RGB?

04/13/2008 04:12:22 PM · #12
most likely sRGB, but you should check with the lab to be sure.

Originally posted by ssocrates:

What is the correct color space for printing in a photo lab?

04/13/2008 04:30:07 PM · #13
Originally posted by soup:

no - the spyder profile is just so you can be sure the monitor is seeing the math behind the colors correctly. black is black, white is white, and everything in between.

Originally posted by Refwhett:

Can I use this thread to ask something I was wondering about? For al ong time I have been using a non calibrated screen and photos sent to my local lab resulted in very unpredictable results, as did trying to print at home.
I recently got a spyder 2 xpress monitor and used i t to ccalibrate my screen. I then save an ICC profile.
When using Photoshop now, should I convert all images to the spyder profile when they ar loaded into PS?
How should I use this new screen profile to make sure that waht I SEE is what I GET?

thx
M.


Thank you soup
M.
04/13/2008 04:44:13 PM · #14
Originally posted by soup:

like it says there - not unless you know what you are doing. and i'm still not clear on what your are doing, or where your issue lies.

Originally posted by rob_smith:

should I change to Color Mode II Adobe RGB?


Apologies Tim, but I have to ask the stupid questions to learn..

So, it seems everything is OK:

1. I am shooting in Color Mode III on the D40 which is sRGB.
2. I have PS CS3 set to sRGB in the colour settings.
3. Everything is being output in sRGB which seems compatible with most things. And my printer is also set to this profile.

The only thing that was confusing me was this bit, "in the advanced part of the file info it says Adobe Photoshop Properties>ICC Profile>Adobe RGB (1998)?" but maybe that's just the way PS displays the information... I dunno.
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