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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Super Wide Zoom
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04/04/2008 11:49:52 PM · #1
So I've been wanting to add a super wide zoom to by bag for a while.

I'm currently looking at the Tokina Zoom Super Wide Angle AF 12-24mm f/4 AT-X 124AF Pro

I want to start shooting landscapes and that is mainly what I'll be using it for, but I also need something for large group shots in tight places. It will be supplementing my 24-70 and 70-200.

Any feedback on this lens? Any issues with barrel distortion? Sharpness? Focus Speed? I read the reviews at B&H and they were all glowing, but I thought I would query this group as well.

04/05/2008 12:40:59 AM · #2
The tok is a superb lens. I now own both the Canon 10-22 and the Tok and I think it's a toss up. The Canon is a bit wider, but the Tok is built like a tank. Any superwide like this is going to give distortions, but it's such a cool focal length, there's so much you can do with it. Essential!
04/05/2008 12:47:36 AM · #3
I have the Sigma 12-24 and it's a great lens. Pretty low on the distortion and the only lens in this range that will work w full frame.
04/05/2008 01:00:04 AM · #4
It has been said that the only thing keeping the Canon 10-22 from being considered an "L" lens is the fact that it is made specifically for cropped sensors. Thus, the EF-S moniker. Folks have said that the glass is the same as "L" glass. I don't know the technical aspects of these comparisons, but I do know it takes very sharp photos.

Check out my photos shot with that lens.
04/05/2008 01:18:40 AM · #5
I use this lens every day for my work and love it. It's very sharp and sturdy. Barrel distortion is minimal, but you *will* get converging verticals when shooting at it's widest (12mm)...an easy fix in PS.
04/05/2008 01:27:42 AM · #6
I have the lens you are referring to (Nikon mount). I love it. Actually my highest scoring shot on DPC is taken with it. :)

There can be some vignetting at the 12 mm end, but I think that's mostly true for all super wide angle lenses.
04/05/2008 01:41:29 AM · #7
I'm not sure how happy you are going to be with group portraits on a super wide. The people on the edges aren't going to be too thrilled with you...
04/05/2008 02:00:23 AM · #8
Originally posted by amandak:

I use this lens every day for my work and love it. It's very sharp and sturdy. Barrel distortion is minimal, but you *will* get converging verticals when shooting at it's widest (12mm)...an easy fix in PS.


Just to elaborate on this, "converging verticals" is NOT a function of something specific to the Tokina, just a fact of life. And anyway, all other things being equal converging verticals is LESS of a problem at 10-12mm than, say, at 17mm or 24mm. Why? Because you get convergence when you point the camera UP to include all of a building, and if the lens is wide enough you don't have to DO that to cover the building: you just end up with extra foreground you may want to crop out.

Hint: When you have coverage issues, use the lens at 10-12mm in VERTICAL orientation, place the building at the top of the frame, and then crop to square or horizontal later; it's effectively a "shift lens" when used this way, at the expense (of course) of some sensor area.

R.
04/05/2008 10:15:05 AM · #9
Originally posted by Bear_Music:


Hint: When you have coverage issues, use the lens at 10-12mm in VERTICAL orientation, place the building at the top of the frame, and then crop to square or horizontal later; it's effectively a "shift lens" when used this way, at the expense (of course) of some sensor area.


Great point!

And easy to forget about: to my brain at least, the term wide angle subconsciously suggests wide format.
04/05/2008 10:22:22 AM · #10
Originally posted by riolobo:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:


Hint: When you have coverage issues, use the lens at 10-12mm in VERTICAL orientation, place the building at the top of the frame, and then crop to square or horizontal later; it's effectively a "shift lens" when used this way, at the expense (of course) of some sensor area.


Great point!

And easy to forget about: to my brain at least, the term wide angle subconsciously suggests wide format.


Right. But ultra-wide can be extraordinarily effective in vertical orientation in the landscape. The foreground shells in this image are about an inch in diameter:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/596/120/439846.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/596/120/439846.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

There's nothing quite like ultra-wide for placing intimate, natural details in their much wider context.

R.
04/05/2008 12:48:31 PM · #11
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Hint: When you have coverage issues, use the lens at 10-12mm in VERTICAL orientation, place the building at the top of the frame, and then crop to square or horizontal later; it's effectively a "shift lens" when used this way, at the expense (of course) of some sensor area.

Or use a lot of black space at the bottom of the said vertical composition. LOL! Like I did here (taken at 14mm):

' . substr('//farm3.static.flickr.com/2308/2258137169_377102fa5a_m.jpg', strrpos('//farm3.static.flickr.com/2308/2258137169_377102fa5a_m.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
04/05/2008 02:34:46 PM · #12
Wow, thank for all the quality feedback.
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