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03/29/2008 11:49:19 PM · #1
Hi all,

We are currently using Adonbe Photoshop Elements for most of our editing. One question, is there a good software package that lets you easily crop pictures so they are the correct size for 8x10 and such? Some sort of outlined box perhaps that you move around the screen?

I don't know the best way to crop photos without lossing DPI.

Suggestions would be gretly appreciated.

03/30/2008 12:08:04 AM · #2
I'm not sure of other programs, but Photoshop CS3 (and CS2) allow cropping to specific sizes and ratios, such as 8 x 10, 5 x 7, 4 x 6, etc. The bounding box becomes the size that you've selected and you can move it around the photo until you like the composition.


03/30/2008 12:09:00 AM · #3
Originally posted by AperturePriority:

I'm not sure of other programs, but Photoshop CS3 (and CS2) allow cropping to specific sizes and ratios, such as 8 x 10, 5 x 7, 4 x 6, etc. The bounding box becomes the size that you've selected and you can move it around the photo until you like the composition.


Elements allows it as well
03/30/2008 12:12:14 AM · #4
Not sure what your budget is but I use Adobe Lightroom and you can do just that. Plus it freakin RAWKS for post production!

Adobe's Website
It's 300 bucks, but there is a 30 free trial that you can download from the link above.
03/30/2008 12:12:35 AM · #5
PaintShop Pro also has preset aspect ratios and allows me to create additional presets.

Message edited by author 2008-03-30 00:13:01.
03/30/2008 12:17:15 AM · #6
For Windows users, there is a free program to do general photo edits (including specific size cropping) and to organize your photos, download Windows Live Photo Gallery.

This works with Windows XP SP2 or Windows Vista (32- or 64-bit).

From the download page...

"Windows Live Photo Gallery makes it easy to organize, share and edit your photographs. Upload creative photo slideshows to your Windows Live Space with just a few clicks. Download entire albums from Windows Live Spaces at high resolution. Create a cool panoramic view by combining multiple photos. Enhance your photos by adjusting things like color and exposure. Improve them with simple crop and red-eye fixes."


03/30/2008 12:23:21 AM · #7
Here is what I have learned from Printroom to keep the pixels in a correct aspect ratio without losing pixels, but keep in mind this is being done with Photoshop CS2 and I'm not sure how much of this can be done in previous versions of Photoshop and/or Photoshop Elements:

Across the tool bar, click view, select show rulers, and guides.
Go to the crop tool, and use any of the presets there or type in your own numbers, such as 8in and 10in and set at 300dpi. Then using the crop tool, drag your crop as you wish to crop the image. Now go and click on the ruler and drag a guide to each of the 4 sides where the selection has the "marching ants". They will snap to the crop dimensions. Now go and click on the crop tool again and when asked if you want to crop the selection, choose no, then go up to the tool bar where you typed in the dimensions earlier and drag over the dimensions there and hit backspace to remove the numbers. You should have the crop selection tool still selected, just no dimensions stated in the tool bar. Now using the crop tool, go to one or the 4 intersections where the guides cross and click and drag to the opposite corner. Again the tool will snap to the guides when real close. Once selected and you see the marching ants on all 4 of the guides, double-click anywhere inside the selection and you now have the 8x10 aspect ratio crop with no resizing of any of the pixels. You can easily double-check your work at this point by acting like you are going to resize the image and look at the dimensions.
One thing that makes this a desirable way to crop an image, is that should you choose to crop in a different aspect ratio from that crop, you have all the original pixels to do so with, not pixels that have been affected by resampling methods used in resizing.

I can do some printscreens on this method if needed to show a step-by-step, or could do up a tutorial if needed.
03/30/2008 01:19:25 AM · #8
Originally posted by Brad:

Here is what I have learned from Printroom to keep the pixels in a correct aspect ratio without losing pixels, but keep in mind this is being done with Photoshop CS2 and I'm not sure how much of this can be done in previous versions of Photoshop and/or Photoshop Elements:

Across the tool bar, click view, select show rulers, and guides.
Go to the crop tool, and use any of the presets there or type in your own numbers, such as 8in and 10in and set at 300dpi. Then using the crop tool, drag your crop as you wish to crop the image. Now go and click on the ruler and drag a guide to each of the 4 sides where the selection has the "marching ants". They will snap to the crop dimensions. Now go and click on the crop tool again and when asked if you want to crop the selection, choose no, then go up to the tool bar where you typed in the dimensions earlier and drag over the dimensions there and hit backspace to remove the numbers. You should have the crop selection tool still selected, just no dimensions stated in the tool bar. Now using the crop tool, go to one or the 4 intersections where the guides cross and click and drag to the opposite corner. Again the tool will snap to the guides when real close. Once selected and you see the marching ants on all 4 of the guides, double-click anywhere inside the selection and you now have the 8x10 aspect ratio crop with no resizing of any of the pixels. You can easily double-check your work at this point by acting like you are going to resize the image and look at the dimensions.
One thing that makes this a desirable way to crop an image, is that should you choose to crop in a different aspect ratio from that crop, you have all the original pixels to do so with, not pixels that have been affected by resampling methods used in resizing.

I can do some printscreens on this method if needed to show a step-by-step, or could do up a tutorial if needed.

' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' Brad a tutorial would be great. Sounds interesting and valuable.
Thanks.
03/30/2008 02:06:47 AM · #9
If you want something free, you might try Picasa... I took a basic photo class and the instructor showed this program because several of the students were using it. It had the box you could move around on your image. Just don't let Picasa take over filing and storing your photos.

Another thing you might look at is your printer software... I have a Canon and the software for that allows me to do the same thing.
03/30/2008 12:43:11 PM · #10
Thanks for the insights everyone.

Brad, I have used your method and it works. I put CS 8.0 on and my wife tried in Elements. A tutorial walk through could be very useful for newbies like us.

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