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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Lightroom and RAW import
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03/25/2008 08:35:49 AM · #1
Anybody has an answer on the following problem?

Importing a RAW image into Lightroom with adjusted camera setting (more saturation, more sharpness etc etc), but as soon as it shows up in Lightroom the entire pictures is looking blaaaah and flat so the adjustments in the camera didn't do jack and need to be adjusted again in lightroom.

any idea how to fix it?

thank you very much for every idea you guys can provide
03/25/2008 09:15:03 AM · #2
Assuming it is the same for Canon as it is for Nikon, there are only two ways to have all of the in-camera processing settings apply.

1. Use the camera maker's RAW processing software.

2. Shoot JPEG.

I always shoot RAW+JPEG, so I can use the JPEG in a hurry and then take my time with the RAW. I don't like Nikon's RAW software.
03/25/2008 10:11:18 AM · #3
As already mentioned, Lightroom doesn't know your camera settings. What I do is create a Preset that comes close to what I want to see (the contrast, saturation, etc). Then I apply that Preset as part of the import process. Having the Preset applied during the import process means that I pretty much only have to 'tweak' images after they are imported.

03/25/2008 10:18:06 AM · #4
Lightroom also has a setting that auto adjusts photos. if this is turned on it will override whatever the picture setting were and give it's own. you cna turn this off (don't aske me how at the moment I'm at work so no lightroom)
03/25/2008 01:46:10 PM · #5
[quote=dwterry]As already mentioned, Lightroom doesn't know your camera settings. What I do is create a Preset that comes close to what I want to see (the contrast, saturation, etc). Then I apply that Preset as part of the import process. Having the Preset applied during the import process means that I pretty much only have to 'tweak' images after they are imported.[quote]

thanks dwterry,
the only thing is, i don't know if you experience it that as soon as you click on the preview and it comes up on the "big" screen as one picture the saturation and setting are changing. It just takes a second or two to change, before the change the picture looks just like it came out of the camera.

Message edited by author 2008-03-25 13:48:00.
03/25/2008 02:38:53 PM · #6
There is an imbedded JPEG in each RAW file (though not a large one). The initial thumbnail being displayed is a preview using this imbedded JPEG. Once you look at the image the actual RAW file is loaded and displayed. The switch from the preview JPEG to the actual RAW file is the source of the loss of saturation, etc. that you are seeing.

Message edited by author 2008-03-25 16:48:27.
03/27/2008 11:15:08 AM · #7
Originally posted by krafty1:

There is an imbedded JPEG in each RAW file (though not a large one). The initial thumbnail being displayed is a preview using this imbedded JPEG. Once you look at the image the actual RAW file is loaded and displayed. The switch from the preview JPEG to the actual RAW file is the source of the loss of saturation, etc. that you are seeing.


... and there is no way to see the JPEG setting in the raw file, correct?
would be too nice :-)
03/27/2008 11:47:47 AM · #8
Originally posted by desurf:

Originally posted by krafty1:

There is an imbedded JPEG in each RAW file (though not a large one). The initial thumbnail being displayed is a preview using this imbedded JPEG. Once you look at the image the actual RAW file is loaded and displayed. The switch from the preview JPEG to the actual RAW file is the source of the loss of saturation, etc. that you are seeing.


... and there is no way to see the JPEG setting in the raw file, correct?
would be too nice :-)


In Lightroom you can set a parameter to import the RAW and jpeg as separate files. I don't know if the incamera settings show for the jpeg as I don't use this option.

Message edited by author 2008-03-27 11:50:28.
03/29/2008 12:21:07 AM · #9
I think ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' dwterry has the right idea in creating a Preset. Take a good RAW+JPEG shot and compare the two versions of the photo, manipulating/tweaking the settings of the RAW file to closely match that of the cooked (in-camera-processed) JPEG. Once created, you can apply the preset to your RAW files during import.

Also, if anyone is interested in a simple way to extract the imbedded jpeg from your RAW files, you can use this program from Michael Tapes' website RawWorkFlow.com. It's a tiny and simple program. It's especially good if you shoot RAW but need a quick way to send photo's to relatives after family events and the highest quality isn't necessarily required. Run the program and email the JPEGs. It's quite handy.

Message edited by author 2008-03-29 10:09:22.
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