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DPChallenge Forums >> Individual Photograph Discussion >> Don't worry, I wont cry or get mad...
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01/07/2008 09:38:35 AM · #1
If you give me a hard crtique of these images. This is a seniors set I did recently comments very welcome!

[thumb]629758[/thumb] [thumb]629759[/thumb] [thumb]629760[/thumb] [thumb]629761[/thumb] [thumb]629762[/thumb]
[thumb]629763[/thumb] [thumb]629765[/thumb] [thumb]629766[/thumb] [thumb]629767[/thumb]
[thumb]629768[/thumb] [thumb]629769[/thumb] [thumb]629770[/thumb]
01/07/2008 09:48:24 AM · #2
It might be my screen but the blacks seem really black and the lights are all washed. It seems that your curve is extremely harsh at extreme black (no detail on the black hat), and really "uncontrasty" anywhere else on there. That is my first impression.
01/07/2008 09:57:45 AM · #3
Thanks for the commetns so far... see I'm not crying yet... still looking for things I might change or do differently though.

Come on... I know there's someone out there that wants to really critique me (In a constructive way)
01/07/2008 09:59:32 AM · #4
They are nice. I like them all. Some of them could cleaned up bit more, and I think there is some focus issue, or my eyes getting blurry here... and could be a bit light (bright on the face) side :)
01/07/2008 10:15:31 AM · #5
Originally posted by FocusPoint:

They are nice. I like them all. Some of them could cleaned up bit more, and I think there is some focus issue, or my eyes getting blurry here... and could be a bit light (bright on the face) side :)


what would you have done differently?
01/07/2008 10:23:05 AM · #6
Hopefully this isn't too hard, but as FocusPoint said, focus issues. None of them are sharp, and at least one (folding chair) is badly out of focus. I've never worked with backdrops before, but in a few (e.g. #9) the wrinkles are distracting. I think your compositions are good, and you've brought out the warmth in the model, but I might have tried to catch her with a full, toothy smile, for variety's sake.

Message edited by author 2008-01-07 17:00:23.
01/07/2008 10:35:47 AM · #7
I agree that they all seem to be out of focus, some more than others. I think just a simple unsharp mask filter would improve them greatly. You got some good poses but the focus problems are what is keeping them from looking professional to me.
01/07/2008 10:37:04 AM · #8
Originally posted by citymars:

Hopefully this isn't too hard, but as FocusPoint said, focus issues. None of them are sharp, and at least one (folding chair) is badly out of focus. I've never worked with backdrops before, but in a few (e.g. #9) the wrinkles are distracting. I think your compositions are good, and you've brought out the warmth in the model, but for variety's sake I might have tried to catch her with a full, toothy smile, for variety's sake.


not too harsh at all. In my defence of the smile issue, she was not the 'big toothy grin' type of person... I had thought about it... and tried once or twice... they ended up looking a little fake
01/07/2008 10:38:45 AM · #9
Sent you PMs ;)
01/07/2008 10:46:33 AM · #10
My 2 cents:

First you need to pull the model farther away from the backdrop (at least 5 or 6 feet away) to get the bg to fall out of focus and be less dominant in the image.

Also, your images are very similar posing-wise. They look a bit stiff and formal. Senior portraits are usually much less formal and should show something of the person's personality. Don't be afraid to ask her to do something fun & goofy, like jumping or catch her laughing, etc.

Lighting is okay, not wrong, but a bit flat. Try moving your lights around between shots for more variety & drama.

Overall, its a nice start and with a little practice I think you'll get what you're after in no time. Have a look at this link for some ideas: //www.prestigeportraits.com/galleries/senior/


01/07/2008 10:53:26 AM · #11
Thanks! In regards to moving the model around. I've started a seperate thread about Working in small spaces I'm quite confined in the area I have to work in... any help there?
01/07/2008 11:35:42 AM · #12
Originally posted by Eyesup:

Thanks! In regards to moving the model around. I've started a seperate thread about Working in small spaces I'm quite confined in the area I have to work in... any help there?


Go outside :D
01/07/2008 11:55:34 AM · #13
Originally posted by inshaala:

It might be my screen but the blacks seem really black and the lights are all washed. It seems that your curve is extremely harsh at extreme black (no detail on the black hat), and really "uncontrasty" anywhere else on there. That is my first impression.


I think it is probably your screen...because they look like they could use a little extra contrast to me...ah damn monitors...
01/07/2008 11:59:12 AM · #14
Originally posted by lovethelight:

Originally posted by inshaala:

It might be my screen but the blacks seem really black and the lights are all washed. It seems that your curve is extremely harsh at extreme black (no detail on the black hat), and really "uncontrasty" anywhere else on there. That is my first impression.


I think it is probably your screen...because they look like they could use a little extra contrast to me...ah damn monitors...


Bah Monitors... Thanks for the comments! as a note these are basically right off the camera (did some lightroom ajustments, but that's it) havn't had a chance to sit with PS yet to continue the process... hopfully I can do that tonight with the whole set
01/07/2008 12:06:27 PM · #15
I dont know why but it appears to me that she is ducking her chin down and looking up at you with her eyes in a lot of the shots, as if you were shooting above eye level downwards, try a slightly lower vantage point. Also remember in portraiture, the wider the angle the bigger the closer object is than the ones behind (horses for example you can get a very cool looking shot by shooting the head looking face on where the muzzle is closer than the ears and it looks all distorted)even if they are in fact the same size. I never shoot a portrait at under 100mm if I can help it. If you have space issues and you cant get further away from the model I dont know what to suggest other than to take her outside into a more natural environment.

I havent shot this type of stuff for ages but hope it helps. Also experiment with your lighting set up and strength.
01/07/2008 12:07:27 PM · #16
I hope you don't mind but I did some basic editing on my favorite:
[thumb]630065[/thumb]

I did some basic levels and curves to darken and desaturated the background a bit because the color was a bit overpowering. I messed with the skin tones a bit because she looked a little magenta. I cloned out skin imperfections and some extra catchlights in her eyes and did some minor selective sharpening. Hope this helps

Claire
01/07/2008 12:08:19 PM · #17
Hey Michael.... this is 2008 ;)

Message edited by author 2008-01-07 12:08:44.
01/07/2008 12:10:54 PM · #18
Originally posted by loriprophoto:

I dont know why but it appears to me that she is ducking her chin down and looking up at you with her eyes in a lot of the shots, as if you were shooting above eye level downwards, try a slightly lower vantage point. Also remember in portraiture, the wider the angle the bigger the closer object is than the ones behind (horses for example you can get a very cool looking shot by shooting the head looking face on where the muzzle is closer than the ears and it looks all distorted)even if they are in fact the same size. I never shoot a portrait at under 100mm if I can help it. If you have space issues and you cant get further away from the model I dont know what to suggest other than to take her outside into a more natural environment.

I havent shot this type of stuff for ages but hope it helps. Also experiment with your lighting set up and strength.


Ya... I know the strenght of the lights is an issue especially in the space I have... thanks for the comment. I think most of these were taken at over 100mm for the most part...
01/07/2008 12:13:01 PM · #19
Originally posted by idnic:

Hey Michael.... this is 2008 ;)


I'm still living in denial...! I refuse to join you all in 2008 until atleast next month....lol
01/07/2008 12:15:19 PM · #20
Originally posted by Eyesup:



Ya... I know the strenght of the lights is an issue especially in the space I have... thanks for the comment. I think most of these were taken at over 100mm for the most part...


I'm no portrait photographer but couldn't you use a much shorter focal length/lens than 100mm and get your subject further away from the wall just to see what you come up with?

Message edited by author 2008-01-07 12:15:58.
01/07/2008 12:18:01 PM · #21
Another thing, hope I didnt miss it, but what settings were you shooting these on? The DOF issues may be a result of a larger f-stop (f4 or f5.6). It is a good idea to shoot at f8 or f11 sometimes higher if your lights are capable.
01/07/2008 12:31:25 PM · #22
Originally posted by loriprophoto:

Another thing, hope I didnt miss it, but what settings were you shooting these on? The DOF issues may be a result of a larger f-stop (f4 or f5.6). It is a good idea to shoot at f8 or f11 sometimes higher if your lights are capable.


The best is 2.8 :) well, for me at least :)
01/07/2008 01:25:45 PM · #23
Originally posted by FocusPoint:

Originally posted by loriprophoto:

Another thing, hope I didnt miss it, but what settings were you shooting these on? The DOF issues may be a result of a larger f-stop (f4 or f5.6). It is a good idea to shoot at f8 or f11 sometimes higher if your lights are capable.


The best is 2.8 :) well, for me at least :)


I was shooting between 2.8 and 4 for the most part
01/07/2008 01:30:51 PM · #24
I think you might need a new glass for sharper portraits.
01/07/2008 01:31:22 PM · #25
Originally posted by idnic:

My 2 cents:

First you need to pull the model farther away from the backdrop (at least 5 or 6 feet away) to get the bg to fall out of focus and be less dominant in the image.

Also, your images are very similar posing-wise. They look a bit stiff and formal. Senior portraits are usually much less formal and should show something of the person's personality. Don't be afraid to ask her to do something fun & goofy, like jumping or catch her laughing, etc.

Lighting is okay, not wrong, but a bit flat. Try moving your lights around between shots for more variety & drama.

Overall, its a nice start and with a little practice I think you'll get what you're after in no time. Have a look at this link for some ideas: //www.prestigeportraits.com/galleries/senior/


Overall I'd echo what Cindi has said and what others have said about focus. Also, the flat lighting doesn't help the focus issues at all.
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