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DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> PLEASE Calibrate your monitor before voting...
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02/15/2004 02:37:05 PM · #1
on the Black Challenge! In fact can this suggestion be put on the voting page???
02/15/2004 03:03:13 PM · #2
Since you opened this can of worms.. :) Can anyone offer simple intructions to find out if it's calibrated correctly and if it's not how to do it?

Tried looking it up in the forums but got back a whole bunch of unrelated things.

Thanks much!
02/15/2004 03:03:43 PM · #3
yes!! please do!!
I can hear it know this photo looks too dark...lol
02/15/2004 03:16:17 PM · #4
Originally posted by ellamay:

yes!! please do!!
I can hear it know this photo looks too dark...lol


you forgot to mention to avoid drinking any alchool before calibrating the monitor.
02/15/2004 03:21:16 PM · #5
How about calibrating before uploading your picture? If people complain you don't want it to be your own fault.
02/15/2004 03:50:08 PM · #6
I found this to be a great tutorial on monitor calibration. (I found his "gamma and black-level charts" -- about half-way down the page -- very interesting, and by stepping back to the point where you can no longer make out the lines in the charts, confirmed that my gamma is indeed centered around 2.2. I calibrate my CRT with an Eye-One Display.)

Message edited by author 2004-02-15 15:50:57.
02/15/2004 03:55:33 PM · #7
Hey, be calm. Everyone that works with digital photography knows how important is to be corrected calibrated. But... not all monitors are good enoght to be calibrated, some video board are too poor and some people don't have the proper software. I use Adobe Gamma, it's very easy, and come with Adobe Photoshop 7.0 or higher. There is a thread in foruns named Monitor Calibration //www.dpchallenge.com/forum.php?action=read&FORUM_THREAD_ID=42369 that explain all steps to proceed with Adobe Gamma.
But if you don't have it, why can you get real look from your image? Bellow every image in DPC votting pages are a bar with tones from light grey to black. Simply adjusting your monitor brightness to allow you to see each of these tones is suficient to vote very well.

Message edited by author 2004-02-15 15:58:33.
02/15/2004 03:59:00 PM · #8
If you are using PhotoShop Adobe Gamma works really well. If you are really colour conscious, you could look at purchasing Spyder.
02/15/2004 04:09:42 PM · #9
Give Me A Break!!!
02/15/2004 04:15:23 PM · #10
These links are all well and good but non work on a TFT monitor. Any links to help me would be very much appreciated.

Steve ak Jakeblu
02/15/2004 04:27:28 PM · #11
Originally posted by jakeblu:

These links are all well and good but non work on a TFT monitor. Any links to help me would be very much appreciated.

Steve ak Jakeblu

All methods used to calibrate CRT can be used to calibrate LCD or TFT (both are the same).
02/15/2004 05:11:20 PM · #12
I hope we can keep this thread open & alive thru-out the voting process as well.

I have a quick question for folks. I calibrated my montior & when I put my computer to sleep or on stand by, when I 'wake it up' or turn my settings back on, the calibration goes back to the original settings forcing me to reclaibrate it each time. Anyone else experience this? I am using XP as my OS.
02/15/2004 06:50:43 PM · #13
Originally posted by Rooster:

I hope we can keep this thread open & alive thru-out the voting process as well.

I have a quick question for folks. I calibrated my montior & when I put my computer to sleep or on stand by, when I 'wake it up' or turn my settings back on, the calibration goes back to the original settings forcing me to reclaibrate it each time. Anyone else experience this? I am using XP as my OS.


I believe that the trick is to calibrate and save the monitor profile for future loading. If you don't save the profile you'll go back to the default every time you reboot.
02/15/2004 09:46:38 PM · #14
I seem to be having a different type of problem. Most of my photos are soft out of the camera and I do some corrections in Photoshop Elements or M/S DI Pro9. I adjust the pictures in both and they look fine while editing them, but after saving they appear more saturated and darker than they did while editing. The image that goes to the printer is fine. I started having this issue after deinstalling a trial copy of CS8. Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated.
02/16/2004 11:41:43 AM · #15
Originally posted by ellamay:

yes!! please do!!
I can hear it know this photo looks too dark...lol


I say that often..I have checked and adjusted by monitor (correctly adjusted it got DARKER!) and have been to the eye doctor. Since no one says my pictures are too bright...it just might be TRUE that some pictures are too dark!

I refer folks with dark pics to //www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/expose-right.shtml and about 75% say Thank You and learned something.

the rest may not care or think i'm nuts (a commonly shared point of view BTW)or were going for some dark brooding moody pic and I failed to 'get' it.
02/16/2004 11:52:29 AM · #16
Originally posted by Rooster:

...I calibrated my montior & when I put my computer to sleep or on stand by, when I 'wake it up' or turn my settings back on, the calibration goes back to the original settings forcing me to reclaibrate it each time. Anyone else experience this? I am using XP as my OS.


You may already know, Rooster, that it takes quite a while for any monitor to warm up to its true calibrated state. The idea, of course, is to wait an equal period of time before making further adjustments and/or re-calibrating.
02/16/2004 12:35:39 PM · #17
Originally posted by bestagents:

I refer folks with dark pics to //www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/expose-right.shtml and about 75% say Thank You and learned something.

That article is not about exposing "to the right" in order to make dark pictures brighter. It's about getting more/better data from your images by shifting the exposure (and then adjusting back during post-processing). Furthermore, the advice is not applicable to non-linear output formats, such as jpeg; i.e. it's intended for capturing raw (linear) data.
02/16/2004 12:39:12 PM · #18
I guess everyone should also be allowed to submit (at least) two versions of their image: one for the standard PC gamma (2.2); and another for the standard mac gamma (roughly 1.8).
02/16/2004 01:00:52 PM · #19
Originally posted by dwoolridge:

I guess everyone should also be allowed to submit (at least) two versions of their image: one for the standard PC gamma (2.2); and another for the standard mac gamma (roughly 1.8).


I'm thinking, in praxis, why not assume a tolerance of 0.2 gamma and lighten/darken accordingly, if the image can stand it.
02/16/2004 01:09:31 PM · #20
Yes, big dilemma.
I have three or four comments on my "black" photo about crappy post processing and blurring in it that I cannot see at all. My monitor appears to be correctly calibrated (and I have a very good monitor) and I went through the process again this morning and I still cannot see any problems with the photo - but it's getting clobbered (which is not necessarily about this, naturally) and the comments are consistent.

Hmmm.
Catherine
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