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08/26/2007 11:30:56 PM · #26
It seems that when I add the 3 layers with the BW filter, I lose all color and it doesn't come back with my photo. Am I doing something wrong here (Obviously...)
08/26/2007 11:35:53 PM · #27
Originally posted by heavyj:

It seems that when I add the 3 layers with the BW filter, I lose all color and it doesn't come back with my photo. Am I doing something wrong here (Obviously...)


Yes....you need to use the blend layers...watch the next step for that info...you will see me change them to blend modes....experiment for your own preferred results.
08/26/2007 11:41:17 PM · #28
Originally posted by santiago-tan:

Hi Judi!

I'd really love to try out your work (as I have been wanting to learn this process) but my video stream here seems very very slow. So, I can't clearly understand your instructions (it's not your problem by the way).

In relation to this, I'd also like to know if there are text tutorials that brings about similar effect?

Also if you don't want to use Optikverve plugin (using Mac), are there other ways to achieve this?

Thanks so much!


If it is okay....please remind me of this in a few weeks time and I will get too and do up a text version to go with it. I have a couple of major jobs that I have to get out before I can allow myself to do that.

As for the Mac version I did find the text below from 'VirtualPhotographer' plugin adds film look to digital images for free

"The plugin runs only under Windows. optikVerve says a Mac version is under consideration. Rather than wait for a possible Macintosh version of the plugin, I installed it under Windows XP running on my dual-processor Mac through Virtual PC. This gave me the equivalent of a Macintosh version of virtualPhotographer, since image files can be dragged across from the virtualized PC's windowed desktop to the Mac's desktop and back again easily. (I reported on Virtual PC last week. See //aroundcny.com/technofile/texts/tec101004.html //aroundcny.com/technofile/texts/tec101004.html.)"
08/27/2007 12:49:42 AM · #29
Awesome tute Judi! The IR one is also very informative. I much prefer tutes in video format and I think you did a great job on both. Thanks so much for you continued contribution to DPC and all us members! Keep up the great work!
08/28/2007 04:09:06 PM · #30
if this is digital photography processing... and that's how people get the WOWs, than I'm in the wrong field.
08/28/2007 04:10:29 PM · #31
Originally posted by gerdez:

if this is digital photography processing... and that's how people get the WOWs, than I'm in the wrong field.

It's never too late to change careers. Best of luck to you. :D
08/28/2007 04:17:58 PM · #32
Originally posted by Art Roflmao:


It's never too late to change careers. Best of luck to you. :D

thank you, but in my opinion this is not art ... but then this is a free world, so I can speak my mind, don't I?

I'm not a photo artist, I admit, but I bet till I get 40 I'll know enough to get that damn shot out of the camera as I want, without having to spend 20 minutes on applying filters in photoshop. Maybe some levels, exposure correction and a color cast.. but that's all.

Message edited by author 2007-08-28 16:21:59.
08/28/2007 04:20:43 PM · #33
Originally posted by gerdez:

Originally posted by Art Roflmao:


It's never too late to change careers. Best of luck to you. :D

thank you, but in my opinion this is not art ... but then this is a free world, so I can speak my mind, don't I?


This is a free world, and you CAN speak your own mind, which you have freely. As has Art Roflmao.
08/28/2007 04:28:21 PM · #34
Originally posted by frisca:

This is a free world, and you CAN speak your own mind, which you have freely. As has Art Roflmao.


Quote from your userpage: What I can add is that I have a love-hate affair with my camera. I love it, i love holding it and I love taking photos of things that interest me, but I hate having to edit and display and half the time the pushing of the shutter is all the gratification I need.

This is what I'm talking about. And now I'll shut up.
08/28/2007 04:39:20 PM · #35
wow Judi!! Awesome job with this!!
08/28/2007 04:41:48 PM · #36
Originally posted by gerdez:

if this is digital photography processing... and that's how people get the WOWs, than I'm in the wrong field.

A bit abrasive for your first post here. This is a diverse and mostly friendly community that welcomes newcomers and respects their opinions and their subjective preferences and we all expect the same. We have personalities here ranging from photography purists to photoshop artists and everything in between. While we do have frequent, recurring debates on art vs. photography, it always ends the same - nobody's preferences are changed and we all agree to do what WE like and respect and appreciate each others differences.

So, welcome to DPC. :)

Message edited by author 2007-08-28 16:42:50.
08/28/2007 04:52:34 PM · #37
Originally posted by Art Roflmao:


A bit abrasive for your first post here.......

So, welcome to DPC. :)


Yes, I see it's a friendly community, and I joined a week ago I think, and yes that was my first post, but I just couldn't shut up on this one. I mean, photography is about putting your soul into the shot, to get it right, to show the world what you see, not to put a lot of Photoshop in it. Sorry if my opinion offended someone.

Thanx for the welcome.
08/28/2007 04:59:34 PM · #38
Awesome tutorial. Great job Judi!!!
08/28/2007 05:02:01 PM · #39
Wow! Well said Art.

Now, Judi... I think this was a great tutorial and showed many aspects of PP that I was unfamiliar with. Thanks for taking the time to put this together.
08/28/2007 05:22:53 PM · #40
Originally posted by gerdez:


I'm not a photo artist, I admit, but I bet till I get 40 I'll know enough to get that damn shot out of the camera as I want, without having to spend 20 minutes on applying filters in photoshop. Maybe some levels, exposure correction and a color cast.. but that's all.


ummmm....Judi's both a good photographer and has awesome Photoshop skills. She had a pretty good shot straight out of the camera. Then she showed what *can* be done with it, using Photoshop and some plugins. If I had started with the same original, I would have gone in a different direction, but I still appreciated seeing her approach, and learned a few things from the video. What's wrong with that?
08/28/2007 10:55:34 PM · #41
Isn't photoshop just the digital version of a darkroom? It takes less time, but you can get the same results (I think...correct me if I'm wrong) in a darkroom with the proper equipment, depending on how far you want to go with your image.
08/28/2007 11:46:21 PM · #42
Originally posted by gerdez:


Yes, I see it's a friendly community, and I joined a week ago I think, and yes that was my first post, but I just couldn't shut up on this one. I mean, photography is about putting your soul into the shot, to get it right, to show the world what you see, not to put a lot of Photoshop in it. Sorry if my opinion offended someone.


Just to offer a counterpoint, I would suggest for your consideration that "straight" photography, as you describe it, while it is indeed a wonderful and satisfying skill, is arguably less of an "art" than visualizing something like what Judi "saw" in this scene, and using tools of artistic expression (in this case, camera + photoshop + photomatix) to achieve that vision.

She and i are on the same page with images like this; there's a wonderful, creative freedom available in being able to use the mind's eye to create art from reality, and the camera as a tool along the way, not being limited to what the camera is able to do in its native rendering.

And this, of course, has been going on long before digital. Because I once worked with him, I use Ansel Adams as an example; many of his most famous and striking images bear only a superficial resemblance to what a tourist with a Kodak and some plus-x film could accomplish, in the same place and at the same time. His skills in previsualization and post-processing were legendary.

There's certainly room for all approaches.

**************

My only complaint here is I can't hear the voice-over, being deaf, so the tutorial is not as fulfilling for me as it is for the rest of you. But it seems very well done.

R.
08/28/2007 11:50:57 PM · #43
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by gerdez:


Yes, I see it's a friendly community, and I joined a week ago I think, and yes that was my first post, but I just couldn't shut up on this one. I mean, photography is about putting your soul into the shot, to get it right, to show the world what you see, not to put a lot of Photoshop in it. Sorry if my opinion offended someone.


Just to offer a counterpoint, I would suggest for your consideration that "straight" photography, as you describe it, while it is indeed a wonderful and satisfying skill, is arguably less of an "art" than visualizing something like what Judi "saw" in this scene, and using tools of artistic expression (in this case, camera + photoshop + photomatix) to achieve that vision.

She and i are on the same page with images like this; there's a wonderful, creative freedom available in being able to use the mind's eye to create art from reality, and the camera as a tool along the way, not being limited to what the camera is able to do in its native rendering.

And this, of course, has been going on long before digital. Because I once worked with him, I use Ansel Adams as an example; many of his most famous and striking images bear only a superficial resemblance to what a tourist with a Kodak and some plus-x film could accomplish, in the same place and at the same time. His skills in previsualization and post-processing were legendary.

There's certainly room for all approaches.

**************

My only complaint here is I can't hear the voice-over, being deaf, so the tutorial is not as fulfilling for me as it is for the rest of you. But it seems very well done.

R.


Thanks Bear...and everyone else. I have been following this discussion with intent. Curious to see what would come of it...and also what opinions came forth without me butting in.

I do apologise for not including a written tutorial as yet...but as I said earlier in the thread I just have to get a couple of major jobs out of the way and then I intend to put one together for Langdon to put with the tut.

I hope that helps.

Cheers

J
08/29/2007 12:18:39 AM · #44
Judi,

I am SO GRATEFUL for this tutorial.

Once again I want to THANK YOU for your generosity with your skills.

From one who admires - I am always so keen to be allowed to watch the masters at work.

You are a GEM!

Lisa
08/29/2007 01:58:00 AM · #45
Originally posted by Bear_Music:


Just to offer a counterpoint, I would suggest for your consideration that "straight" photography ...


OK, I admit I'm a rookie and I may have misconceptions about what photography is. I just expressed my point of view, with no intent to offend anyone. Sorry if I did.

As a beginner, learning by myself, I was always amazed by shots different people took and I just didn't seem to understand how they get those shots out of their camera. I thought it was because they used different techniques that I wasn't aware of and filters/lenses that I don't have at hand. I knew that digital photography involves Photoshop, I just never imagined that it's used to this extent. Now, as I watched this tutorial I felt like the kid who found out that there is no Santa. That's why I said what I said in my first post.

Message edited by author 2007-08-29 02:00:59.
08/29/2007 02:13:14 AM · #46
Originally posted by gerdez:

Originally posted by Art Roflmao:


A bit abrasive for your first post here.......

So, welcome to DPC. :)


Yes, I see it's a friendly community, and I joined a week ago I think, and yes that was my first post, but I just couldn't shut up on this one. I mean, photography is about putting your soul into the shot, to get it right, to show the world what you see, not to put a lot of Photoshop in it. Sorry if my opinion offended someone.

Thanx for the welcome.


Befor I say anything.
Welcome to DPC.

Many ways your views are close to my views on photography.
But ...

Don't you think that art is to have an open mind to other's peoples ideas. Art is also to accept the ways and things which normally accepted out of way.
Whether what Judi presented is true art or not. Its a way of doing things. We shall be open to it and welcome it.

08/29/2007 02:25:30 AM · #47
Awesome tutorial Judi.... I just love to see the work flow other people use and pick up new tips and ideas..... Thank you for sharing!
09/14/2007 02:15:41 PM · #48
Hmm, loved the tutorial apart from one bit where i get stumped :(

The part where you apply the masked areas, for the life of me i cant understand how you mask the certain areas and bring them in?

I can get the white boxes there but havent a clue how to mask areas within the white boxes. Sorry but i am still very much learning the art of PS anyone explain this for me?

Very interesting tutorial though!!
09/14/2007 04:43:21 PM · #49
Originally posted by Tanny:

Hmm, loved the tutorial apart from one bit where i get stumped :(

The part where you apply the masked areas, for the life of me i cant understand how you mask the certain areas and bring them in?

I can get the white boxes there but havent a clue how to mask areas within the white boxes. Sorry but i am still very much learning the art of PS anyone explain this for me?

Very interesting tutorial though!!


Okay...I go through that area quite a bit in the tutorial. You have the white mask to start with. Make sure the mask is active...that is...the mask on the layer palette has a white border and the layer itself on the layer palette is showing blue. Now you can use a black brush and paint straight onto the image, like I do in a couple of areas in that tut. And that will hide portions of that layer. Remember...black hides...white shows that portion of that layer.

OR

You can flood fill the mask with black ...make sure your foreground colour is black first.... by clicking on the image and then using a white brush to paint the areas of that mask that you want to show.

Let me know how you go...I may do another tut next week based on that.
09/15/2007 04:32:22 AM · #50
Thanks Judi just reading this has helped me considerably and although i think i have the idea it just needs ALOT of practice!

You make it look sooooo easy. Going to have a go at taking a shot today and following the tutorial through to see what mine turns out like......Dredd to think.

Now going to watch it again.

Thanks again

Nick
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