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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> RAW vs JPEG Debate
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07/14/2007 02:09:32 PM · #51
Gotcha...thanks for the example Brad and thanks for the input Leroy.
07/14/2007 07:07:29 PM · #52
Originally posted by benjikan:

I totally agree. All of my files are saved in TIFF or PSD when given to the publication. If I gave them a JPEG there would be an uproar and my credibility would be put in to question.

//anashcreation.com/thenashgallery/BenjaminKanarek/reload4?full=1


Yes, but again, that's not an argument about JPG vs. RAW. I create PSDs out of my JPGs all the time - that's how I edit my entries here, actually. I could just as easily spit out a TIFF file.

The final format isn't connected to the original format unless the editors insist on getting a RAW file.

Message edited by author 2007-07-14 19:08:11.
07/14/2007 07:14:42 PM · #53
Originally posted by MrEd:

I guess my REAL question is..."Why wouldn't you shoot in RAW and have more control over your photos?" I wonder if it's just a preference thing with no REAL benefit either way?


That's the wrong question for me, anyway. I don't know RAW, so in order for me to invest in learning, I need to know why I should bother.

Now, once you know both, then your question definitely applies.

So far, the point about expanded dynamic range is the best argument I've heard for bothering to learn RAW.
07/14/2007 07:24:31 PM · #54
Originally posted by levyj413:


So far, the point about expanded dynamic range is the best argument I've heard for bothering to learn RAW.


I'd agree that it is the best argument. 12+ bits of data compared to 8. Flexibility in sharpness, contrast, saturation, and curves follow closely with WB high up there too.
07/14/2007 07:30:45 PM · #55
Originally posted by levyj413:

Originally posted by MrEd:

I guess my REAL question is..."Why wouldn't you shoot in RAW and have more control over your photos?" I wonder if it's just a preference thing with no REAL benefit either way?


That's the wrong question for me, anyway. I don't know RAW, so in order for me to invest in learning, I need to know why I should bother.


the main question here is do you spend time post processing your pictures. If you do then RAW gives you more flexibility and it makes lot of sense.
But people like me who do not do post processing very much (because of any reason), shooting JPG is very good option.

(But here I shall make clear that many times for some shots I do think that if I had shot RAW it would be better. Because I realize that I can not do the post processing I wish to do with it).

07/14/2007 07:34:17 PM · #56
I keep hearing this claim about white balance. I fix colors in JPG all the time - that is, I load up a JPG in PS. How is that any different from fixing it in a RAW you load into PS? Color me confused.
07/14/2007 07:41:21 PM · #57
Check this out man. Nikon Capture NX. Download the demo and check it out. You process the raw file then bring it into PS for final processing. I use NX for a bunch of editing tasks including my b&w conversion. RAW rules for printing in my mind because of 12 bit color and the purity of an uncompressed file.

Message edited by author 2007-07-14 19:42:46.
07/14/2007 07:46:21 PM · #58
Originally posted by levyj413:

I keep hearing this claim about white balance. I fix colors in JPG all the time - that is, I load up a JPG in PS. How is that any different from fixing it in a RAW you load into PS? Color me confused.


I'm not trying to be a smart ass, but try making this:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5885/thumb/554887.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5885/thumb/554887.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

look like this :

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/701/thumb/541052.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/701/thumb/541052.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I only changed the WB setting in RAW conversion (to fluorescent) to make it wrong, otherwise, it's pretty much the same. If you go to correct the color and levels, you're going to get quite a bit of clipping and out of gamut colors.

WB issues are more than just color balance issues, the wrong choice in WB can cause clipping of the color gamut and other issues too.

Message edited by author 2007-07-14 20:00:26.
07/14/2007 07:47:50 PM · #59
to me this is all very simple...

Good JPEG is all I need. If I know I can get what I need right from the camera I shoot JPEG. If I'm not sure because of weird light or shot is extremely important to me I'll back myself up and shoot in RAW.

I think I'm experienced enough to get what I want from the camera. I can evaluate situation and setup camera the way I want to so I shoot JPEG most of the time.

That's just me :)

Nick
07/14/2007 10:09:19 PM · #60
My primary reason for shooting JPG is my new Canon G7 :)

I know I'm sacrificing dynamic range etc but it's a compromise I can live with for the kind of stuff I do.

Otherwise, I prefer the flexibility of RAW and always use it when I'm shooting with the DSLR.
07/14/2007 10:53:15 PM · #61
Originally posted by fotomann_forever:

Originally posted by levyj413:

I keep hearing this claim about white balance. I fix colors in JPG all the time - that is, I load up a JPG in PS. How is that any different from fixing it in a RAW you load into PS? Color me confused.


I'm not trying to be a smart ass, but try making this:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5885/thumb/554887.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/5885/thumb/554887.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

look like this :

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/701/thumb/541052.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/701/thumb/541052.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

I only changed the WB setting in RAW conversion (to fluorescent) to make it wrong, otherwise, it's pretty much the same. If you go to correct the color and levels, you're going to get quite a bit of clipping and out of gamut colors.

WB issues are more than just color balance issues, the wrong choice in WB can cause clipping of the color gamut and other issues too.


Thanks, Leroy! That's just the kind of demonstration I wanted. :)

I'm also thinking about what you said about only editing a relatively small percentage of your shots. That's me, too.

I'm getting closer to being sold on RAW. Enough so that I'll use it for a while and see how it goes.
07/15/2007 12:01:52 PM · #62
Originally posted by levyj413:


I'm getting closer to being sold on RAW. Enough so that I'll use it for a while and see how it goes.


Throw it in RAW+JPEG for a while. But then force yourself to play with the RAW files and ask questions about them. You'll be happy you did
07/15/2007 12:22:24 PM · #63
To try to wrap up this WB issue in simple terms:

1. The RAW capture is the way the camera "sees". No matter what form of output the camera gives you in the end, it began from a RAW capture. Sensors cannot "see" in JPG. The in-camera software reads the RAW data and generates a JPG or a TIFF or whatever file format you have instructed it to use.

2. All in-camera, after-exposure adjustments, like contrast, WB, saturation, sharpness, and so forth are used by the camera's software for the purpose of interpreting the RAW data and generating whatever file format you are using.

3. When you use a RAW converter as part of your workflow, you are taking those after-exposure adjustments out of the hands of the camera's software and putting them in your own hands. You can choose contrast, wb, saturation, sharpness etc in the RAW converter, and you can generate infinite variations if you wish. Each of these variations will basically be exactly what you would have gotten if you shot in JPG with those particular parameters.

4. The key variables you CANNOT change in RAW are the ones that affect pre-capture data: shutter speed, aperture, focus, ISO, and (for the most part) exposure.

6. Understanding this, RAW makes a tremendous amount of sense even as a "learning tool"; want to see what effect different WB would have? Instead of shooting 6 separate JPG files, just change the WB parameter in RAW.

7. The ONLY argument against using RAW is workflow considerations. You can create and spit our JPG's with incredible speed if you get your parameters right. But if you want to do serious "fine" photography, RAW is the only reasonable way to go. There is no downside to it at all.

R.
07/20/2007 01:57:47 AM · #64
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

To try to wrap up this WB issue in simple terms:

1. The RAW capture is the way the camera "sees". No matter what form of output the camera gives you in the end, it began from a RAW capture. Sensors cannot "see" in JPG. The in-camera software reads the RAW data and generates a JPG or a TIFF or whatever file format you have instructed it to use.

2. All in-camera, after-exposure adjustments, like contrast, WB, saturation, sharpness, and so forth are used by the camera's software for the purpose of interpreting the RAW data and generating whatever file format you are using.

3. When you use a RAW converter as part of your workflow, you are taking those after-exposure adjustments out of the hands of the camera's software and putting them in your own hands. You can choose contrast, wb, saturation, sharpness etc in the RAW converter, and you can generate infinite variations if you wish. Each of these variations will basically be exactly what you would have gotten if you shot in JPG with those particular parameters.

4. The key variables you CANNOT change in RAW are the ones that affect pre-capture data: shutter speed, aperture, focus, ISO, and (for the most part) exposure.

6. Understanding this, RAW makes a tremendous amount of sense even as a "learning tool"; want to see what effect different WB would have? Instead of shooting 6 separate JPG files, just change the WB parameter in RAW.

7. The ONLY argument against using RAW is workflow considerations. You can create and spit our JPG's with incredible speed if you get your parameters right. But if you want to do serious "fine" photography, RAW is the only reasonable way to go. There is no downside to it at all.

R.


These points are all of the reasons one could consider RAW as the only way to capture images. The differences are flagrant especially when using a highly tuned calibrated screen with a very high resolution. I just purchased the new Samsung 22" screen and am using it at its highest resolution. You can visually see the gradation improvements using RAW over JPEG. Take a bit of time to master the process and you will never look back...
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