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DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> Tackiest.... still don't get it
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12/27/2003 12:57:33 PM · #1
Despite this thread I still don't understand what this challenge is about......

It says "Tacky Holiday Decorations" as subject and the description explains that title as "Photograph the tackiest display of holiday cheer that you can find! :)"

My English to Dutch dictionary (and the dutch explanation translated back to english again):
tacky= sticky, in a bad state, tasteless, trashy
cheer= screem of joy, mood, joy, regale/ entertain (food & drinks)

So I don't get it, what has cheer got to do with decorations?
Is it about christmass balls that fell out of the three and stuff like that?
Bad or sticky food and drinks on a table?
Tasteless christmass trees?
Trashy girls cheering in front of the tree?

Decorations? Is it about whole houses/gardens, indoor/outdoor, the stuff shops do behind their windows? Must I see it as a sinlge item (a ball) or a whole set of stuff?

In other words: what are the normal words for tacky and cheer? What is precisely meant here?

(for the people who write the challenge descriptions: this kind of descriptions suck)
12/27/2003 01:04:41 PM · #2
Tacky essentially means "in bad taste." That can be because the decorations are cheap or ugly or because they are way overdone. Like the house that is so lit up, you can see it from outerspace and has 17 inflatable Santa's in the yard. For some people, if you have a nativity scene but have Santa in the creche, that's pretty tacky. Pretty much any sort of decoration that makes you go "ooh...what were they thinking??" would work.
12/27/2003 02:32:55 PM · #3
Originally posted by Azrifel:



Bad or sticky food and drinks on a table?
Tasteless christmass trees?

In other words: what are the normal words for tacky and cheer? What is precisely meant here?


As for the "cheer" part -- in this definition "Holiday Cheer" is an expression that can be translated as "the whole Christmas/New Year season" So anything related to Christmas, New Year's Eve, Hanukah would be appropriate. If your "holiday cheer" is tasteful, classy, elegant or beautiful it will not be "tacky".

12/27/2003 02:38:20 PM · #4
I thought the dangling beer cans tied together by fishing line off the roof of the house around the corner was in bad taste. But they make a pretty noise when the wind blows.

No, not taking THAT picture at all. hahahaha
12/27/2003 02:50:44 PM · #5
Originally posted by Azrifel:

Despite this thread I still don't understand what this challenge is about......

It says "Tacky Holiday Decorations" as subject and the description explains that title as "Photograph the tackiest display of holiday cheer that you can find! :)"

My English to Dutch dictionary (and the dutch explanation translated back to english again):
tacky= sticky, in a bad state, tasteless, trashy
cheer= screem of joy, mood, joy, regale/ entertain (food & drinks)

So I don't get it, what has cheer got to do with decorations?
Is it about christmass balls that fell out of the three and stuff like that?
Bad or sticky food and drinks on a table?
Tasteless christmass trees?
Trashy girls cheering in front of the tree?

Decorations? Is it about whole houses/gardens, indoor/outdoor, the stuff shops do behind their windows? Must I see it as a sinlge item (a ball) or a whole set of stuff?

In other words: what are the normal words for tacky and cheer? What is precisely meant here?

(for the people who write the challenge descriptions: this kind of descriptions suck)


I don't speak Dutch, Azrifel, but perhaps the German translation will give you a sense: Photografieren Sie die kitschigste Ausstellung von Weihnachtsfreude.
12/27/2003 02:58:58 PM · #6
when reading this i was reminded of a scene i saw last night on a major road near my house...there was a house with icicle lights hanging everywhere with a snowman and a neon palm tree in the front yard. the palm tree is totally tacky because what the hell does it have to do with christmas, hanauka, kwanza or winter in general.. it is the anti-decoration
12/27/2003 03:13:52 PM · #7
Originally posted by achiral:

when reading this i was reminded of a scene i saw last night on a major road near my house...there was a house with icicle lights hanging everywhere with a snowman and a neon palm tree in the front yard. the palm tree is totally tacky because what the hell does it have to do with christmas, hanauka, kwanza or winter in general.. it is the anti-decoration


There you go!
12/27/2003 03:21:04 PM · #8
Tacky is using paper plates with real silverware.

Message edited by author 2003-12-27 15:21:48.
12/27/2003 03:29:36 PM · #9
Originally posted by zeuszen:


I don't speak Dutch, Azrifel, but perhaps the German translation will give you a sense: Photografieren Sie die kitschigste Ausstellung von Weihnachtsfreude.


Having the same problem as Azrifel, it now sounds to me that "geschmacklos", i.e. tasteless, might be a better translation than "kitschig", at least when reading what the native speaker write about tacky.

Jörg

Message edited by author 2003-12-27 15:30:11.
12/27/2003 03:33:34 PM · #10
Originally posted by zeuszen:


I don't speak Dutch, Azrifel, but perhaps the German translation will give you a sense: Photografieren Sie die kitschigste Ausstellung von Weihnachtsfreude.

Kitch is also an American/Yiddish slang term for a useless, tasteless ... well, tacky decorative item.
12/27/2003 03:42:22 PM · #11
Originally posted by Harz_Joerg:

Originally posted by zeuszen:


I don't speak Dutch, Azrifel, but perhaps the German translation will give you a sense: Photografieren Sie die kitschigste Ausstellung von Weihnachtsfreude.


Having the same problem as Azrifel, it now sounds to me that "geschmacklos", i.e. tasteless, might be a better translation than "kitschig", at least when reading what the native speaker write about tacky.

Jörg

Wouldn't geschmacklos mean literally without taste, as a watery soup or bland cereal? The tacky kind of tasteless has more to do with inappropriateness, as in serving wine at an awards dinner for recovering alcoholics, or someone volunteering to serve meals to the homeless while wearing jewelry and a fur coat, or showing up at a formal wedding wearing a Harley-Davidson T-shirt.
12/27/2003 03:56:17 PM · #12
Originally posted by GeneralE:


Wouldn't geschmacklos mean literally without taste, as a watery soup or bland cereal?

Yes, a watery soup is literally "geschmacklos", but is'nt it in English also tasteless?!
But "geschmacklos" also means: without any sence of well-behaviour and bad-taste

Originally posted by GeneralE:


The tacky kind of tasteless has more to do with inappropriateness, as in serving wine at an awards dinner for recovering alcoholics, or someone volunteering to serve meals to the homeless while wearing jewelry and a fur coat, or showing up at a formal wedding wearing a Harley-Davidson T-shirt.


LOL:)
All these examples would be called "geschmacklos" in German, whereas "kitschig" is more like trashy, but not in the sence of bad taste, rather overdone, to much of everything.

Message edited by author 2003-12-27 15:56:58.
12/27/2003 03:56:44 PM · #13
Here's a recomendation....If going into a strangers yard, when asked what you are doing, be sure to tell them you're entering a photo of their place into a tackiest decoration contest. They'll love you for it and most likely offer you some hot chocolate and cookies. <wink> Just kidding, have fun everybody!!!
12/27/2003 03:59:05 PM · #14
"geschmacklos"(German) or the Dutch equivalent "smakeloos" can mean "without taste" if food is concerned, but it can also mean "showing bad taste" / "inappropriate" when other matters is concerned.
12/27/2003 04:08:40 PM · #15
Originally posted by Harz_Joerg:

Originally posted by GeneralE:


Wouldn't geschmacklos mean literally without taste, as a watery soup or bland cereal?

Yes, a watery soup is literally "geschmacklos", but is'nt it in English also tasteless?!
But "geschmacklos" also means: without any sence of well-behaviour and bad-taste

Originally posted by GeneralE:


The tacky kind of tasteless has more to do with inappropriateness, as in serving wine at an awards dinner for recovering alcoholics, or someone volunteering to serve meals to the homeless while wearing jewelry and a fur coat, or showing up at a formal wedding wearing a Harley-Davidson T-shirt.


LOL:)
All these examples would be called "geschmacklos" in German, whereas "kitschig" is more like trashy, but not in the sence of bad taste, rather overdone, to much of everything.

Yes ... I can see the overdone connection as well ... it's been more than 30 years since I took German (from an Estonian teacher) and haven't really kept up with it since. I'm frequently astonished at how much I can still intelligently guess at if not translate.
12/27/2003 04:29:05 PM · #16
Tacky is a yard filled with cheap Christmas decorations and 12 pink flamingos. What they have to do with Christmas I'll never know. And no I do not live in Florida?
12/27/2003 05:29:37 PM · #17
Originally posted by Azrifel:

(for the people who write the challenge descriptions: this kind of descriptions suck)


well, after all these explanations you will not only know the meaning of the word "suck", but the meaning of the word "tacky" as well...

i thought the description was fine, myself... was full of anticipation, too... but instead, i am sitting this challenge out because i have a horrible horrible horrible flu... bummer! but i am looking forward to seeing all the submissions!
12/27/2003 05:35:02 PM · #18
Geschmacklos would work. It is as formal a term as 'tasteless' is in English. Kitschig is more idiomatic even than tacky, and a bolder translation, to my sense.

The kind of person who'd say tacky here, IMO, would be socially at ease with one who'd say kitschig in German.
12/27/2003 06:09:18 PM · #19
Remember folks , whats tacky to you wasn't tacky to the person that put it up.
12/27/2003 06:32:55 PM · #20
Originally posted by faidoi:

Remember folks , whats tacky to you wasn't tacky to the person that put it up.


I think the fact that it wasn't tacky to them is what makes it tacky.
12/27/2003 07:31:56 PM · #21
For what it's worth my perception of tacky is: cheap'n'nasty, tasteless (subjective I know), unharmonious or just plain brash and cheeky. I'll have little problem with my entry fitting this description!

I tend to think of the house lights scene in National Lampoons Christmas Vacation, played to tune of 'Oh Come All Ye Faithful'!
12/27/2003 08:35:56 PM · #22
Remember, if you enter a tacky shot, you'll end up with one in your portfolio too.
12/27/2003 08:45:09 PM · #23
Originally posted by zeuszen:

Remember, if you enter a tacky shot, you'll end up with one in your portfolio too.

And everyone can mark it as their favorite and make you (and them) look weird ...
12/27/2003 09:40:14 PM · #24
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by zeuszen:

Remember, if you enter a tacky shot, you'll end up with one in your portfolio too.

And everyone can mark it as their favorite and make you (and them) look weird ...


which could, and will probably happen, cuz, while we all cringe while driving past some of these houses, honestly, who doesn't love the Griswalds? :)
12/27/2003 11:38:56 PM · #25
I have heard the word tacky all my life my mother used that word when something wasn't the way it was supposed to be If your socks didn't match that was tacky and etc.
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