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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Lens cleaning for the first time -- chlorinated wa
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06/06/2007 02:18:53 PM · #1
I recently took my 30d and the attached lens to a pool, and I'm afraid a bit of water got on the lens. There are tiny spots on the glass, and I hope these are just water spots. Firstly, does anyone know if chlorinated water can damage lens glass (like salt water is damaging), and how should I clean the lens the first time?

I've done some searching, and lens pens and pec pads/eclipse solution seem to be the favorites. Should lens cleaning always be wet cleaning?

Thanks for any help.
06/06/2007 02:22:21 PM · #2
Step one - a soft cloth - like a t-shirt. Rub it good and the spots should go away. If that doesn't work then use a slightly dampened soft cloth. Cleaners are usually unnecessary. Pool water shouldn't cause any long-term damage. For that matter, a little salt water won't either; I take my cameras to the beach almost every weekend.

06/06/2007 02:25:37 PM · #3
cotton cloths are OK to use on lens, I was under the impression that cotton was too rough for a lens.
06/06/2007 02:28:18 PM · #4
Originally posted by klorineforbrains:

cotton cloths are OK to use on lens, I was under the impression that cotton was too rough for a lens.


Nah, I clean my lenses with my shirt 90% of the time. Today's lenses have good protective coatings. You wouldn't want to use cotton to clean your sensor, but for lenses its fine, and don't be afraid to rub if you have spots.
06/06/2007 02:30:42 PM · #5
Are the back lenses (the ones covered by the dust cap when not in use and "inside" the body when attached) much more vulnerable, because i used a soft cloth designed for lenses on one of those once and badly scratched the inner glass. Thankfully that was a cheap lens. Thanks for the quick replys.
06/06/2007 02:32:59 PM · #6
Originally posted by klorineforbrains:

Are the back lenses (the ones covered by the dust cap when not in use and "inside" the body when attached) much more vulnerable, because i used a soft cloth designed for lenses on one of those once and badly scratched the inner glass. Thankfully that was a cheap lens. Thanks for the quick replys.


I don't know the answer for that one, but I would assume the back element would have less protection because it has much less chance of getting dirty. Dust would be the biggest issue for the back element and you can clear that away easily with a soft brush.
06/06/2007 02:59:29 PM · #7
Make sure the cloth does not have a grain of sand, for instance, in it. If it does, you will simply regrind your lens.

Message edited by author 2007-06-06 14:59:40.
06/06/2007 07:58:31 PM · #8
glasses wipes are perfect they are like babywipes but contain no soap, very very good i use them all the time and never had a problem, you can but these at home bargains, asda and your toiletry stores

Message edited by author 2007-06-06 20:00:27.
06/07/2007 04:51:40 PM · #9
i've tried steel wool, but I'd recommend against that
:]

Jack
06/07/2007 05:40:45 PM · #10
Only thing I would add is blow the lens glass off before wiping. That way any grit that may be on it won't stay to scratch the glass coatings.

Use one of these:
Rocket Blower

Message edited by author 2007-06-07 17:42:10.
06/07/2007 05:45:51 PM · #11
Be careful when wiping off your lens nomatter what the case.

I am a stupid, stupid kid. I have a camera that is "indestructable". I washed the lens with shampoo and water (camera is waterproof) and the coating came off. I didn't really know that the coating was off, so when I dropped the camera in the sand, I tried to wipe out the sand with my shirt, and now my lens is scratched permanently on one side, and you can tell on my full-scale images.

Just don't do stupid things with your camera..
06/07/2007 07:30:14 PM · #12
Wiping off sand would probably scratch a lens even if the coating was intact. Best to gently flush with water to get off sand. Easy enough with a waterproof camera; but most cameras and SLR lenses aren't, so be careful not to splash! A syringe works nicely; throw one in your camera bag for emergencies.

Also note that water spots are mineral deposits, and can scratch lenses (or their coating) if you try to rub them off dry. The scratches will be very small, even unnoticable, but will build up over time and start acting like a soft focus filter. Wet it first. Water is fine; lens cleaner has the advantage that it dries faster and spot-free.
06/07/2007 07:44:56 PM · #13
A couple thoughts... as dr rick posted, water spots are mostly minerals, and as such *could* scratch coatings if wiped over dry. So, remember that "like dissolves like" and use a water-based lens cleaning solution on a lint-free wipe (like a pec pad). First, blow off any dry dust that may be on the lens.
I've often had spots that appear and are not removed by the normal lens cleaning solution (eclipse, which is just 100% methanol) that I use. In these cases, I often just breathe on the lens, then immediately wipe it with eclipse. The condensed water from my breath dissolves the water-based spots, and once in solution, they are easily removed with the eclipse. The eclipse dries nearly instantly, leaving no residue.
Also, don't ever scrub or buff. Use as few strokes as possible, and with very light pressure.

Message edited by author 2007-06-07 19:46:02.
06/07/2007 08:02:41 PM · #14
Zeiss Lens Clothes
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