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02/12/2007 12:26:02 PM · #51
I'll bring the beads.
02/12/2007 12:28:54 PM · #52
Originally posted by scarbrd:

2 words

Mardi Gras

;-)


Can we run 'Street Photography II' next week then too please ? Just hit the 24th one way or another ;)
02/12/2007 12:32:20 PM · #53
Originally posted by alfresco:

I'll bring the beads.


I think I speak for everyone on this, please keep your shirt on.
02/12/2007 01:02:33 PM · #54
467667.jpg

Taken some years ago on 35mm film, and scanned with a flatbed,
just wonder how somthing like this would go down, I no the quality is crap, I'm just talking about the sceen

Message edited by author 2007-02-12 13:28:54.
02/12/2007 01:07:34 PM · #55
Originally posted by scarbrd:

Originally posted by alfresco:

I'll bring the beads.


I think I speak for everyone on this, please keep your shirt on.


I was featured in "Polacks Gone Wild IV", I'm a star!!
02/12/2007 01:08:36 PM · #56
Originally posted by alfresco:


I was featured in "Polacks Gone Wild IV", I'm a star!!


ooh ooh...where can I get a copy? !!!
02/12/2007 01:18:31 PM · #57
The challenge description mentioned Henri Cartier-Bresson as an example, but said nothing about emulating his style. An endless stream of pathetic homeless will not garner much interest from me. There is a near infinite variety of street scenes and this should provoke some creativity!

Message edited by author 2007-02-12 13:19:06.
02/12/2007 01:43:00 PM · #58
Originally posted by ElGordo:

The challenge description mentioned Henri Cartier-Bresson as an example, but said nothing about emulating his style. An endless stream of pathetic homeless will not garner much interest from me. There is a near infinite variety of street scenes and this should provoke some creativity!


Same here. I think portraits of the homeless are cliche, exploitive, and show little imagination (read boring).
02/12/2007 01:48:24 PM · #59
i agree

Originally posted by ElGordo:

An endless stream of pathetic homeless will not garner much interest from me.
02/12/2007 01:53:37 PM · #60
What do you want me to take pictures of?
EDIT: I'm harassing in my quietly funny way where only I laugh ...
but seriously, I think even if every person involved a homeless or jobless or wandering human in their image, I could still enjoy looking at the images ...
I mean, who wants to see 500 images of any subject? ;P ... giving scores on all those images of anything is tough sometimes.

Originally posted by hopper:

i agree

Originally posted by ElGordo:

An endless stream of pathetic homeless will not garner much interest from me.


Message edited by author 2007-02-12 13:56:33.
02/12/2007 02:08:29 PM · #61
Be careful out there ... you never know who might be looking:
467699.jpg
Took this last week when the Queen Mary visited San Francisco for the first time ... the boat was a boat, but the hordes of people swarming the dock where she was berthed were fabulous ... this wasn't my best, just the most humorous of the bunch. Missed the challenge by a week!
02/12/2007 02:46:28 PM · #62
interesting 'article' by Chris Weeks...
Street Photography for the Purist
02/12/2007 03:32:28 PM · #63
Originally posted by rswank:

interesting 'article' by Chris Weeks...
Street Photography for the Purist


ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE article ... but you did not respect his wishes ... stated in the last (and NOT in small print) line.

"Intended for use by deviantArt.com members and subscribers May
not be posted or distributed at any other site or location."
02/12/2007 03:57:16 PM · #64
Gordon, I read the links you posted - not sure why you say that the line "can I take your picture" is the worst first line. The article links seem to concur with my approach (posted earlier) - and in fact just saying "can I take your picture?" is all it takes... I mentioned earlier that you need to establish some kind of gentle interaction (no big explanations needed really just letting the people around you see you with a camera)so that the public/street people aren't caught unawares. I actually had one guy sitting nearby selling something from his wheelchair - and his friend said "hey take his picture!". I took one and then the guy in the wheelchair said "you have to ask me first", and I smiled and said "CAN I take your picture please?" - he smiled and said "yes now you can take my picture". The more time you spend in a spot, the more you relax and the easier it gets.

Originally posted by Gordon:

Originally posted by magenmarie:

Congrats on being able to approach them! I"m sooooo nervous about doing that!!! What did you tell them? That it is for a contest? Or that you are just a photog out taking photos? I'm petrified of what to say?!?!? !


The links I posted above talk a lot about how to approach people - if you want them to be aware of you shooting. The worst first line seems to be 'hi, can I take your picture?'
02/12/2007 04:15:28 PM · #65
Originally posted by Greetmir:

Originally posted by rswank:

interesting 'article' by Chris Weeks...
Street Photography for the Purist


ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE article ... but you did not respect his wishes ... stated in the last (and NOT in small print) line.

"Intended for use by deviantArt.com members and subscribers May
not be posted or distributed at any other site or location."


Whoops, it has been months since I last looked at it.
I thought that you had to be registered at DA to d/l it.
Guess not.
Don't look at the above article unless you are a member of DA then :P
02/12/2007 04:37:08 PM · #66
Originally posted by faery:

Gordon, I read the links you posted - not sure why you say that the line "can I take your picture" is the worst first line. The article links seem to concur with my approach (posted earlier) - and in fact just saying "can I take your picture?" is all it takes...


I think you explained it best yourself, when you said 'I don't think shoving a camera at someone and clicking is wise...strangers need some time to adjust to your presence too (you're also a stranger!).' "Can I take your picture?" as an opening line is the verbal equivalent of doing just that.

It raises more questions and doubts than it answers, lots of questions like 'why me?' 'what for?' 'who are you?' 'what are you using it for?' and so on. If you start out answering some of those doubts and questions, before you ask - the results change.

The hour long podcast I linked to talks about that in a lot more depth. It's just one way to do street photography though, not the only way.

Message edited by author 2007-02-12 16:43:53.
02/12/2007 04:43:30 PM · #67
Originally posted by faery:

Gordon, I read the links you posted - not sure why you say that the line "can I take your picture" is the worst first line. The article links seem to concur with my approach (posted earlier) - and in fact just saying "can I take your picture?" is all it takes... I mentioned earlier that you need to establish some kind of gentle interaction (no big explanations needed really just letting the people around you see you with a camera)so that the public/street people aren't caught unawares. I actually had one guy sitting nearby selling something from his wheelchair - and his friend said "hey take his picture!". I took one and then the guy in the wheelchair said "you have to ask me first", and I smiled and said "CAN I take your picture please?" - he smiled and said "yes now you can take my picture". The more time you spend in a spot, the more you relax and the easier it gets.

Originally posted by Gordon:

Originally posted by magenmarie:

Congrats on being able to approach them! I"m sooooo nervous about doing that!!! What did you tell them? That it is for a contest? Or that you are just a photog out taking photos? I'm petrified of what to say?!?!? !


The links I posted above talk a lot about how to approach people - if you want them to be aware of you shooting. The worst first line seems to be 'hi, can I take your picture?'


From a photojournalist perspective, asking to take someones picture leads to posing, setting up, non-candid types of shots. You will at least lose some degree of spontaneity.

Legally, you don't need permission to photograph someone of something out in public. Some may object, but that doesn't mean it can't be done.

The key is to never let them know they've been photographed, unless you want them to pose, say for an environmental photograph.

I doubt many of Henri Cartier-Bresson subject were even aware that a picture was being taken.

This may sound somewhat deceptive, but that's what street photography is all about IMO, capturing a true moment, not a set up. Not to say a setup couldn't work or would be DNMC, just saying if you look at Henri Cartier-Bresson's work you'll see very few setups in his "street" work.

Message edited by author 2007-02-12 16:44:03.
02/12/2007 04:46:13 PM · #68
Originally posted by scarbrd:

This may sound somewhat deceptive, but that's what street photography is all about IMO, capturing a true moment, not a set up. Not to say a setup couldn't work or would be DNMC, just saying if you look at Henri Cartier-Bresson's work you'll see very few setups in his "street" work.


I would agree that that is what HCB's style of street photography was about. But it isn't what I would say that street photography is solely about. Though the challenge definition is odder than normal in terms of what is expected. If it is to be an HCB style challenge, we'd all better strap on our 50mm equivalent lenses as well. E.g., What's a 'street photography technique' ?

They are certainly very different things to work with an engaged subject or to just observe and capture unawares.

Message edited by author 2007-02-12 16:56:55.
02/12/2007 06:14:25 PM · #69
Originally posted by scarbrd:

2 words

Mardi Gras

;-)


Yeah! ... Good timing of challenge for people in THAT neck of the woods for sure! Lots of dynamic stuff gonna happen. I feel, though, that a personal poignant moment captured will be more appealing for this challenge and would like to suggest that you make the Mardi Gras celebrations background interest to that aim, even though this advice may help you thoroughly trash my entry. LOL
02/12/2007 11:07:14 PM · #70
I scanned through this thread and didn't see if this was posted: Wikipedia has a great article and info on Street Photography. Check it out:

Street Photography
02/12/2007 11:44:33 PM · #71
Originally posted by Redjulep:

I scanned through this thread and didn't see if this was posted: Wikipedia has a great article and info on Street Photography. Check it out:

Street Photography


AWESOME FRIKKIN LINK!!! Thank you!!!
02/13/2007 12:14:55 AM · #72
Dumb question time.

All the discusion here is about taking candid photographs of strangers - that seems to be the point of the challenge, and that seems to be how most of you understand it. Is it DNMC if it doesn't contain an actual street in it? What if the scene is a back alley, or cropped to exclude the tarmac, or of a covered walkway?

I've just got back from spending my lunch break shooting and am worried that I will be bopped on the head by the DNMC brigade because my (hypothetically) my shot is of a covered walkway.
02/13/2007 12:57:36 AM · #73
bump.
02/13/2007 01:02:09 AM · #74
Humans in an urban environment, up close and personal. Thats my understanding of it, anyway. If your hypothetical scene doesn't have a person as the subject, it probably wont do well.
02/13/2007 01:04:14 AM · #75
Paul, I don't think that there absolutely MUST be a street of some kind in the picture. This will be one of those interpretation issues again, but my understanding of street photography is going out in the streets and getting shots of whatever subject you fancy.
There is always the chance that if you have no tarmac or any kind of street/walkway/whatever in the shot that someone will give you a DNMC, but that would be taking the title of the challenge too literally, my opinion.

Jan.
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