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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Metal breakdown in Manfrotto
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Showing posts 1 - 14 of 14, (reverse)
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02/06/2007 02:09:28 AM · #1
Okies...can someone help me here. I need to get my Manfrotto 190CL tripod passed for underground coal mining. This is what the mine require.

“GRADE OF ALUMINIUM”

The percentage of magnesium and titanium must be less than 6% by mass.

Obtain a chemical/metallurgical make up of the aluminium or the grade of aluminium.


I have just spoken to my supplier and they said it is going to take a week to get a reply from Italy. I need the information urgently....can someone help me here.
02/06/2007 02:21:31 AM · #2
I found this, but it doesn't say much:

Click on "Material"
02/06/2007 02:30:54 AM · #3
Thanks Becky. We worked out that there are two variations of aluminium and a Titanium/Magnesium breakdown. What we need to determine is if there is a less than 6% mass. Over that and we won't be allowed to take it down there. As it is I have to carry a Methanometer with my equipment which records methane levels put out by the mine which if it goes above .5% I have to remove my equipment from the mine.
02/06/2007 02:50:45 AM · #4
Judi

What you need to do is get a "positive materials identification" (PMI) done, which will tell you exactly what grade material is used in the tripod and the composition. This is done by an instrument like this //www.nitonuk.co.uk/xrf/ which gives you results about 15s.

These machines are available in Australia from non-destructive testing companies such as Intico (//www.intico.com.au) and pndt (//www.pndt.com.au) and, strangely enough, I have one at work. If you live in either Darwin, Melbourne or Perth I may be able to sort something out for you (sorry can't promise though).
02/06/2007 02:54:42 AM · #5
Just a quick question: what about the magnesium body of the 5D?
02/06/2007 03:12:02 AM · #6
I wonder if you can find out by removing part of one leg and having it checked for specific gravity of the metal. The mine lab may be able to do that well enough to determine which alloy you have if there are only two alloys in question.
I wouldn't be concerned about the tripod as much as about you being down there. I have seen your SP's and there may be a fire by spontaneous combustion of some of the miners when they see you. : )
I wonder if there is a link on line where you can find out the exact weight in grams of each of the models you need to know about? They may be a few grams apart in weight.

Message edited by author 2007-02-06 03:19:22.
02/06/2007 03:12:22 AM · #7
Originally posted by Mr_Pants:

Just a quick question: what about the magnesium body of the 5D?


All my lenses and body are ok as they are painted...therefore the metal is not exposed. But...all the equipment A(including my studio lighting) still gets tested and tagged both physically and on the board. I have this done every 6 months...but I haven't had to take this tripod down before. My partner flew to New Zealand today so I couldn't use the one that is already passed.

Casuist...I live in Central Qld...do you know of one here?
02/06/2007 04:33:17 AM · #8
Central Qld may be pushing it a bit.

Having a look at the Manfrotto website it doesn't look good for the tripod. The site says that it is "all metal" contruction and has aluminium listed as the material. The majority of commerical aluminium alloys will contain between ~94% Al for 5056 grade (Al/Mg) to 99% (refined). To maintain as low a weight as possible I would assume that your tripod would have as much Aluminium as possile. Have a look for any markings or numbers on the tripod, this may tell you the correct grade (4 numbers for Al alloys)

In terms of hazardous areas many places, primarily oil & gas facilities and those with potential explosive atmospheres they don't tend to like aluminium too much, either because of Al dust or static and the potential for sparks, usually they are allowed though with appropriate controls. Personnally though I'd be more worried about the canary dropping

02/06/2007 04:46:56 AM · #9
Originally posted by casuist:

Central Qld may be pushing it a bit.

Having a look at the Manfrotto website it doesn't look good for the tripod. The site says that it is "all metal" contruction and has aluminium listed as the material. The majority of commerical aluminium alloys will contain between ~94% Al for 5056 grade (Al/Mg) to 99% (refined). To maintain as low a weight as possible I would assume that your tripod would have as much Aluminium as possile. Have a look for any markings or numbers on the tripod, this may tell you the correct grade (4 numbers for Al alloys)

In terms of hazardous areas many places, primarily oil & gas facilities and those with potential explosive atmospheres they don't tend to like aluminium too much, either because of Al dust or static and the potential for sparks, usually they are allowed though with appropriate controls. Personnally though I'd be more worried about the canary dropping


I believe that under the ATEX directive, aluminium is not allowed in zones 2, 1 or 0, as there can be small sparks produced when alumium comes into contact with steel. Mobile towers and ladders, for instance, must be GRP.
02/06/2007 06:19:45 AM · #10
Hmmm...this is great info for what I need. I will have a talk with the inspectors at the site. Thanks heaps everyone.
02/06/2007 09:11:09 AM · #11
Originally posted by Mr_Pants:

I believe that under the ATEX directive, aluminium is not allowed in zones 2, 1 or 0


Not sure the same applies in Australia, would have to brush up on my Hazardous Area Classification (good thing I'm not in the HSE department) but we won't tell the regulator about those aluminium heat exchangers we have :-)

Originally posted by Mr_Pants:

as there can be small sparks produced when alumium comes into contact with steel.

I knew there was something more important than what I said, couldn't for the life of me remember though
02/06/2007 09:30:55 AM · #12
I would bet that the tripod is fine, as AFAIK most common Al alloys are less than that 6% (6061 for example is .8-1.2% Mg and .15% max Ti by weight). Proving that it's good to go may be somewhat trickier though.
The tripod is almost certainly anodized too, so if they're not concerned about the camera because it is painted, I would think the same would apply to anodized Al parts...
02/06/2007 03:52:02 PM · #13
Hmmm...well I think my best bet is to wait for word from Italy...hopefully they will be in within the week...! As for tomorrows shoot...I may have to either wrap the entire tripod (ack!) or freeball it.

Thanks everyone.
02/07/2007 01:27:34 PM · #14
Originally posted by Judi:

All my lenses and body are ok as they are painted...therefore the metal is not exposed.

You should have bought the black one (190CLB) :-)
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