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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Flash brackets that keep flash vertical
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01/19/2007 10:58:22 AM · #1
I'm shopping for a flash bracket. I don't like the flash-flip type of brackets (such as the popular CustomBrackets Junior), because the flash ends up oriented sideways when shooting in vertical orientation, and it's important for me to be able to bounce off my speedlight's pull-out white card.

I would also like to have something unobtrusive, so the flash brackets with huge grips and stands don't appeal to me.

I have narrowed my search to the following several brackets. If anyone used any of them, I'd love to hear some feedback. If you can recommend a bracket that has a similar design and costs below $200, I'd be grateful for a link.

Stroboframe Camera Flip bracket
Stroboframe Stroboflip VH
Newton Flash Rotator
01/19/2007 11:01:18 AM · #2
There's an external flash for your Barbie Camera?
01/19/2007 11:04:50 AM · #3
instead of a flash bracket you might try the lightsphere



Message edited by author 2007-01-19 11:05:26.
01/19/2007 11:18:57 AM · #4
I've been using the Stroboframe Pro-RL Bracket for 2 years now. The actual rotating part is not the smoothest, it takes some getting used to, but I really like where the handle in the front puts my hand in perfect position for zooming leaving the right hand to just press the shutter button. There's a quick tilt function too so you can easily tilt the flash like if you're really close to a subject and need to tilt it down a little bit, or if you're shooting down at a good angle but bouncing off the ceiling you can tilt it back to keep the flash aimed at the ceiling.

edit: oh yeah, I always use it with the Lightsphere as well.

Message edited by author 2007-01-19 11:25:25.
01/19/2007 03:15:03 PM · #5
Originally posted by Telehubbie:

I've been using the Stroboframe Pro-RL Bracket for 2 years now.

Thanks for the input!

Originally posted by jaxsond:

instead of a flash bracket you might try the lightsphere

Does it really *replace* a flash bracket? I think that, when shooting a vertical, the shadows (although they would be softer) would still be sideways.
01/19/2007 03:18:48 PM · #6
Originally posted by jaxsond:

instead of a flash bracket you might try the lightsphere


In my experience the lightsphere doesn't work in large areas very well (notice how in Gary's videos he's normally either really close to his subject or in a hallway). A flash bracket would still be helpful / necessary in situations where the lightsphere would be too weak.
01/19/2007 03:23:40 PM · #7
Stroboframe Qucikflip

I've used the Quick Flip since 1994. Got it when I was a PJ, now it comes in handy at weddings and other places where my Lightsphere would be too inefficient. Yes, the LS isn't the end all be all. :-)
01/19/2007 03:26:13 PM · #8
I got started with the Custom Brackets QRS-EV and I have loved each time I used it. It is sturdy, pretty light for a beefy bracket and fits very well into my hands.
01/19/2007 03:41:16 PM · #9
Originally posted by Shakalaka:

Stroboframe Qucikflip

Does it keep the flash vertical when you turn the camera for a vertical shot? It looks like the flash will be positioned above the lens in a horizontal position, which I am trying to avoid.
01/19/2007 03:42:20 PM · #10
Originally posted by ericwoo:

I got started with the Custom Brackets QRS-EV and I have loved each time I used it. It is sturdy, pretty light for a beefy bracket and fits very well into my hands.

I looked at this one, too. Seems like a bit too bulky for what I like. Probably not so when mated to a D2X.
01/19/2007 03:44:00 PM · #11
Originally posted by agenkin:

Originally posted by Shakalaka:

Stroboframe Qucikflip

Does it keep the flash vertical when you turn the camera for a vertical shot? It looks like the flash will be positioned above the lens in a horizontal position, which I am trying to avoid.


No it doesn't keep the flash vertical.
01/19/2007 03:55:55 PM · #12
The QRS is also nice and a bit less beefy. I am not sure how any of them will fit with the Barbie cam, though.
01/19/2007 10:29:53 PM · #13
Originally posted by ericwoo:

I am not sure how any of them will fit with the Barbie cam, though.

I use the Barbie camera for studio work only. The bracket is for my other camera.
01/19/2007 10:31:33 PM · #14
Originally posted by agenkin:


I use the Barbie camera for studio work only.


LOL, I sooo would try that, just to see how the model reacted.
01/19/2007 10:37:27 PM · #15
I'm using a newton bracket:

//www.newtoncamerabrackets.com/

It's a really well made bit of kit, and works really well for event work where you want to bounce flash all evening long...
01/19/2007 10:46:28 PM · #16
I personally favor a lightsphere on a bracket. The LS is only for diffusion, the bracket is for separation from the camera.

I only used it this way once, borrowed the bracket from a friend, and loved it.

Message edited by author 2007-01-19 22:46:49.
01/20/2007 12:12:28 AM · #17
Originally posted by KiwiChris:

I'm using a newton bracket:
//www.newtoncamerabrackets.com/
It's a really well made bit of kit, and works really well for event work where you want to bounce flash all evening long...

Which one, the camera rotator, or the flash rotator?

The Newton Flash Rotator shows that it has a tripod socket, but I don't understand how that can be useful, provided the flash is rotated, but not the camera. :)

Do you suppose the Newton bracket can accomodate a RC2 QR adapter? It looks like the bracket wraps the camera pretty tightly, so I'm worried that the adapter would raise the camera unacceptably high.
01/20/2007 01:35:05 AM · #18
//www.reallyrightstuff.com/flash/index.html

The mac daddy of flash brackets... i want one but haven't dished out the bux for it yet...

01/20/2007 01:37:04 AM · #19
Originally posted by jaxsond:

instead of a flash bracket you might try the lightsphere


A lightsphere won't replace a flash bracket. One thing you have to consider when using those things is how much flash output power you lose. They are fine for work when your subject is relatively close to you and you are working in confined spaces where the bounce will actually be effective.
01/20/2007 02:09:52 AM · #20
Originally posted by jmsetzler:

A lightsphere won't replace a flash bracket. One thing you have to consider when using those things is how much flash output power you lose. They are fine for work when your subject is relatively close to you and you are working in confined spaces where the bounce will actually be effective.


I thought that was the point of the LS reflector dishes.
01/20/2007 02:59:06 AM · #21
Originally posted by chimericvisions:

Originally posted by jmsetzler:

A lightsphere won't replace a flash bracket. One thing you have to consider when using those things is how much flash output power you lose. They are fine for work when your subject is relatively close to you and you are working in confined spaces where the bounce will actually be effective.


I thought that was the point of the LS reflector dishes.


Anything you put in front of your flash lens restricts its ability to put light forward, therefore cutting its effective power by some amount. The lightsphere redirects your flash output in just about every direction, so your effective power in the forward direction is probably about 10-15% of what it could be.

The lightsphere is designed to reduce shadows created by a flash shooting in a forward direction. If there is nothing close enough above, to the left, and to the right of your subject, the light sphere is not effective. The lightsphere simply throws light in all directions, not just forward. I'm not really familiar with the lightsphere, but I do use an omnibounce, which is similar, but maybe not as good as a lighsphere.

The purpose of the flash bracket is to keep the flash above the camera, which will eliminate those left/right shadows that are cast by the flash when it's hanging to one side. Whether or not a lightsphere or an omnibounce can accomplish this simply depends on the space you are working in.

01/20/2007 03:32:13 AM · #22
Originally posted by Spazmo99:

There's an external flash for your Barbie Camera?


He also has a D50 OMG lol
01/20/2007 06:32:51 AM · #23
I've had Stroboframe Camera Flip bracket for a while... and love it .... the camera flips easily and the whole bracket is easy to handle.
01/20/2007 11:39:12 AM · #24
Originally posted by jmsetzler:

//www.reallyrightstuff.com/flash/index.html
The mac daddy of flash brackets... i want one but haven't dished out the bux for it yet...

I looked at this one - it looks awesome: light, unobtrusive, and very flexible, but I'm not sure it's worth the price tag for me, I only shoot with a flash rarely.
01/20/2007 03:16:31 PM · #25
Originally posted by agenkin:

Originally posted by jmsetzler:

//www.reallyrightstuff.com/flash/index.html
The mac daddy of flash brackets... i want one but haven't dished out the bux for it yet...

I looked at this one - it looks awesome: light, unobtrusive, and very flexible, but I'm not sure it's worth the price tag for me, I only shoot with a flash rarely.


It is expensive. It's one of those situations where you can get the best available and be happy with it forever though.
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