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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> ... where to begin?
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12/30/2006 06:10:31 AM · #1
*hem hem*

my first forum post? :o

anyway, my question is probably a lot simpler than the answer. :) I got a Canon Ixux 65 for christmas, and I'd like to try my hand at photography worthy of dpc... but I don't really know where to start. I suppose I need to learn a bit about shutter speed, and iso and whatnots - but I was sort of wondering what I should practice taking picture of to learn about this stuff?
I'm thankful for any and all ideas or suggestions. :)
12/30/2006 06:16:28 AM · #2

Try entering challenges...you soon learn the ropes both on here and on the camera and processing.
12/30/2006 06:17:32 AM · #3
i'm not much an advice dweller but all i can say is just turn the camera on and shoot everything ... after couple of days you will notice exactly what you wanted to know, and from this point on everything will be easier.

practice makes perfect. (who said that?)
12/30/2006 06:22:38 AM · #4
Agreed, I'm also still practicing, and still have to do a lot o practicing to get a decent score on a challenge.

I found that you get a lot of very good help by entering challenges. The comments are always very helpful, and even though sometimes it is a question of personal taste, you still learn a lot.

Have fun and welcome!
12/30/2006 07:10:54 AM · #5
Also remember a few things if you enter challenges here -

Firstly, that some of the photographers here are amazing, and produce national award-winning quality photographs, so do not be too surprised if you can't quite match them to start with.

Secondly, remember that the average score here is not a 10. The voters do not pander to people - this isn't myspace. If you submit a photo, be prepared for it to be judged. You may get scores of 3 or low 4 if your technicals are off, as they might be if you are learning - remember there is not much difference between 4 and 6 and a 6 here is a damn good score!

Then thirdly, remember to ignore all that and have fun!
12/30/2006 09:28:11 AM · #6
Firstly know your camera and what it can do. Know how to change the settings without fumbling too much. If you see something you like, you'll want to concentrate on the subject, and not how to change the shutter speed. I recommend you stick to program mode for now and start learning about f/stops etc, and once you are comfortable with the technicalities of exposure, try manual exposure then.

For subject matter, shoot what you like. If you like flowers, take photos of flowers. If you like mountains, shoot mountains. What you need to do is to practice and take a million photos and only then will you begin to see what your style is and how you can get better. Do not try to force yourself to develop a style or blindly copy someone's work. It'll come to you over time.

Post your photos here and get criticism. Just like the real world, some people here have no idea what photography is, so you'll get a few lame comments now and then. Ignore them and learn from constructive criticism.

And... have fun ;-)

Edit : There are a lot of amazing people here. You can check out their portfolios for inspiration.

Message edited by author 2006-12-30 09:29:10.
12/30/2006 11:22:21 AM · #7
Welcome Nell! It's fun to see more schandihoovians here!

Practise makes perfect. Keep shooting anything that facinates you, and you will learn something everyday.

As Ignite said, have phun!

Cheers!

12/30/2006 11:30:19 AM · #8
thanks for all the welcomes. :)

I've added you to my favourites, terje, you've got some beautiful shots. I live in the middle of the country, without water or mountains or anything interesting to photograph (nature-wise anyway). :)

I'll try my best to find stuff to photograph - even though the gloomy, wet and windy weather isn't helping inspiration. :)

[edit: oh and now I've payed for membership and all. :D what have I gotten myself in to?]

Message edited by author 2006-12-30 11:39:47.
12/30/2006 11:33:10 AM · #9
I suggest just start shooting anything and eveyrthing that you come accross.

Check the settings of the camera play with them, make notes and Have Fun.


12/30/2006 11:47:41 AM · #10
Originally posted by nell:

*hem hem*

my first forum post? :o

anyway, my question is probably a lot simpler than the answer. :) I got a Canon Ixux 65 for christmas, and I'd like to try my hand at photography worthy of dpc... but I don't really know where to start. I suppose I need to learn a bit about shutter speed, and iso and whatnots - but I was sort of wondering what I should practice taking picture of to learn about this stuff?
I'm thankful for any and all ideas or suggestions. :)


Hello and welcome,
Looks like you have started.
444431.jpg
There are some really awesome kids photos' here.
Take a look around and practic on your nephew every chance you get.

Have fun and enjoy...
12/30/2006 12:17:42 PM · #11
If you don't have the "scenic vistas", notice the little things. Watch for things that could be still life compositions, close-up, macro. Pay attention to your lighting and backgrounds---the most simple, unlikely things can end up as excellent subjects in the right context. Be aware of composition and try shooting the same thing from different angles.
12/30/2006 12:18:33 PM · #12
Try reading this tutorial...

A Beginner's Guide to Simple Photography Concepts: ISO, Aperture, and Shutter Speed
By redsunphotography
12/30/2006 12:27:45 PM · #13
Originally posted by nell:

*hem hem*

my first forum post? :o

anyway, my question is probably a lot simpler than the answer. :) I got a Canon Ixux 65 for christmas, and I'd like to try my hand at photography worthy of dpc... but I don't really know where to start. I suppose I need to learn a bit about shutter speed, and iso and whatnots - but I was sort of wondering what I should practice taking picture of to learn about this stuff?
I'm thankful for any and all ideas or suggestions. :)


Well, your camera doesn't have manual settings so you're a bit confined in the shutterspeed/aperture area (which isn't to say that the camera can't take great photos). My first recommendation would be to read your camera's manual so that you know what it's capable of. There are a bunch of different modes, though and you can practice using those and see which gets you the best results. You can work on framing your shots and composing well. Some people find it helpful to find shots they like and try to emulate them. I would say just practice lots!
12/30/2006 12:29:56 PM · #14
Welcome aboard the looniest site on the net :-) And here's to a new, enjoyable hobby.

Mys suggestion. Start shooting for challenges. Shoot as many shots as it takes to get something you like and SUBMIT the image. If it doesn't score well, as for comments after voting about what you could have done better.

Don't be put off by negative comments. You might find them helpful, if you don't get offended by them.

Most of all, HAVE FUN!
12/30/2006 01:41:33 PM · #15
Originally posted by nell:


[edit: oh and now I've payed for membership and all. :D what have I gotten myself in to?]


Noooo!! its too late... shes gotten a membership.. Welcome to the addiction that is DPC. You'll find the urge to click update on your challenge scores every 3-7 minutes, you must refrain from doing so or you'll go crazy. Unfortunatly there is no cure for this DPCitis now that you've got a membership, all you can do now is keep it under control, you can manage the craveings by taking 2 pictures 4 times a day. lol Welcome to DPC, you'll love it here ;)

Message edited by author 2006-12-30 13:41:51.
12/30/2006 01:43:48 PM · #16
Originally posted by fotomann_forever:

Welcome aboard the looniest site on the net :-) And here's to a new, enjoyable hobby.

Mys suggestion. Start shooting for challenges. Shoot as many shots as it takes to get something you like and SUBMIT the image. If it doesn't score well, as for comments after voting about what you could have done better.

Don't be put off by negative comments. You might find them helpful, if you don't get offended by them.

Most of all, HAVE FUN!


yes.. shoot shoot shoot! I didn't understand all the mumbo-jumbo bout shutterspeed and stuff for about 2-3 weeks after i got my camera, just take a crapload of pictures, you'll notice that they might be too dark or too light, just adjust the settings accordingly. Ask alot of questions here too, thats how i figured things out. Good luck and gods speed... lol

edit to add: Forgot to say that i also learned bout ss and aperture and stuff via the AV and TV mode, where you set the shutterspeed (TV) and it will pick the best aperture, and (AV mode) where you set the aperture and it pickes the best shutterspeed. I dont know if your camera has those settings, they might be called something else, i dunno lol.

Message edited by author 2006-12-30 13:48:43.
12/30/2006 02:14:00 PM · #17
Aside from entering official challenges, try some of the side challenge threads like any of the "30 day..." ones - there is no pressure, lots of feedback, fast paced, more interactive with other members and you will definitely learn a lot.

Welcome to DPC! Looking forward to seeing your portfolio grow! :)
12/30/2006 03:02:34 PM · #18
If you participate, you'll learn by ~exposure~ :o) (Sorry!) I have found DPC useful in helping me learn how to look at a photo.

Just what should a technically good photograph look like? For example, what are blown highlights... how much contrast is too much... when is blurriness acceptable... etc. etc.

Then aside from the technicals, there is the matter of composition and taste, much more subjective, of course. Even in matters of personal preference, however, I find that I learn by reading comments and discussion about photo styles that I might not necessarily want to shoot.

Lastly (and this is the fun part) there is the little matter of trying to mimic and replicate the techniques you have picked up from being a member here. Not as easy as it seems at first for some of us! but well worth the journey none the less. So get in there, start voting on challenges, don't be shy about commenting on any photos that might strike your fancy for better or for worse, and take the next step of entering a challenge or two. And welcome aboard!

_Ray
12/30/2006 03:35:42 PM · #19
.

What I always like to say, "The more photos you take, the better you get."

Get out there and start shooting, Nell! :-D

You don't have to enter challenges, so whenever you come across a great photo that you've taken, try shoehorning er...submitting to a challenge. ;-)

Message edited by author 2006-12-30 15:37:30.
01/01/2007 07:18:13 PM · #20
*revives old thread*

thanks again for advice. I'm trying my hardest to both find things to shoot, and not to think too hard about it at the same time. :)
I think I have an idea for one of the challenges that's open now - we'll see if I can pull it off. :)

anyway, I've got three uploads now that are genuine attempts at proper photography... any comments (on both photography and post-editing - of which I have done none) would be greatly appreciated. :)
01/01/2007 07:27:53 PM · #21
Another hint.... rather than just asking for feedback in general, pick one of the photos and link to it in a thread - you are more likely to get a critique that way.

Also: we're a nosy bunch and like to see the technical details filled in (like aperture, shutterspeed, ISO and whatever else you can give us). It is often easier to give intelligent answers and advice when we know those.
01/01/2007 07:31:08 PM · #22
Originally posted by Beetle:

Another hint.... rather than just asking for feedback in general, pick one of the photos and link to it in a thread - you are more likely to get a critique that way.

Also: we're a nosy bunch and like to see the technical details filled in (like aperture, shutterspeed, ISO and whatever else you can give us). It is often easier to give intelligent answers and advice when we know those.


I haven't got the hang of these forums yet... But here are the thumbs:
445926.jpg 445924.jpg 445928.jpg

and I haven't got any software yet that will tell me aperture (what is that anyway?) and things... the ones in the FAQ weren't that helpful. I'll try to get a hold of it in the future, though. :)

Message edited by author 2007-01-01 19:31:44.
01/01/2007 07:42:16 PM · #23
Nell, aperture etc are the very basics of photography.

I strongly suggest you do some websurfing. There are countless sites that will help you grasp the basics. You will find that useful, regardless of what camera you use.

Once you understand the basic principles, it will be much easier to ask specific questions that get you useful answers.
01/01/2007 07:46:46 PM · #24
re software: in time, you WILL want software for postprocessing, but don't rush into that yet. You need to learn the basics first, it will help you make the decision that is right for YOU.

For starters, download the free windows viewer, it shows the basic EXIF (your camera settings).

You will want to study those - not just to satisfy OUR curiosity, but because you can learn so much from them.
01/01/2007 10:28:33 PM · #25
You should check out This tutorial it helped me quite a bit, the pictures help you understand what everything does
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