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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> preparing photos to print - crop or resize?
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12/11/2006 10:32:01 PM · #1
just curious if i should be cropping to the aspect ratio i want to print, or resizing/resampling the image to the correct size? It seems that if I crop to 11x14, the DPI stays fixed at 300, but if i resize to 11x14 the DPI goes up. Is this because when I crop I'm throwing away those extra pixels?
12/11/2006 11:05:41 PM · #2
Originally posted by PSUlion01:

Is this because when I crop I'm throwing away those extra pixels?

Yup, crop = throwing away pixels
12/29/2006 03:33:43 PM · #3
How to crop and resize without losing quality?
12/29/2006 03:41:32 PM · #4
Never, never, never resize if you're going to print. At least it doesn't work for me. Crop to the ratio you want.
12/29/2006 03:47:50 PM · #5
Thanks! I didn't know that... I have been resizing :(

Jojo
12/29/2006 04:01:23 PM · #6
Originally posted by TCGuru:

Thanks! I didn't know that... I have been resizing :(

Jojo


Well, it's kind of a complicated thing, but resizing ALSO throws away dots.

You want as MANY dots (pixels) as you can for printing, but between 150 dpi and 250 dpi is generally acceptable. So, if you wanna print an 8 x 10, the image should be something between 1200x1500 and 2000x2500 as far as "image size". BUT! If you have more, don't throw it away by resizing.

Crop to proper aspect ratio, leaving the most pixels possible. Then print.

Make any sense??? The "DPI" listed in the resize settings really is just a reference. You're not actually changing the quality of the picture, it's just doing the math for you.
12/29/2006 04:24:37 PM · #7
Originally posted by nards656:

Crop to proper aspect ratio, leaving the most pixels possible. Then print.

Make any sense??? The "DPI" listed in the resize settings really is just a reference. You're not actually changing the quality of the picture, it's just doing the math for you.

My variation is to crop to whatever shape I want, then add Canvas to make it a standard print size/aspect ratio.

If you don't include a border, a tiny bit of your image around the edges will be lost in the printing process -- the image is enlarged slightly to make sure it bleeds over the edge of the paper. I'd rather trim or mat the border area if necessary.

The key to making resizing more sensible is to turn off the "Resample" option (in Photoshop) -- when you set it to a certain size (e.g. 10 inches) the resolution will change to compensate -- as long as the DPI displayed there is more than 150 DPI you should be OK, but don't worry if it is 268 or 324 or any other higher number; that will make no practical difference.
12/29/2006 06:33:40 PM · #8
Originally posted by nards656:


Well, it's kind of a complicated thing, but resizing ALSO throws away dots.

You want as MANY dots (pixels) as you can for printing, but between 150 dpi and 250 dpi is generally acceptable. So, if you wanna print an 8 x 10, the image should be something between 1200x1500 and 2000x2500 as far as "image size". BUT! If you have more, don't throw it away by resizing.

Crop to proper aspect ratio, leaving the most pixels possible. Then print.

Make any sense??? The "DPI" listed in the resize settings really is just a reference. You're not actually changing the quality of the picture, it's just doing the math for you.


Yes, that makes perfect sense... *slapping self in forehead* I feel stupid LOL

I will remember about adding a border too... thanks General!

Jojo
12/29/2006 06:38:52 PM · #9
Check the print size table at the bottom of the page for more detailed information.
12/29/2006 06:44:21 PM · #10
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Check the print size table at the bottom of the page for more detailed information.


Great resource! Bookmarked it :D

Jojo
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