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08/13/2006 04:40:53 AM · #1
One of the things I like to do on the stock sites is to look at what the most commonly searched keywords are and come up with shots based on them. These probably make up about half of what I submit. I also like to shoot things that I find artistic in my eyes.

Anyway, based on keywords, I would like to get some shots at a golf course, maybe some weird angles or just a few nice wide angle shots. There are some courses around here that face a street, but I need to be closer.

So, not being from a golfing family..what do I need to do for this? Am I free to walk out onto a golf course to take pictures (not of people), or do I need to clear it with someone at the main building? I guess this also applies to other types of locations, but right now I'm primarily interested in golf courses.

Thanks,
Lisa
08/13/2006 05:06:26 AM · #2
Well, a golf course is private property, so you'll need to treat it as such. I'm not familiar with all the applicable laws, so I can't help you out too much there. But I think most courses probably get requests from time to time, so placing a call to the courses in question will likely lead you in the right direction. Don't be surprised however if some of these courses, especially if they are particularly nice courses, deny your request. Sometimes they have their own official photographer(s), and only make exceptions when it's a media request,
08/13/2006 07:32:52 AM · #3
I'll be heading to the golf course by by job when my new lens gets here, so I've tought about this too. Remember they CAN throw you off if they like. Just use some common sense and you shouldn't have a problem.

DON'T:
1. Walk across the greens or fairways.
2. Talk to the golfers unless they talk to you first.
3. Take close-ups of the golfers. I'd imagine more than a few of them work in 'sensitive' positions? But, thats a guess. They DO go there to 'get away from it all'.

DO's:
1. If you can, stay on the cart paths and move over when a cart comes by.
2. If a course worker comes by, smile, wave and say hi.
3. If they ask what your doing...just tell them, 'I'm just taking some pictures, will that be ok?'
4. If a golfer or worker yells or has a bad tone with you, just ask or say 'I'll leave if you like'.

Remember, (as heathen said) it is private property and technically they can have you arrested (at the extreme) or, at least, thrown off. But, if you're nice to them, they'll be nice to you.......usually.

'You can catch more flies with honey than vinegar'

Added: If yu want to play it safe, go to the golf course maintenance shop and speak to someone. How about offering them some of your shots in return? Might lead to something......eh?

Message edited by author 2006-08-13 07:36:15.
08/13/2006 07:44:58 AM · #4
Alternatively if you have some friends that golg, see if you can tag along with them on a round, they may make some good models also :)
08/13/2006 07:50:11 AM · #5
This is what I think I'll have to do. If it's bad etiquette to walk across the greens and fairways, I'll go with a golfer friend so I can.

I really have no interest in shooting the golfers, or at least shooting them where they'd be recognizable. I'm not all that comfortable yet with asking a total stranger to sign a model release.

Originally posted by Kaveran:

Alternatively if you have some friends that golg, see if you can tag along with them on a round, they may make some good models also :)
08/13/2006 08:05:11 AM · #6
I worked on golf courses for a number of years (yes, there is actually a college degree called Turf Science, a branch of horticulture, my major).

Most of the employees that you'll run into on the course probably won't care if you're taking pictures. I'd be surprised if the guys riding on mowers even give you a 2nd look. The people in the pro shop (administration types) might have something to say, but if you're out away from the main areas and shooting landscapes, you shouldn't have much problem. Most of the courses will have a Ranger, someone (generally an older guy) in a golf cart who's only job is to drive around the course and make sure the people are following the rules, playing quickly enough, etc.. This is the one person who you might run in to that would ask questions.

One other thing to consider, if you're going out during the 'magic hours'(just after sunrise or just before sunset), you won't run into many golfers. Early in the morning you'll find the grounds maintenance guys mowing the greens and getting the course ready for the day. Late in the evening you'll find a few golfers who don't mind searching for their ball in dim light. Weekends will be a LOT busier than during the week. As long as no one is on the course playing, it's ok to walk across the fairways or greens, just keep your eyes open as the balls can come out of nowhere (trust me, not fun to be hit).

If you've got other questions, feel free to ask.

Message edited by author 2006-08-13 09:02:50.
08/13/2006 08:38:15 AM · #7
I do about 90% of my shooting Mon-Wed since those are my days off from my regular day job. So, not shooting on the weekends is pretty easy. Thanks for the advice. I'll be shooting them sometime in the next couple days and I'll report back.

Thanks,
lisa
08/13/2006 11:14:15 AM · #8
Same problem here, different subject though. I'm from the midwest, major grain production area. I am aware that if you photograph someone's house for stock photography, it would be wise to get permission and a release signed. How do they look at photographing crops? When you zero in on the crop be it beans or corn, wheat or oats, one field looks like another. Attempting to locate an owner could be extremely difficult. Would a tight photo of a field need a release? As long as there aren't any identifying features, who would possibly be able to find that exact field again without asking the photographer?
Thanks-
Caitlyn
08/13/2006 11:23:23 AM · #9
Originally posted by Caitlyn:

Same problem here, different subject though. I'm from the midwest, major grain production area. I am aware that if you photograph someone's house for stock photography, it would be wise to get permission and a release signed. How do they look at photographing crops? When you zero in on the crop be it beans or corn, wheat or oats, one field looks like another. Attempting to locate an owner could be extremely difficult. Would a tight photo of a field need a release? As long as there aren't any identifying features, who would possibly be able to find that exact field again without asking the photographer?
Thanks-
Caitlyn


Crops aren't generally going to be a "recognizable location", and it's my understanding that property releases are only necessary if someone can definitively look at the photo and say, "Hey, that's MY field!" It would have to have some really unique feature to be distinguishable.
08/13/2006 11:45:42 AM · #10
2nd situation came up in a discussion with my husband who does heavy construction. If one wanted to photography a construction project (dams, water control, etc.) you are now looking at the owner of title, construction company and at least one operator. He claims that you should only need the contractor's release as they take "ownership" of the property until the job has been signed off and paid. Suggestions?
08/13/2006 12:00:11 PM · #11
Originally posted by Caitlyn:

2nd situation came up in a discussion with my husband who does heavy construction. If one wanted to photography a construction project (dams, water control, etc.) you are now looking at the owner of title, construction company and at least one operator. He claims that you should only need the contractor's release as they take "ownership" of the property until the job has been signed off and paid. Suggestions?


A P.S. to this post is that, in addition to those already mentioned, what about equipment? You have at least one if not more brand names on the equipment on site. Does each manufacturer also need to provide a release?

Maybe I'm making this too complicated???
08/13/2006 12:17:11 PM · #12
Originally posted by Caitlyn:

2nd situation came up in a discussion with my husband who does heavy construction. If one wanted to photography a construction project (dams, water control, etc.) you are now looking at the owner of title, construction company and at least one operator. He claims that you should only need the contractor's release as they take "ownership" of the property until the job has been signed off and paid. Suggestions?


That's simply not true. Photographing such things during construction is extremely sensitive. It has to be cleared at the highest (client) level. Common sense would tell you that having uncontrolled photographs floating around of major projects like dams with their innards/underpinnings exposed is a serious no-no in the industry. We had to jump through numerous hoops to get site access for major engineering projects back in the day, and I can only assume it's far worse now with heightened security awareness.

R.
08/13/2006 12:34:27 PM · #13
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by Caitlyn:

2nd situation came up in a discussion with my husband who does heavy construction. If one wanted to photography a construction project (dams, water control, etc.) you are now looking at the owner of title, construction company and at least one operator. He claims that you should only need the contractor's release as they take "ownership" of the property until the job has been signed off and paid. Suggestions?


That's simply not true. Photographing such things during construction is extremely sensitive. It has to be cleared at the highest (client) level. Common sense would tell you that having uncontrolled photographs floating around of major projects like dams with their innards/underpinnings exposed is a serious no-no in the industry. We had to jump through numerous hoops to get site access for major engineering projects back in the day, and I can only assume it's far worse now with heightened security awareness.

R.


Thanks for the reply. My mistake here as I wasn't very clear on what I was asking. The types of water control that I'm refering to aren't anything a terrorist would bother with. 99% of the population would look at one and never recognize that it is a dam, they look more like a "bump" in the dirt. They are generally used in areas where the soil has a tendancy to hold water and plowing ability is about once every 7 years in a drought. They come in and dredge out areas and build up mounds to help in water retention and are used to attract wild life and filter water runoff before it moves into rivers and streams. These types of construction are frequently photographed around here with no more than "I know the contractor" as permission. My quandry is that I worked for a newspaper/shopper for 5 years making ads. Over the years I have developed a knowledge of areas where artwork/photographs are in short supply. Rather than limit my work to "journalist" endeavors I would like to have these available for advertisements too. Back to my original question then is just how many releases are required in a situation like this?
Owner, contractor, operator, equipment manufacturers, possibly even subcontractors and government agencies (DNR)?

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