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DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> Chess...Game or sport? which is the difference?
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Showing posts 51 - 75 of 99, (reverse)
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09/15/2003 01:30:44 PM · #51
Originally posted by jonpink:


So Glimpses, your telling me that chess is physical? I can't belive it can make someone out-of-breath, if so they probably need a Doc. Chess is played sitting down, and all you move is your arm.

Correct me if I am wrong.


Well.. yes. That was the point I was trying to explain but, as I tried to mention in my previous post, you cannot experience it if you do not try it.

Chess performances at competitive level are very precisely regulated on timing and matches can last hours of deep thinking.

I am sure that whoever, genius or not, had tried to use its brain for real and for such a long session can feel way more tired than a fast runner after a 100 mt. challenge.
09/15/2003 01:32:12 PM · #52
i would argue the more physically involved you are in chess, the more likely you are to blow the game. it's pure intellect and it rewards detachment and the ability to think moves ahead .. this might be why the machine now kicks Kasparov's ass. In an interview, he said his own emotional and physical reactions are his biggest enemy and obstacle.

Originally posted by myqyl:

Originally posted by jonpink:

So Glimpses, your telling me that chess is physical? I can't belive it can make someone out-of-breath, if so they probably need a Doc. Chess is played sitting down, and all you move is your arm.

Correct me if I am wrong.


Something tells me you've never played a serious round of chess.

Correct me if I am wrong. :)
09/15/2003 01:41:04 PM · #53
Originally posted by magnetic9999:

i would argue the more physically involved you are in chess, the more likely you are to blow the game. it's pure intellect and it rewards detachment and the ability to think moves ahead .. this might be why the machine now kicks Kasparov's ass. In an interview, he said his own emotional and physical reactions are his biggest enemy and obstacle.


Do not get confused here. There is a psychology of the game that, of course, does not influence the machine.
Another thing is to say that the brain is not part of the body and then you cannot get tired because of thinking a lot... that is a work and it possibly is the hardest one... looking at how many people run away from it.
09/15/2003 01:54:13 PM · #54
Originally posted by glimpses:

Originally posted by EddyG:

Originally posted by magnetic9999:

if it doesn't have a special outfit or clothing for it, it's not a sport.

Mag, this is a brilliant observation. Brav-o!

Who was the official provider for the very first Olympic Games few thousands year ago?

Everything I've ever read suggests that the original Olympic events were performed nude. (Their version of "leveling the playing field," I suppose.) Somehow, I don't think "special equipment" would be of much use then ....

Message edited by author 2003-09-15 13:55:37.
09/15/2003 02:04:22 PM · #55
no, I haven't played chess in any kind of competition so i will shut up now ;)

Is reading / replying on this forum a sport? ;)




09/15/2003 02:05:34 PM · #56
well if i can't wear my cup, then i'm taking my ball and going home !

(no pun intended -- or was it? ; ) ))


Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by glimpses:

Originally posted by EddyG:

Originally posted by magnetic9999:

if it doesn't have a special outfit or clothing for it, it's not a sport.

Mag, this is a brilliant observation. Brav-o!

Who was the official provider for the very first Olympic Games few thousands year ago?

Everything I've ever read suggests that the original Olympic events were performed nude. (Their version of "leveling the playing field," I suppose.) Somehow, I don't think "special equipment" would be of much use then ....
09/15/2003 02:09:24 PM · #57
I can guarantee that professional track and field would draw higher TV ratings if the participants got rid of the Lycra/Spandex Power Ranger outfits and went "back to basics."
09/15/2003 02:28:54 PM · #58
could ad a whole new meaning to being a Long Jumper.

09/15/2003 02:31:48 PM · #59
Originally posted by PaulMdx:

Originally posted by joannadiva:

Action can mean inaction

here's an example from 3rd grade english

Joanna is sitting at her computer

Subject = Joanna

Nown/ action word = sitting

You're thinking of verbs there, Joanna. Right idea though.


it was late.... I was cranky.... thanks!
09/15/2003 02:41:18 PM · #60
chess is as much as a sport as under water basket weaving....

chess is a very competive game which I dont have the patience for, heck I cant even win at checkers

James
09/15/2003 02:50:32 PM · #61
Originally posted by jonpink:

no, I haven't played chess in any kind of competition so i will shut up now ;)

Is reading / replying on this forum a sport? ;)


Yes, it is when the spirit is as good as yours.
09/15/2003 02:53:58 PM · #62
Originally posted by jonpink:

could ad a whole new meaning to being a Long Jumper.

I was looking forward to the relay races myself.
09/15/2003 02:57:41 PM · #63
Originally posted by Anachronite:

if you can smoke and drink while doing it, it's not a sport.. :o)


That rules out most of the best softball and volleyball matches I've ever been in.
09/15/2003 03:00:57 PM · #64
Originally posted by kostia:

Originally posted by Anachronite:

if you can smoke and drink while doing it, it's not a sport.. :o)


That rules out most of the best softball and volleyball matches I've ever been in.

When I was in college (the first time), the rugby club's slogan was "One keg before the game, one keg during the game, one keg after the game." This was before the University of Florida marketed Gatorade ....
09/15/2003 03:35:40 PM · #65
Excuse the nitpicks coming up..

I played chess competitively in grade school, and while it is a very involved and tiring activity, both mentally and physically, I wouldn't really consider it a sport myself. I run cross country and track at a national level and can see the differences fairly plainly. This, however, does not make chess a lesser game. Somehow calling something a sport legitimises it? Not sure how this works. There are all sorts of activities, jobs etc. that are mentally and physically taxing that aren't considered sports, but are equally as legit and/or important and require just as much physical skill. Ballet comes to mind...

The way I see it, there's an element of tradition surrounding what is defined as a sport, in that it is more easily defined if it has a culture built up around it. What's the real difference, for example, between competitive ballroom dancing and figure skating? Ice. That's about it. Yet, most people would accept figure skating as a sport and scoff at ballroom dancing.

To me, sport is competition with a physical component. By physical, I don't mean motor skills required to pick up and put down a chess piece. As you could really speak your moves in chess, it's not really a sport in my mind. It's still a beautiful, complex and highly competitive game. Does it really matter what we label it, anyways?

Message edited by author 2003-09-15 15:37:01.
09/15/2003 03:57:43 PM · #66
Originally posted by jimmythefish:

To me, sport is competition with a physical component.


Well.. what I find quite scary following this logic is that the brain is not considered a physical component and the reason why I find it scary it is because it could be a striking example of how a culture can render some obvious concepts invisible.
09/15/2003 04:01:40 PM · #67
The brain is most indeed physical. What I'm saying is that brain activity and normal everyday body movement is not considered 'physical activity' in the same way that running, jumping, skating, skiing, dancing etc. are. This is the practical distinction.

Originally posted by glimpses:



Well.. what I find quite scary following this logic is that the brain is not considered a physical component and the reason why I find it scary it is because it could be a striking example of how a culture can render some obvious concepts invisible.
09/15/2003 04:33:15 PM · #68
Originally posted by jimmythefish:

The brain is most indeed physical. What I'm saying is that brain activity and normal everyday body movement is not considered 'physical activity' in the same way that running, jumping, skating, skiing, dancing etc. are. This is the practical distinction.


I see the point and maybe the whole issue could then be reduced to introducing the concept of "physical sport" and "mental sport", assuming that sport is, after all, a competitive activity (originally) finalized to have fun.

edited to correct the quote tag.

Message edited by author 2003-09-15 16:34:54.
09/15/2003 04:37:26 PM · #69
DPchallenge a sport?Hmmmmmmm.
09/15/2003 04:37:47 PM · #70
Where's the physical aspect of a computer playing chess? Does a human player with a computer opponent have an advantage due to being able to move his or her pieces with his or her own hands? Of course not. Are people who play chess on paper, or via mail or email, playing a physical sport? Of course not. It's a game.

But for this challenge I'm using the definition that makes a sport something competitive, with or without an opponent, not necessarily something physical. One defintion of "sport" is simply "leisure" or "fun," and anything from making card castles to playing pencil-and-paper Battleship is a competitive leisure activity that fits that definition.
09/15/2003 04:52:37 PM · #71
Originally posted by glimpses:


I see the point and maybe the whole issue could then be reduced to introducing the concept of "physical sport" and "mental sport", assuming that sport is, after all, a competitive activity (originally) finalized to have fun.

edited to correct the quote tag.


But the real point is, that sport already means 'physical activity' hence this long, drawn out thread.
09/15/2003 05:14:10 PM · #72
Originally posted by Gordon:

Originally posted by glimpses:


I see the point and maybe the whole issue could then be reduced to introducing the concept of "physical sport" and "mental sport", assuming that sport is, after all, a competitive activity (originally) finalized to have fun.

edited to correct the quote tag.


But the real point is, that sport already means 'physical activity' hence this long, drawn out thread.


Not necessarily...

I run "Oxford Talking Dictionary" on sport and I got the following, ordered, definitions:

1 Diversion, entertainment, fun; an activity providing this, a pastime
2 A matter providing amusement or entertainment; a joke
3 An activity involving physical exertion and skill, esp. one in which an individual competes against another or others to achieve the best performance.
4 ...............

The "physical" aspect came into play only at the third definition. Eventually, it is about what definition of sport we pick up.
09/15/2003 05:41:32 PM · #73
Originally posted by C-Fox:

If 3 people out of 79 thought it counted, to me that is a significant number implying a culture standard of understanding. Just wish I had thought of it myself.


it's actually more an implication of a standard of misunderstanding - just as the 15 spider shots in an insect challenge were

it is indicative of the typical lowering of standards until even the most obtuse entry can be "quantified" as mainstream

hell -if your children can't speak english, just take whatever gibberish they DO speak and call it a new language, say 'ebonics'

we can start our own dictionary - and we'll just add whatever entries it takes to make sure our photos "meet the challenge"

i now faithfully submit the 1st entry in the DPC dictionary ... "meet the challenge" = my photo, no matter what.
09/15/2003 06:08:40 PM · #74
Originally posted by jimmythefish:

...What's the real difference, for example, between competitive ballroom dancing and figure skating? Ice...

Not much, and if you ever watch the world ballroom dancing championships on PBS you'd probably consider it a sport too.

I think an essential difference between an idle diversion and a sport is the element of competition, having a winner and loser(s). Ballet doesn't include this element (except in auditions). And what's the difference between ballet and gymnastics -- talc?

Doing a crossword (much as I love them) is not a sport, unless you are in a real-time competition with others. Surviving a chess, pool, golf, or billiards tournament is (to me) a sporting accomplishment.

Message edited by author 2003-09-15 18:11:40.
09/15/2003 06:10:32 PM · #75
And we haven't even gotten to the one I wanted to use, the biological definition of a plant or animal with a non-fatal mutation.
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