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DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> What's your Meyers-Briggs profile and...
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07/26/2006 08:55:10 AM · #76
INFJ

And strangely, even though we make up about 2% of the world, I'm the 3rd one of us listed here!
07/26/2006 08:56:19 AM · #77
INFP (I:11% F:75% F:38% P:56%)
07/26/2006 09:04:27 AM · #78
Originally posted by kteach:

INFJ

And strangely, even though we make up about 2% of the world, I'm the 3rd one of us listed here!


Welcome to the club.
07/26/2006 09:39:22 AM · #79
Originally posted by Tuckersmom:

Originally posted by mk:

I'm an ISTJ. It means I like to photograph my cats.


I'm an ISTJ too - looks like just us and Fred Mertz (a la "I Love Lucy") so far. Oh and I like to photograph my dog


I'm also an ISTJ. I don't really feel like Fred Mertz most of the time, but I can see how I could be compared... :) I like to photograph my dogs, too.
07/26/2006 09:51:46 AM · #80
To respond to LegalBeagle's question...
I have seen the MBTI used best as a tool to help people get over the idea that everyone else should be just like them. To look at your example of someone who is disorganized - some folks who prize organization highly might think that trait reprehensible and generalize that such a person is bad at everything, rather than seeing it as one trait in context. Where organization is called for it would certainly be a weakness, but in another context that spontaneity might be a valuable strength. Another example would be those who are more detail-oriented (Sensing) vs. the big-picture thinkers (iNtuition). N's might call S's "bean-counters" while S's talk about the N's as "having their heads in a cloud". Could any organization really get along effectively without both types? It's all about recognizing and valueing those differences.

Another use I've seen described (maybe it's even the start) is to help writers develop more 3-dimensional characters.

Is any of my Healer/Idealist showing?

Linda
07/26/2006 10:08:31 AM · #81
Originally posted by kteach:

INFJ

And strangely, even though we make up about 2% of the world, I'm the 3rd one of us listed here!

2% of the population, but 30% of photographers. ;)
07/26/2006 10:08:54 AM · #82
ISFP for me....the description fits me well
07/26/2006 10:16:12 AM · #83
Originally posted by legalbeagle:

Originally posted by amber:

Don't some employers use it for recruiting purposes?


The reason I was given for doing it was that when setting up a team, it would be helpful to know who would be best at what, and who would work well together. So perhaps some people do use it for choosing who to employ (scary though that is, and potentially of questionable legality).

However, why we should need a test to determine, say, whether or not to give organisational tasks to someone who is disorganised, or to determine who will get on with whom, when they can talk for 5 minutes and you can find out the real answer, is beyond me.

It also assumes that people are static, unable to adapt, or that they will not work to overcome their shortcomings. It seems to me to be the lazy way out: one is diagnosed as, say, disorganised, and therefore always has the excuse without ever having to try and remedy the situation if it is required.

I would still be interested to know if anyone has ever managed to use the test results, or whether their test results have been used for anything.


I agree that this test could be dangerous in that someone might decide not to try to overcome their shortcomings or use it as an excuse to not be organized, etc. The best I ever heard this explained, however was at a conference where the moderator was very clear that this was a tool to explain your personality not an excuse to not try and overcome a disorganization problem. In fact, he was very clear that just because a "P" wasn't naturally organized, they can very well adapt and learn how to adjust in the world (the same goes for other types).

He was saying the most successful people were the ones that used the test to identify strengths and weaknesses in themselves and overcome the weaknesses and enhance the strengths. It was also useful in a workplace to help understand why your co-workers behaved a certain way or responded to situations sometimes. He also did not advocate that someone use this test for hiring practices. He did however recommend that all new hires take the test. He claimed it made for better harmony in the workplace because you didn't expect the "P" to have organization come as easily for them as it might for the "J"'s.

(I just chose disorganization and P's/J's because that is one of my biggest flaws as a "P"--I have the biggest mental block against organization).

I hope that makes sense. Although this test could be used to pigeonhole, and do so for those people who don't want to take the time to get to know someone, for those who really understand the test I think it gives them a common ground to get to know each other and build a foundation from there.

Eric
07/26/2006 10:23:20 AM · #84
Originally posted by lwiley212:

I have seen the MBTI used best as a tool to help people get over the idea that everyone else should be just like them.


That is an interesting reason I had not thought of - thanks! [edit: and to Eric too, for expanding on the point]

I still think that its reductionism is moderately objectionable, and pigeonholing people in this manner (like describing people by their star signs) is misguided, and so using it for more intrusive purposes (such as profiling on recruitment) is highly objectionable. But as a process for helping people think about how and why people are different, there is a potentially good objective (the ends possibly justifying the means).

Message edited by author 2006-07-26 10:26:31.
07/26/2006 10:35:23 AM · #85
what a dumb test

INTJ (11,38,50,56)

:)
07/26/2006 10:56:23 AM · #86
Your Type is
INTJ
Introverted Intuitive Thinking Judging
Strength of the preferences %
44 25 1 67

INTJ type description by D.Keirsey
INTJ type description by J. Butt and M.M. Heiss

Qualitative analysis of your type formula

You are:
moderately expressed introvert

moderately expressed intuitive personality

slightly expressed thinking personality

distinctively expressed judging personality
=====
Well at least I am good at voting :-)
07/26/2006 11:01:15 AM · #87
INTJ here
07/26/2006 11:02:59 AM · #88
So
7 ISTJ
4 ESTJ
5 INTP
4 INFP
2 ESTP
4 ISFP
4 INFJ
8 INTJ
2 ENFP
2 ENFJ
3 ISTP
1 ISFJ
2 ENTP
1 ENTJ
2 ESFP
1 INFJ/P
1 ISTJ/INTJ
1 INTP/T/F/ P/J
1 ROLF

And a Partridge in a pear tree:)

Message edited by author 2006-07-26 12:08:06.
07/26/2006 11:24:46 AM · #89
To address the concern that it pigeon holes people into static categories, and whether or not people can change . ..

I took the MBTI for the first time 17 or 18 years ago. The most recent test was about 2 years ago. The letters did not change. The numbers, did, slightly, but the basic personality "type" did not.

And I have changed ALOT in the past 18 years.
07/26/2006 11:25:39 AM · #90
Originally posted by amber:

So
1 ROLF

I hear that this type is fun to have at parties, but at work they never get ANYTHING done...
07/26/2006 11:27:56 AM · #91
Originally posted by Rikki:

INTPs make for great architects.

You thinking of Howard Roark?

(another INTP here)
07/26/2006 11:30:10 AM · #92
Originally posted by _eug:

Originally posted by amber:

So
1 ROLF

I hear that this type is fun to have at parties


Yea but not so fun to have at village fetes;)

Message edited by author 2006-07-26 11:33:06.
07/26/2006 11:44:13 AM · #93
Originally posted by Fromac:

Originally posted by kteach:

INFJ

And strangely, even though we make up about 2% of the world, I'm the 3rd one of us listed here!


Welcome to the club.


I'm a member of the INFJ club, too. And have been since the first time I took this inventory about 15 years ago. Although sometimes I will be a borderline INFP. I have elements of both, and find the description quite accurate.

In college, I introduced this to a bunch of my friends, and shocked them when I was able to "predict" with uncanny accuracy what they would come out as. I don't think it was so amazing - just part of what makes me an INFJ. :)

Liz
07/26/2006 11:46:45 AM · #94
added to the list;)
07/26/2006 11:47:33 AM · #95
Originally posted by amber:

added to the list;)

Which one were you Amber? I don't remember seeing listbuilder/score keeper :P
07/26/2006 11:50:27 AM · #96
I can't believe this thread is still alive.

I started it as a means to stay awake last night.
07/26/2006 11:55:12 AM · #97
Originally posted by cryingdragon:

Originally posted by amber:

added to the list;)

Which one were you Amber? I don't remember seeing listbuilder/score keeper :P


LOL:) INFP - but I love studying info and trying to find the hidden patterns or meaning in things...anal retentive, I think Freud would say:)

07/26/2006 11:55:55 AM · #98
Originally posted by Fromac:

I can't believe this thread is still alive.

I started it as a means to stay awake last night.


Didn't work then!:)
07/26/2006 12:03:13 PM · #99
Originally posted by legalbeagle:

Originally posted by lwiley212:

I have seen the MBTI used best as a tool to help people get over the idea that everyone else should be just like them.


That is an interesting reason I had not thought of - thanks! [edit: and to Eric too, for expanding on the point]

I still think that its reductionism is moderately objectionable, and pigeonholing people in this manner (like describing people by their star signs) is misguided, and so using it for more intrusive purposes (such as profiling on recruitment) is highly objectionable. But as a process for helping people think about how and why people are different, there is a potentially good objective (the ends possibly justifying the means).


Pigeonholing? Only if you let yourself be pigeonholed! Am I just like every other INFP on the planet? I highly doubt it!! There is room for all kinds of variability in the model - the degree you prefer/express each "letter" just for starters. Then you get into the context thing and it throws another level of variability into it. Does my high N mean that I'm never good with details? No! There are times when I am all about the details. However, if I could team up with someone who loved the details and appreciated my big-picture thinking - that would be bliss!

Reductionism? Well, yeah, but isn't that often done to help facilitate learning? Or simply to help us make sense of our world and all the information that is coming at us by the second? I've seen another model where leadership styles are categorized as Lion, Owl, St. Bernard, and Hub (combo of all 3). Simplistic for sure, but can still help to make the point. The MBTI's 16 types are incredibly complex by comparison! So I'd say it's not intrinsically good/bad or right/wrong. How we use it, though, is where usefulness or potential problems come in. Anytime we judge an individual by the group "norm" (i.e. stereotyping) we are likely to run into trouble.

Again, I think that how the tool is used or misused would color my opinion on the hiring issue. How is it different than the Gallup leadership survey used in hiring executives? If the position you are hiring for needs someone with good organizing skills, why not use something like the MBTI - in addition to experience, credentials, etc. - to narrow the field?

Linda
07/26/2006 12:03:46 PM · #100
ISTJ - I would photograph my cats if I could catch them.
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