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06/08/2006 06:13:12 PM · #1
I've been offered a position to teach day camp youths photography. I am surly not a "teacher" but am supposed to put some sort of curriculum or format together- any ideas?

Thank you so very much for your time and help,
Le'lani

06/08/2006 07:00:18 PM · #2
(bump)
06/08/2006 07:08:34 PM · #3
Some of this will depend on how long a period you have each day and for how many days and also the age of the kids and the age ranges. You probably won't have time and/or they won't have a lot of interest in/attention span for learning much more than the very basics. While the technicals are important, you'll probably have more fun and more success focusing on the creative aspects. Is the camp in an area that's good for walks? Go for walks and focus on different ways to see things or how to spot the things you'd otherwise overlook. Do a scavenger hunt or pick a theme. Maybe make pinhole cameras. You could probably work in some information on f-stops and apertures, etc. along the way as well.

06/08/2006 07:22:37 PM · #4
Thank you very much for responding mk-

It would be 8am - 6pm, 5days a week and the ages will range from 10 - 14 y/o

lelani
06/08/2006 07:23:53 PM · #5
One class would be 8-6?
06/08/2006 07:35:28 PM · #6
yes
06/08/2006 07:38:20 PM · #7
Well in that case, ignore everything I said. :) The summer camp I counseled at only had 45 minute periods so you couldn't cover much. Sounds like you'll be able to do a whole lot of stuff. But man, good luck...that's a really long time to hold kids' attention to one subject.
06/08/2006 07:51:10 PM · #8
Wow, this is such a great idea to get more kids into photography! I woulda have jumped at the chance to get into something like this when i was a bit younger! Having someone to start me out with some simple techniques and guidance would have been amazing

Good Luck Lelani!

Message edited by author 2006-06-08 19:53:27.
06/08/2006 07:54:23 PM · #9
I'll be working in 3 different camps- I'd say we'll begin @ 8:30 or 9am around noon or 1pm lunch for an hour then I'd say 3-4 hours left including breaks- (this is just off the top of my head)
06/08/2006 07:57:30 PM · #10
Originally posted by Canadian_eh:

Wow, this is such a great idea to get more kids into photography! I woulda have jumped at the chance to get into something like this when i was a bit younger! Having someone to start me out with some simple techniques and guidance would have been amazing

Good Luck Lelani!


I agree, I'm very excited and will surely keep updates.
06/08/2006 08:06:41 PM · #11
Are you working in digital, and will you have access to editing capabilities at the camp, enough for everyone?

If so, you have several areas you could hit each day: composition/esthetics; technicals/exposure; post-processing

I'd probably discuss a type of project for the day in the morning, set up/go out and shoot before and after lunch, post-process in the afternoon, and make presentations/have discussions before dinner.

Maybe in addition to daily projects, have one on-going one to be finished by the end.
06/11/2006 11:33:43 AM · #12
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Are you working in digital, and will you have access to editing capabilities at the camp, enough for everyone?

If so, you have several areas you could hit each day: composition/esthetics; technicals/exposure; post-processing

I'd probably discuss a type of project for the day in the morning, set up/go out and shoot before and after lunch, post-process in the afternoon, and make presentations/have discussions before dinner.

Maybe in addition to daily projects, have one on-going one to be finished by the end.


-yes I will be working in digital and will have access to editing

Thank you so very much for these ideas I sincerely appreciate everyone's help.

I have put this list together, anything else I should add?

Equipment

Hardware:
Cameras 5 point and shoot, 2 slrs
Computers 25
Printers 5 regular, 1 photo printer
Card Readers 5

Software:
Photoshop
Neat Image
06/11/2006 11:56:26 AM · #13
With that kind of budget you should consider getting a projector, so you can all review the photos together. Also, a laser pointer to use with it. You'll probably at some point want a whiteboard/blackboard or easel with drawing pad. Access to a photocopier might be handy. How about graphics tablets for retouching work?

Did you say how many kids this is supposed to cover? If it's a lot, you might need more cameras, unless you're splitting them into smaller groups with different activities. You can't have them arguing over who gets to shoot while the photo-op slips away; I think they each need to be carrying a camera, even if that means they'll be of lesser quality/capability.
06/11/2006 12:53:53 PM · #14
Originally posted by GeneralE:

With that kind of budget you should consider getting a projector, so you can all review the photos together. Also, a laser pointer to use with it. You'll probably at some point want a whiteboard/blackboard or easel with drawing pad. Access to a photocopier might be handy. How about graphics tablets for retouching work?

Did you say how many kids this is supposed to cover? If it's a lot, you might need more cameras, unless you're splitting them into smaller groups with different activities. You can't have them arguing over who gets to shoot while the photo-op slips away; I think they each need to be carrying a camera, even if that means they'll be of lesser quality/capability.


I'll have 25 kids, I'm thinking of having 5 groups with 1 camera per group-
06/11/2006 12:56:03 PM · #15
Originally posted by lelani:

I'll have 25 kids, I'm thinking of having 5 groups with 1 camera per group-

I'm thinking that's trouble for anything but studio photography.

What kind of locations do you have available?
06/11/2006 01:44:03 PM · #16
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by lelani:

I'll have 25 kids, I'm thinking of having 5 groups with 1 camera per group-

I'm thinking that's trouble for anything but studio photography.


I dunno. It teaches the value of working as a group along with the skills of photography. That can't be bad.
06/11/2006 03:55:48 PM · #17
Originally posted by fotomann_forever:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by lelani:

I'll have 25 kids, I'm thinking of having 5 groups with 1 camera per group-

I'm thinking that's trouble for anything but studio photography.


I dunno. It teaches the value of working as a group along with the skills of photography. That can't be bad.

You are one of a group of five photographers sharing a camera and you come across any scene of impending activity -- say a heron about to strike a frog -- do you want everyone trying to capture the action, or holding a committee meeting to vote how gets to use the one camera? I just can't see sharing on a 5:1 basis for nature photography or photojournalism. I agree they could learn to cooperate/collaborate with set-up or studio shots, but it seems less likely to work effectively outdoors.

PS: Have you ever watched little kids playing soccer?

Message edited by author 2006-06-11 15:57:34.
06/11/2006 04:43:52 PM · #18
You can make it work with one camera for five kids. The way to do it is to give them assignments that don't take long to find & shoot and then person gets a turn with the camera while the others act as assistants. But it would be much better if you had more cameras. It would be really nice if every student had a camera but working in pairs is fine.

I'm concerned about the size of your group. Twenty-five is a lot of kids. Whenever I do a computer workshop I arrange for an assistant to circulate among the group fixing individual problems while I explain things from the front. For a group of 25, I would want two assistants.

--DanW
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