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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Image Stabilization???
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05/24/2006 02:55:21 PM · #1
I am thinking I am going to brave it and buy an SLR. I am going to force myself to learn. But I am not always going to be using a tripod and I have a shakey hand so I am looking for some sort of image stablization. So far I have found the Maxumm 5D and the new Pentax 100D are there any others with either vibration reduction systems or image stabilization and what is the difference between those two things? I am thinking maybe I should wait for the 10mp pentax. I read that post and it definitely intrigued me. Thanks!

Jamie
05/24/2006 02:59:39 PM · #2
Canon and an IS lens. :P
05/24/2006 03:01:36 PM · #3
For the sake of sounding stupid ... this is news to me. Like I said just learning here...obviously. So you can buy lenses that offer this feature for a camera that doesn't have the feature?

Jamie
05/24/2006 03:01:37 PM · #4
May be you should wait till the photokina when the Sony alpha comes out.
That is also supposed to have image stabilization.
imho image stabilization in camera will not be very effective while using
long tele lenses, but vibration reduction (VR nikon, IS canon, OS sigma) will be effective in that case.
05/24/2006 03:04:47 PM · #5
Both Pentax and Konica-Minolta offer camera that have anti-shake systems built right into their cameras, so the lens doesn't matter. Canon and Nikon offer Image Stabilization and Vibration Reduction. All do the same thing but the diffrence with Pentax and KM is that their systems are in camers and move the sensor to correct for shake. IS ans VR lenses are expensive but worth the extra money. I have never tried the KM system and the K100D from Pentax is way to new. Hope this helps.
05/24/2006 03:04:52 PM · #6
Yes Jamie
You can buy lenses with the feature for normal cameras
Nikon has VR lenses
Canon has IS lenses
and Sigma uptil now have one lens with OS (usable on both canon and nikon mounts)
05/24/2006 03:07:35 PM · #7
Thanks for all that info There are just so many choices out there and I am so darn indecisive to begin with. I will definitely start reasearching those lenses.

Jamie
05/24/2006 03:08:38 PM · #8
Just starting out myself (will have my d50 etc in a week or so), i found the VR lenses rather cost prohibitive for a beginner. It might be worth it to learn first (and save) and get a monopod for walking around.
I've used one leg of a tripod as a monopod at the zoo and for walking and found that it's seriously decreased shake for me. It's convenient and quick to put away too to keep moving.

The IS/VR etc certainly would be preferable, but frankly unless I actually start making some money at it, it won't be worth it. IMHO that is.
05/24/2006 03:17:12 PM · #9
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05/24/2006 03:24:26 PM · #10
HI Jamie
Since you are about to go slr I'll tell what I did
Only thing to consider is a good lens system to go with.
And I think canon and nikon have the biggest collection of them.
Major diff with slr is that body is not so important but lenses are very very important (IMHO)
Go with the cheapest body and the best glass you can get.
05/24/2006 04:39:07 PM · #11
Originally posted by sangeeth:

May be you should wait till the photokina when the Sony alpha comes out.
That is also supposed to have image stabilization.
imho image stabilization in camera will not be very effective while using
long tele lenses, but vibration reduction (VR nikon, IS canon, OS sigma) will be effective in that case.

I don't currently own any stabilized lenses but have used a couple, and I have two cameras with stabilized lens systems. And I used to own a Minolta A1 which was the first model to feature in-camera AntiShake. It works well, both in the lens and in the camera. It will give you 1-3 extra stops by allowing you to handhold at very slow shutter speeds to get clear images in low light. It is not a substitute for wide apertures when you need fast shutter speeds to freeze movement in your subject. Whether it's worth the extra cost can depend on what kind of shooting you intend.

A purist might say that your education as a photographer would be more complete if you learn how to use non-stabilized lenses first, and then go on to stabilization.
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