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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Another please calibrate your monitor thread :-P
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05/09/2006 09:21:19 PM · #1
either that or remind myself not to try to do photos that are skewed to either side of the histogram.

Seems that any time I try to do any shot without a normal distribution on the histogram I either get underexposed or blown highlights comments.... eck!

Can we force monitor calibration tests before voting? ;-)
05/09/2006 09:27:53 PM · #2
Yeah it's always gonna be a problem if you want to play with light and shadows.
I now make it a habit to check my submission with the brightness on the monitored turned all the way up as well as well below normal viewing. This helps give me an idea of what others may see and then correct the image if possible.

cheers,
bazz.
05/09/2006 09:34:46 PM · #3
I might have to try that.
05/09/2006 09:59:51 PM · #4
Do you use macs or pcs? Do we know what the breakdown is on dpc? I use a mac, but when i edit a pic for dpc I'll set my proof setup in photoshop to "windows rgb" because i assume more people use windows. my pics always look darker when I use this setting.
05/10/2006 01:14:09 AM · #5
Originally posted by jneria:

Do you use macs or pcs? Do we know what the breakdown is on dpc? I use a mac, but when i edit a pic for dpc I'll set my proof setup in photoshop to "windows rgb" because i assume more people use windows. my pics always look darker when I use this setting.

Mac or Windows doesn't matter in this. The difference between them is the gamma (1.8 for Mac, 2.2 for Windows), but the web standard is all that matters when viewing images online. That standard is set to the sRGB colorspace (which is also at 2.2 gamma).

Since web browsers are not color managed, any images viewed online are viewed with the assumption they are in the sRGB color space with a gamma of 2.2. It just makes sense to convert the image to match the media it is being presented in.

David
05/10/2006 01:38:56 AM · #6
Originally posted by David.C:

[quote=jneria] The difference between them is the gamma (1.8 for Mac, 2.2 for Windows), but the web standard is all that matters when viewing images online. That standard is set to the sRGB colorspace (which is also at 2.2 gamma).


Your right, it is not necessarily a mac vs. pc thing, but since the default gamma's are different on the two platforms, it seems worthwhile to note. If I am viewing a website on my default monitor setting of 1.8 pictures will look noticeably brighter than someone who is viewing them with a monitor set to 2.2. So should everybody view with their gamma set to 2.2?

So i should reword my question: "what is the breakdown of people using 2.2 vs. 1.8 or some other setting determined by their nifty spec gadgets?."
05/10/2006 03:11:19 AM · #7
I've noticed that there is a noticable difference between my home Mac and my work PC when I view my own website - both monitors are meant to be calibrated the same but give different results. The PC monitor is always bit darker than the Mac. When I print the photos they look like they do on the Mac screen - so I guess that just means the PC needs to be recalibrated... yet again a post with no point at all. sorry
05/10/2006 03:22:31 AM · #8
Assuming you're calibrated then open the image in PS and bring up the levels dialog. If you're on windows move the middle slider to 1.2 to see what it will look like at the typical Mac gamma. If you're on Mac then move the middle slider to 0.8 to see what they typical Windows gamma looks like.

Message edited by author 2006-05-10 03:24:36.
05/10/2006 03:24:53 AM · #9
Originally posted by TechnoShroom:

Assuming you're calibrated then open the image in PS and bring up the levels dialog. If you're on windows move the middle slider to 0.8 to see what it will look like at the typical Mac gamma. If you're on Mac then move the middle slider to 1.2 to see what they typical Windows gamma looks like.


What about monitors that just suck? ;-)
05/10/2006 03:29:44 AM · #10
I think you also have a lot of folks who use laptops. If they are older laptops the screens really suck and should not be used to vote. The newer ones aren't so bad - at least some of them. I use a laptop myself, but it's a new one with a good screen and I keep it calibrated.
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