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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Long Exposures...
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08/09/2003 08:30:30 PM · #1
This is a general question, but applies specifically to Coolpix 5700 users, I guess:

When doing longer exposures (i.e., in excess of say 1/2") in daylight, how do you avoid blowing out (overexposing) all your highlights? I'm using the lowest ISO my camera has (100), and using the smallest aperture I can, and even using the max light reduction, but still can't go below about a half second, and even that blows out in some spots.

Should I be using a filter? Maybe it just can't be done on my cam? Am I forced to wait until the light is lower? I was trying to do some long exposures on a waterfall, and just couldn't get it done. I'd rather find an answer than float my cam over the waterfall, so any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Pedro
08/09/2003 08:42:11 PM · #2
You need a Neutral Density (ND) filter which reduces the amount of light reaching the sensor. They're available in various strengths, I've had decent results with an ND8 in bright sunlight.
08/09/2003 09:05:20 PM · #3
Originally posted by bod:

You need a Neutral Density (ND) filter which reduces the amount of light reaching the sensor. They're available in various strengths, I've had decent results with an ND8 in bright sunlight.


Thanks Bod, you are indeed a complex phenomenon.

BTW, I notice the Canon G3 can go down to at least ISO 50...is this common for Digicams? would that help my situation as well?

Pedro

08/09/2003 09:10:17 PM · #4
G3's ISO 50 is more like ISO 100 according to Phil Askey at DPReview.com.
08/09/2003 09:12:50 PM · #5
If you can't afford an ND filter, try using a pair of sunglasses :)
08/09/2003 10:40:10 PM · #6
If you don't believe what i say and feel you need to start a forum thread anyway, why bother asking me in a PM? Doh
08/09/2003 10:43:17 PM · #7
Originally posted by Journey:

If you don't believe what i say and feel you need to start a forum thread anyway, why bother asking me in a PM? Doh


Cuz I'm not at home and can't get my e-mail until tomorrow night, which will be too late for the pic i wanna shoot for this week's challenge. I remembered after I sent you the PM...

No offense intended Helene, you know I like you best :)

Pedro
08/09/2003 10:53:37 PM · #8
Pedro, you could also try a combination of ND filter with a polarizing filter. That would cut out a good deal of light, and the polarizer would get rid of any glare and make the colors more vivid.
08/10/2003 12:57:33 AM · #9
thanks for all the ideas, everyone.

Konodor - I think a 4X ND filter is about $40...I think I can handle that. but good thought anyway :)
08/10/2003 01:17:28 AM · #10
Someone posted on a forum once, instead of carrying a set of ND filters you can carry two PL filters and rotate them to block out as much light as you want.


:)atwl
08/10/2003 03:54:17 AM · #11
Originally posted by Adrian Tung:

Someone posted on a forum once, instead of carrying a set of ND filters you can carry two PL filters and rotate them to block out as much light as you want.


:)atwl


now THAT sounds smart...anyone know if it works? my logic says it should, but there are no guarantees when it comes to me and logic.
08/10/2003 08:18:59 AM · #12
that does sound like a fine idea! anyone tried it?
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