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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> EOS Capture file numbers..
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02/16/2006 05:26:57 AM · #1
I've just started using EOS Capture 1.5 to shoot my 20D tethered to my laptop and for direct transfers and instant viewing on a larger screen. Is there a way to match the file numbers created by the software to match the sequential filenumbers on my camera? I looked in the manual and found nothing.

As a security, I am shooting tethered plus CF card in the camera as a backup. If I were to later download the images from the card onto the laptop, obviously the filenumbers would be mismatched which could produce problems with consistency later down the road when referencing a certain image. Especially because half of my work is done outside the studio, the numbers on my camera roll over much faster. Anyone know a work around or am I stuck?
02/16/2006 06:48:45 AM · #2
I've never found a good enough reason to shoot tethered (using the capture utility). As you've mentioned, you end up with two copies of the image. Plus, it's downright slow.

On the other hand, I've had a lot of fun hooking up my TV to the output of the 20D. If you use a big screen TV, your subject (and/or the people watching you shoot) can see instantly what you are photographing.

It's been kind of fun with uncooperative kids. They see themselves and perk right up. With adults, it makes it easier for them to understand the instructions I am giving them because they can see the same results that I am looking at.

I have about an 18' cable that connects my camera to the TV which lets me move around as I take the pictures. The only downside is ... every now and then I step on the cable and plop it out. Oops.
02/16/2006 07:07:38 AM · #3
I'm not sure if I'm talking about the same thing, but I always click off the instant and go to my computer and then the drive and copy selected and then it keeps the same sequential camera file number instead of assigning a new one. I'm never awake this early, so I might be sleep-talking. ;)
02/16/2006 07:20:11 AM · #4
It seems you are, Marjo :)
Bran-O, I noticed the same thing with the EOS350D. I don't think it's possible to keep consistent sequences. On the whole, EOS capture seems to be pretty basic and inflexible.
02/16/2006 07:28:20 AM · #5
Originally posted by gloda:

It seems you are, Marjo :)
Bran-O, I noticed the same thing with the EOS350D. I don't think it's possible to keep consistent sequences. On the whole, EOS capture seems to be pretty basic and inflexible.

nevermind... lol
02/16/2006 07:48:54 AM · #6
Originally posted by dwterry:

I've never found a good enough reason to shoot tethered (using the capture utility). As you've mentioned, you end up with two copies of the image. Plus, it's downright slow.

On the other hand, I've had a lot of fun hooking up my TV to the output of the 20D. If you use a big screen TV, your subject (and/or the people watching you shoot) can see instantly what you are photographing.

It's been kind of fun with uncooperative kids. They see themselves and perk right up. With adults, it makes it easier for them to understand the instructions I am giving them because they can see the same results that I am looking at.

I have about an 18' cable that connects my camera to the TV which lets me move around as I take the pictures. The only downside is ... every now and then I step on the cable and plop it out. Oops.

Thanks, David. I considered using the video out connected to a TV as well, but I often shoot on location (indoors) and it would prove to be a hassle carrying around a television, along with my camera and lighting gear so portability is an issue. The reason for me shooting tethered would be efficiency. No more waiting while I switch cards, thus no unnecessary breaks during shooting interrupting the momentum and no waiting to load the images from card to laptop during or after the shoot for review, the instant feedback is just an added benefit in between shots which is why I prefer the laptop over the TV. The art director or client can also navigate thru the images as I am shooting, there is no control or navigation of the images if hooked up to a TV other than on-camera.

Marj, I'm not sure what you mean either.. I should be sleeping right now. Maybe you could write another response when you're a bit more awake and I'll read it after I go to bed and wake up and hopefully it'll make more sense!
02/16/2006 12:43:11 PM · #7
Don't get me wrong, I really *like* the idea of being able to transfer images instantly to the computer. I just wish it were faster.

But what I'd really love would be a wi-fi connection. Canon wants an extra $1000 for theirs. I've heard recently that a little P&S Nikon already has it built in ... here's hoping the 20D replacement from Canon will include wi-fi!
02/16/2006 05:12:15 PM · #8
I can't find the same page I was reading yesterday, even going thru my browsing history (I knew I should've bookmarked it!) but here's the product the article was about..

//www.belkin.com/pressroom/releases/uploads/01_03_06CableFreeUSB.html

It may be a blessing for photographers who wish to shoot wirelessly. Here's hoping UWB becomes popular!
02/16/2006 05:33:54 PM · #9
Originally posted by Bran-O-Rama:

Thanks, David. The reason for me shooting tethered would be efficiency. No more waiting while I switch cards, thus no unnecessary breaks during shooting interrupting the momentum and no waiting to load the images from card to laptop during or after the shoot for review, the instant feedback is just an added benefit in between shots which is why I prefer the laptop over the TV. The art director or client can also navigate thru the images as I am shooting, there is no control or navigation of the images if hooked up to a TV other than on-camera.

What I do is use the Camera-USB connection. I'll shoot a test shot, plug in the cable , view it on the laptop and then shoot a sequence. I then transfer the sequence to the laptop, clear the card and carry on. It's not instant but the process of pluggin and unplugging is pretty quick and simple.

Brett
02/16/2006 06:30:23 PM · #10
Originally posted by Bran-O-Rama:

I can't find the same page I was reading yesterday, even going thru my browsing history (I knew I should've bookmarked it!) but here's the product the article was about..

//www.belkin.com/pressroom/releases/uploads/01_03_06CableFreeUSB.html

It may be a blessing for photographers who wish to shoot wirelessly. Here's hoping UWB becomes popular!


COOL! I wonder if anyone has tried that with their camera???
02/16/2006 06:38:37 PM · #11
The article I stumbled upon mentioned exactly that.. Photographers may now have a cheaper alternative to Canon's WFT-E1 or basically allow ANY camera with USB connectivity to be "tethered." After a few months, the price of these wireless USB (UWB) hubs may drop to below $100. Substansial savings compared to Canon's $1000 solution!
02/16/2006 06:40:35 PM · #12
Originally posted by Bran-O-Rama:

The article I stumbled upon mentioned exactly that.. Photographers may now have a cheaper alternative to Canon's WFT-E1 or basically allow ANY camera with USB connectivity to be "tethered." After a few months, the price of these wireless USB (UWB) hubs may drop to below $100. Substansial savings compared to Canon's $1000 solution!


Okay, who wants to go first?

02/16/2006 07:12:29 PM · #13
Me me me! I'll volunteer..
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