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DPChallenge Forums >> Individual Photograph Discussion >> Candids and vendor request of photos for web
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10/03/2005 04:10:05 PM · #1
here is my first try at a couple candids.Both the singer and clown noticed me...how in the heck do you get a true candid?
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On another note, while i was at the Swappin' Meetin' festival i asked a vendor of a indian crafts booth if she cared if i photograph some of her items just for myself. she said she didnt care if i didnt care to send her some for her website. Of course i agreed and have these photos to send her. just curious as what ya'll think of them. I have offered to go to her store (a small fee here to cover cost of gas mostly to her location that is 2 hours away)and photograph additional items for her to post to her website. I think more of a professional approach for her website would be better for her small business. heres the photos...you think she will like or think they are crap? heres her website but she only has a few photos posted now spirit of the white buffalo
native american crafts vendor photos thought a link to the folder would be better than posting all 10 here

Message edited by author 2005-10-03 16:15:13.
10/03/2005 05:38:10 PM · #2
hi mommy....

i think the lady is the best one but all three have some hot spots on them
10/04/2005 01:25:28 PM · #3
one tiny bump since i didnt get but the one comment from my daughter
10/04/2005 01:33:43 PM · #4
I also think true candids are hard to get. The swivel lens feature of my camera does help with that a bit.

The crafts photos all seem a bit dark to me because of the brighter white background. I think a bounced flash would have worked wonders in that big tent to light up the items a bit. She has some interesting items.
10/04/2005 01:42:41 PM · #5
I agree with your daughter, the singer is best because it looks more candid and the background is not distracting.

With candids I found that when someone realised I was shooting and turned to smile, I just say thank you but could they just carry on doing whatever they were doing and then I put the camera up to my eye and wait until they forget I am there. Usually it is only a few minutes until they get involved in something else or are bored trying to jkeep an eye on me and that is when I "get" them. Or I take it from a long way away so they don't know!!!

Your craft pics are fine considering you were just taking them where they were but for the web site I would prefer to see each individual item or group of items on a plain background. The angles and backgrounds do not do them justice as pieces of art. They certainly weren't too dark on my monitor.

P

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10/04/2005 01:49:27 PM · #6
She has some interesting items for sale.

I do believe that the best way to capture images of her work would be in a more light controlled environment, such as a makeshift lightbox. The end result would be far more professional appearing and would lend that professional appearance to her wares and business of selling those wares.
10/04/2005 01:54:11 PM · #7
hahah Jessica is on your case Cher lol
I looked around for you at the meet but couldn't find you.

You gotta learn to bereally sneaky with the camera. Walk around with it to your face all the time and people start ignoring you after they take you for a fool ;)
10/04/2005 02:08:39 PM · #8
Originally posted by Nelzie:

She has some interesting items for sale.

I do believe that the best way to capture images of her work would be in a more light controlled environment, such as a makeshift lightbox. The end result would be far more professional appearing and would lend that professional appearance to her wares and business of selling those wares.


I would LOVE to go there and photograph her stuff but i am too poor to afford to donate my gas and time. if she covered my gas i would leave tomorrow but with gas prices being what they are....

she had some awesome stuff at the festival and she said she didnt bring everything she had! I have always loved Indian stuff(i have a bunch of arrowheads,fish hooks,pottery and grinding stones i found around here) and i just feel the need to do her native crafts justice. I was totaly unprepared to for anyone but me to see any photos I took unless they came out good :o)
10/04/2005 02:12:58 PM · #9
Originally posted by mesmeraj:

hahah Jessica is on your case Cher lol
I looked around for you at the meet but couldn't find you.

You gotta learn to bereally sneaky with the camera. Walk around with it to your face all the time and people start ignoring you after they take you for a fool ;)


i know...i tried to find you too but i figured at about 1 you had alread gone to rehursal :p..ummm I will do that very thing..I can see it now on the front page:
STRANGE WOMAN FOUND STRANGLED WITH CAMERA STRAP: LOCALS SAY SHE WAS NUTZ
10/04/2005 02:23:21 PM · #10
According to Steve McCurry ( all bow in revrence) you get a good candid by applying liberal amounts of time. The person who you are shooting will look at you when you first point the camera at them, but after you have been doing it for a few seconds, a few hours or in his case days, they accept you as part of the scene and ignore you.

If you can't spare the time I have found that shooting with a long lens held away from the eye, either on a tripod or held in the crook of the elbow, doesn't get the same reaction as snapping the camera to the eye. Just shoot loose and pray.

Message edited by author 2005-10-04 14:24:32.
10/04/2005 02:30:12 PM · #11
I shoot candid shots every weekend and sell quite a few of them. With street performers I've realized that if you hang around for awhile keeping your lens on them continuously they start paying attention to their other guests and forget you're there.
As for sneaking up on someone, come from either side on the back and keep your lens to your eye. Check out your own path beforehand so as not to trip over anything. You can usually catch them as they begin to notice your arrival but before they can react to your lens. With that in mind if they don't notice you and you want a little face in the image, cough! Subtle huh?
10/04/2005 02:32:29 PM · #12
Oh, and a little fill flash will help on those sunny days.
10/04/2005 02:39:25 PM · #13
OK..i think i got the handle on the candids: attach camera to eye,walk around till people think im nuts(which if ya know me you will already KNOW that)spray shoot and pray, and cough all with the fill flash on...got it! :p

edit to add: mwaaaaaaaah

Message edited by author 2005-10-04 14:40:07.
10/04/2005 02:48:07 PM · #14
Originally posted by cislander:

I shoot candid shots every weekend and sell quite a few of them. With street performers I've realized that if you hang around for awhile keeping your lens on them continuously they start paying attention to their other guests and forget you're there.
As for sneaking up on someone, come from either side on the back and keep your lens to your eye. Check out your own path beforehand so as not to trip over anything. You can usually catch them as they begin to notice your arrival but before they can react to your lens. With that in mind if they don't notice you and you want a little face in the image, cough! Subtle huh?

Do you get a signed release from these street performers before selling the photographs?
10/04/2005 03:03:06 PM · #15
Originally posted by lenkphotos:

Do you get a signed release from these street performers before selling the photographs?


i find in these situations that, if you couple the model's signing the release with the email information so you can send them some free shots they tend not to have a probleb signing.
10/04/2005 03:42:46 PM · #16
Originally posted by BrennanOB:

Originally posted by lenkphotos:

Do you get a signed release from these street performers before selling the photographs?


i find in these situations that, if you couple the model's signing the release with the email information so you can send them some free shots they tend not to have a probleb signing.

That sounds like a good idea. Since I've yet to try and sell candids of people, it just seemed to me like asking for too much by thrusting a pre-printed form in the face of strangers because you want to use THEIR image in ways only YOU have control over, WITHOUT any compensation to them. ...Maybe I just fear rejection?...
10/04/2005 03:52:12 PM · #17
I shoot a lot of stills and video of jr. and sr. high students, some of whom are VERY camera shy (the others won't get out of the camera, lol).

There are a few things I do that I find help.

1. Shoot a lot. Shoot until they put their hand in your face and then keep shooting. Eventually you'll wear them out and they'll just ignore you because they know "thats just what Tammy does, ignore her"

2. Aim, focus, wait, shoot. If the person catches you aim the camera at something to the side, above, or behind them. After awhile they'll give up trying to figure out what you're doing and write you off as the weird photog. After they ignore you, get a couple candids.

3. Long lens, IS, no flash. IS (Image-Stabelization) will help you shoot at a distance handheld under various light conditions.

4. Shoot when they're distracted. It's easier to get a candid of a clown performing for a child than when they are standing there by themself.

5. When getting candids of people you know make sure you don't use pictures that embarass them. This is particularly important in my case. When I use video or stills for presentations I look at everyone in the shot and make sure no one is picking their nose, or looks really horrible. Because I work with teens, who tend to be mortified with even a flattering picture, I'm particularly careful about this one. Doesn't mean I don't use goofy pics, but I'm careful that they'll have a good effect, not one that belittles the person in the picture.


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