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DPChallenge Forums >> Challenge Results >> Ignoramus Noncogitans
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Showing posts 1 - 13 of 13, (reverse)
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11/18/2002 09:23:44 AM · #1
Here are the original untouched pictures of my entry. For all you who are wondering what it is.....well, I do too. All I can tell you is that I can not find anything like it on the net. It's some species of fungus. If any of you have any leads to help with this identification feel free to assist. I'm curious if this is a new previously undiscovered species. //www.pbase.com/indigodingo/ignoramus_noncogitans_
11/19/2002 06:22:27 PM · #2
ah. i assumed it was the brain of something, because of the title. interesting nonetheless
11/19/2002 06:42:01 PM · #3
Looks gooey. Wouldn't want to step on it. Yick

The same way I wouldn't want to step on a cockroack... *crunch*. Yuck
11/19/2002 09:28:47 PM · #4
I have a few questions.
1- Did you find it in a wooded area?
2- What was growing nearby...if you can recall?
3- Did it have an odor?
4- What were the approximate dimensions?
I see something with a similar pattern as that in your picture # 142 in Bigelow's Pocket Guide on page 83 that grows ONLY on decaying wood. It's a member of the Jelly Fungi varieties. Auricularia Auricula, and fruits in Summer into Fall. The underside is the like # 142.
The thing that has me puzzled though, is that yours looks like it's growing from earth, not wood.

11/20/2002 12:39:00 AM · #5
Judging by the looks alone, I would have to agree with Gracious and say that it does seem to be some member of the Auricularia (wood-ear mushroom) family, despite the fact that it is not obviously growing on wood.

Fungi are tricky. There may be enough decaying woody matter just below the surface for the fungus to grow. It doesn't have to be on a tree.

Or, it could very well be something else entirely. Like I said, fungi can be tricky' - )

11/20/2002 12:55:44 AM · #6
Member Martin helped me out when I was trying to identify the orange fungus referenced in this thread.



* This message has been edited by the author on 11/20/2002 12:55:45 AM.
11/20/2002 08:50:38 AM · #7
When I lived in the Adirondack Forest, I took a lot of fungus/mushroom pictures. It wasn't unusual to find me crawling on my belly on the cold, damp forest floor to capture a shot. They are interesting subjects, and difficult to identify. That is precisely why it is rarely advisable to eat, what may appear to be edible varieties.
In Saugerties, NY an experienced "shroomer" died by ingesting what they were certain of.
11/20/2002 05:42:50 PM · #8
Originally posted by Gracious:
I have a few questions.
1- Did you find it in a wooded area?
2- What was growing nearby...if you can recall?
3- Did it have an odor?
4- What were the approximate dimensions?
I see something with a similar pattern as that in your picture # 142 in Bigelow's Pocket Guide on page 83 that grows ONLY on decaying wood. It's a member of the Jelly Fungi varieties. Auricularia Auricula, and fruits in Summer into Fall. The underside is the like # 142.
The thing that has me puzzled though, is that yours looks like it's growing from earth, not wood.



I have a few questions.
1- Did you find it in a wooded area?
2- What was growing nearby...if you can recall?
3- Did it have an odor?
4- What were the approximate dimensions?
I see something with a similar pattern as that in your picture # 142 in Bigelow's Pocket Guide on page 83 that grows ONLY on decaying wood. It's a member of the Jelly Fungi varieties. Auricularia Auricula, and fruits in Summer into Fall. The underside is the like # 142.
The thing that has me puzzled though, is that yours looks like it's growing from earth, not wood.



To answer your questions:
1- yes
2- it was a mixture of deciduous trees both hard and soft woods. There was also a grassy patch very near its location.
3- it had no detectable odor other than an earthy smell...kind of like dirt.
4- it was approximately 3.5 inches x 3 inches at its widest points.

Here is how I examined it. Upon discovery I took a few pics. With my ear near the ground I took a twig and gently lifted the edge to see what it was attached to. I found nothing attached to it and no stem or mycelium. After rolling it over I took some more pics. Then I picked it up examined, smelled, and lightly squeezed it. It was slightly slimy/wet and felt rubbery. Then I decided to put it back as I found it so that it could reproduce. Now I wish I would have taken it back home to preserve it and try to get a spore print, maybe examine it under a microscope. If I remember correctly the weather in the preceding days had temperatures in the 50-60 degree range and dry. This was found in close proximity to a small stream so it may have got its moisture from the condensation every evening.

Thanks for the direction with the Pocket guide. I've been following the identification keys for jelly fungi, as thatís what I suspected it was but have had no luck in finding something unattached to any substrate

11/20/2002 05:49:09 PM · #9
Could it have been kicked off/ disturbed, moved by an animal etc ?
11/20/2002 07:36:22 PM · #10
Aren't we a wonderful lot of sleuths?...lol I still think we're on the right track, eg: Jelly Fungi
You know what? I think you did the right thing by leaving it in place. The general rule of thumb I try to follow in the woods, is if it is in abundance, then it MAY not hurt to take a sample. If it is the ONLY one of it's kind, or very few, leave it to reproduce.
Mushrooms and fungus would be a good theme for a challenge. Everyone has access to at least the many store bought varieties, and we can photograph 'em like we did pencils.
11/20/2002 08:58:24 PM · #11
Originally posted by Gracious:
...The general rule of thumb I try to follow in the woods, is if it is in abundance, then it MAY not hurt to take a sample. If it is the ONLY one of it's kind, or very few, leave it to reproduce.
Mushrooms and fungus would be a good theme for a challenge. Everyone has access to at least the many store bought varieties, and we can photograph 'em like we did pencils.


Oh boy, I can send in a solid black frame and call it "Soup: Cream of Coprinus comatus" (a.k.a. Ink Caps).
11/20/2002 09:39:18 PM · #12
Originally posted by Gordon:
Could it have been kicked off/ disturbed, moved by an animal etc ?

I donít think that it was knocked off anything as it was under several leaves and only a small portion was visible. Now that I think about it I didn't mention that before. I suppose there could have been more under the debris but I wasn't about to go rooting around the forest floor.....lol. Still haven't had any luck searching with Google.
11/20/2002 09:48:58 PM · #13
Here's the top few links I got doing a search for "Mycology." ne of the university sites should have someone you can email for an ID. I didn't have time to check these yet, just copied 'em:

Matching Sites:
About these results

Mycology Resources - ... The WWW Virtual Library: Mycology. Welcome! ... Directory of Mycology Resources Pages. About these pages, Collections of fungi: herbaria, culture collections. ...
//biodiversity.uno.edu/~fungi/

Mycology Online Home Page - Mycology Online is a WWW resource of clinically significant mycological information. ... Mycology Online has been designated a Netscape Open Directory Cool Site.
//www.mycology.adelaide.edu.au/

MykoWeb: Mushrooms, Fungi, Mycology - MykoWeb -- information on mushrooms and other fungi, mycophagy, and mycology primarily for the amateur. Includes descriptions, photographs, recipes, and more. ...
//www.mykoweb.com/

Systematic Botany Mycology - Home page for Systematic Botany and Mycology Laboratory, contains systematic resources, searchable databases and reports on research activities.
//nt.ars-grin.gov/

Mycology.Net - Mycology.Net. an Internet Site Containing Information about Diversity of Fungi. The current page normally uses a navigation frame on the left side. ...
//www.mycology.net/
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