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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Just got the 20D!!! (have a lens question please)
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09/17/2005 09:14:30 PM · #1
Hey! I'm so excited! I just got my new camera today! I already got the EF-S 17-85MM f4-5.6 IS USM lens and am planning on getting the Sigma 70-200f/2.8 this week and the Canon macro 60 mm for Christmas. My question is what's another lens that goes well with these three?
09/17/2005 09:15:49 PM · #2
Originally posted by pianomom:

Hey! I'm so excited! I just got my new camera today! I already got the EF-S 17-85MM f4-5.6 IS USM lens and am planning on getting the Sigma 70-200f/2.8 this week and the Canon macro 60 mm for Christmas. My question is what's another lens that goes well with these three?


You have to get the 50mm 1.8... it's on;y $70.00 and worth it's weight in gold!
09/17/2005 09:26:32 PM · #3
Originally posted by pianomom:

Hey! I'm so excited! I just got my new camera today! I already got the EF-S 17-85MM f4-5.6 IS USM lens and am planning on getting the Sigma 70-200f/2.8 this week and the Canon macro 60 mm for Christmas. My question is what's another lens that goes well with these three?


I suggest either a very wide 10 or 12mm prime (rectilinear, not fisheye). I have the somewhat expensive 10-22mm, and I'm beginning to wonder if I need any other lenses!

Here's one of my recent shots at 10mm (at Acadia):

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I should add the reason I say prime is that it may save some money over the 10-22. I almost always use mine at 10mm!


Message edited by author 2005-09-17 21:27:27.
09/17/2005 09:30:09 PM · #4
I'll second nshapiro's recommendation. It's a whole other way of seeing. It's just SO damned wide, the depth of field is SO extreme. Awesome lens. I got one too, need I add? In fact, I think he "copied" me (wink).

Robt.
09/17/2005 10:12:16 PM · #5
As long as we're talking about wide angles, let me say that I happen to love them as well! I got the Sigma 10-20mm, which is quite a bit cheaper than the canon, and its also an EF rather than EF-S mount so if you ever do graduate to a full frame Canon you'll be able to use it still and from a review I've read it can be used full frame from about 11 or 12mm without vignetting.

I've also got some samples in my Portfolio.
09/17/2005 10:57:07 PM · #6
Ok, thanks! I'll write these down for my "wishlist". :)
09/18/2005 02:48:03 AM · #7
Hey pianomom,

congrats, great choice you made there! So the hefty 20D pleased you more than the smaller, lighter, quieter, lady-ish 350D/rebel after all?

For wide angle, DO cosider the Tokina 12-24.

It's excellent in every way, much better built than the Canon, Tamron or Sigma, relatively inexpensive and optically excellent.

In recent tests it beat both the Nikon and Canon equivalents! I have the 10-22 EF-S but after trying a friend's Tokina, I'll just have to get that, too - and maybe sell the Canon later... anyone interested? ;-)

bruno
09/18/2005 04:19:00 AM · #8
Why not just get a prime at wide angle? I have no experience but ouwldn't be easier to have 10mm prime?

your 18-75 will cover the rest.
09/18/2005 04:42:31 AM · #9
try and get a 10mm prime for the price of any of the mentioned lenses and let me know where you found one...

even just a good 12 or 15mm prime costs an arm and a leg, fish-eye or not :-(
09/18/2005 04:52:19 AM · #10
ah
09/18/2005 05:10:31 AM · #11
Originally posted by toddhead:



You have to get the 50mm 1.8... it's on;y $70.00 and worth it's weight in gold!


I second this, that tiny little thing is amazing. You have to run forth and back to zoom but the clarity sharpness and everything is just GREAT!
09/18/2005 05:16:21 AM · #12
What type of images do you enjoy or plan to take with the new toy?
09/18/2005 06:40:23 AM · #13
Zenitar 16mm f/2.8 :)
09/18/2005 07:32:25 AM · #14
Thanks!
BeeGee, yes, I did like the 20D better even though it is heavier. :)

As for the type of pictures, I've taken sports, scenery, macro, family stuff, our dog, all kinds of things. Which reminds me, I read in one of by books about buildings. It was showing pictures of buildings that looked crooked unless you got one of the special lens for that (off the top of my head I can't remember if it was the tilt or shift?). Do any of my lens or other ones take pics of buildings that are ok too or do you have to get one of the special ones?

Message edited by author 2005-09-19 19:51:59.
09/18/2005 09:14:19 AM · #15
The Canon 10-22mm totally rocks!
09/18/2005 09:19:39 AM · #16
Originally posted by pianomom:

...Which reminds me, I read in one of by books about buildings. It was showing pictures of buildings that looked crooked unless you got one of the special lens for that (off the top of my head I can't remember if it was the tilt or shift?). Do any of my lens or other ones take pics of buildings that are ok too or do you have to get one of the special ones?


You do need a special tilt/shift lens to get it right in-camera, though you can do some perspective correction in software. As with many software solutions to harware problems, there is a trade-off. In this case, some areas of the pic will be stretched, and lose a little detail in the process.
Canon does offer three tilt/shift lenses, all manual focus, and all pretty expensive. They are the TS-E 24mm f/3.5, the TS-E 45mm f/2.8, and the TS-E 90mm f/2.8. They all are priced around $1100.

Message edited by author 2005-09-18 09:22:58.
09/18/2005 10:17:45 AM · #17
I also would add a voice for the constant aperture Tokina 12-24. I've heard it is pretty good, but having the f4 really makes the lens a lot simpler to use. One less thing to distract you from taking the picture.

Also, If you are considering a prime macro lens, may I recommend the Canon 100mm f2.8 Macro (internally focused). It is going to allow you a bit more distance from the subject, which will allow you more freedom when shooting animals and insects. Also, the 100mm is EF, and the 60mm is EF-S. The difference is that if you ever do upgrade to a different crop factor camera (maybe a second hand 1d MK II in a year or so or a 5D, who knows), you will still be able to use the lens with that camera. This also helps with resale value.

The 60mm is a really great lens, but financially a little bit less sensible in the long run. For those that don't mind this, there is nothing actually wrong with the lens.

Also, if you do try to use the REVERSED 50mm 1.8 for SUPER close-ups, you will find that the minimum focal distance is greatly reduced. Having the 100mm instead of the 60mm will be greatly appreciated in that case.

Nobody who spends 1300 dollars on a 20D should even think twice about getting the 50mm 1.8.

Congrats on getting the 20D. You are going to be so happy with it and your new lenses.

Check into using the 1.4x Teleconverter with the Sigma 70-200 2.8

You might want to consider your options and check into getting the Canon L series lens at f4.
09/18/2005 11:23:21 PM · #18
Great! Thanks for all of your advice. I'm printing all of this info. Needless to say, it will be a while before I can get some of the other ones but I wanted to know which ones would be good to put on my "wishlist" for the future. (If the tilt/shift lenses are that expensive, I guess I'll do any correcting with software.) Thanks again!

Message edited by author 2005-09-18 23:29:30.
09/18/2005 11:33:46 PM · #19
To keep perspective squared up, you need to have the sensor plane on the camera set up truly vertical. The receding perspective come shwen you tilt the camera up to see the top of the building. The canon shift lens are very nice, but 24mm isn't really wide enough for architecture on a 20D 1.6 crop. They are designed for 35mm cameras.

Here's what I do: I square the tripod up so the camera is vertically square also, then rotate to vertical mode. I get a lot of foreground, and crop it out in photoshop. The 10mm is so wide this works fine for all but the most extreme close quarters on tall buildings.

Robt.
09/18/2005 11:43:09 PM · #20
where did you get camera?
09/19/2005 09:44:17 AM · #21
Ever tried ghetto tilt-shift? Just unscrew the lens, cover the gap with your hand and tilt/shift away merrily. Can get some interesting results without spending a fortune on a lensbaby, if you're careful about covering any light leaks.
09/19/2005 09:53:34 AM · #22
Thanks, Robert. I'll try that too. I know when we're on vacations I'll be taking pictures of buildings also so this is good to know. Looks like I'll need that 10mm. :)

alixmiles, I got the camera body from Wolf Camera near my house. Since I've only been doing this "seriously" for about a year, I thought if I got it from them, then I could take advantage of their $280 worth of classes that you get when you purchase a camera from them. I've also been doing LOTS of reading and I also have a great "photo buddy" that I met on here that has been a real God-send.

Thanks for all of your help! :)
09/19/2005 11:22:13 AM · #23
The 20D will focus 3 times more accurately with a 2.8 lens attached thatn with a non-2.8 lens. Keep that in mind when lens shopping.

If you do much indoor shooting or visit museums (or shoot weddings...) a 18-50 2.8 (sigma)/24-70 2.8 (canon)/28-75 2.8 (tamron) lens will be very useful. You can avoid using flash in many situations this way.

I'd post a sample but the site is too slow...i can't get to my profile. If you can, check out the Henry Ford (museum) shots to see how nice a wide aperture is in low light.
09/19/2005 12:17:27 PM · #24
Originally posted by toddhead:

Originally posted by pianomom:

Hey! I'm so excited! I just got my new camera today! I already got the EF-S 17-85MM f4-5.6 IS USM lens and am planning on getting the Sigma 70-200f/2.8 this week and the Canon macro 60 mm for Christmas. My question is what's another lens that goes well with these three?


You have to get the 50mm 1.8... it's on;y $70.00 and worth it's weight in gold!

it's a great price/performance ratio. The 50mm 1.4 is also exceptional, and a good buy. The 85mm 1.8 is also a great performer.
09/19/2005 02:34:12 PM · #25
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by pianomom:

...Which reminds me, I read in one of by books about buildings. It was showing pictures of buildings that looked crooked unless you got one of the special lens for that (off the top of my head I can't remember if it was the tilt or shift?). Do any of my lens or other ones take pics of buildings that are ok too or do you have to get one of the special ones?


You do need a special tilt/shift lens to get it right in-camera, though you can do some perspective correction in software. As with many software solutions to harware problems, there is a trade-off. In this case, some areas of the pic will be stretched, and lose a little detail in the process.
Canon does offer three tilt/shift lenses, all manual focus, and all pretty expensive. They are the TS-E 24mm f/3.5, the TS-E 45mm f/2.8, and the TS-E 90mm f/2.8. They all are priced around $1100.


You can order some Russian made T/S lenses for Canon from Kiev Camera. I don't know anything about them, other than they are quite a bit cheaper than the Canon versions. They might be easier to justify purchasing than the Canon.
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