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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> 20D in my car is it bad ???
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07/22/2005 04:10:59 PM · #1
I take my camera everywhere, latley its been getting really hot and my camera is in my car in my camera bag. is it bad for my camera to be sitting in the heat of the bag and car all day.
07/22/2005 04:12:11 PM · #2
I don't think computers like heat. :-)
07/22/2005 04:12:56 PM · #3
I've seen a couple of these threads and the general consensus has usually been yes - cameras + excessive heat = bad. Also mentioned was that the coolest place in a car is generally underneath or right behind the drivers seat. This is just what I remember, as I don't really have any experience with this myself.
07/22/2005 04:13:03 PM · #4
Not too sure about damage to the circuitry, but the battery does not like heat.
07/22/2005 04:15:00 PM · #5
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07/22/2005 04:15:59 PM · #6
If it's 90 degrees outside it is probably 120 inside...not good for any electronic equipment like a Digital Camera.
07/22/2005 04:22:19 PM · #7
Battery is the main issue. mine specs operating environment at 32 - 104 deg f (0 - 40 deg C) at 85% himidity or less. A lot of U.S. environments currently exceed that not to mention the temps inside a closed up car.

As for storage, most electronics undergo much more extreme temps in shipment and are not effected as long as they are brought back to operating temps before useing.
07/22/2005 06:03:59 PM · #8
Have long wondered about this myself. I've wondered what professional photographers do with their gear while on assignment. Many have too much equipment to carry with them so it has to be somewhere. Likely in a vehicle, locked. Plus there are lots of locations in this world where photo-journalists are assigned where the temperatures and conditions are truly horrible.

A working professional I met on a Texas shoot shared his thoughts with me on this topic. Long term exposure (several days) in a hot car is probably not good. A few hours should be OK as long as reasonable precautions are taken like placement on the floor out of direct sun and covered with adequate insulation like a padded camera bag and a couple of towels.

I suspect that manufacturers test for adverse conditions during research and development. At least in their high end proffessional grade equipment.
07/22/2005 06:06:38 PM · #9
Keep it in a cooler.
07/22/2005 06:08:35 PM · #10
Yes. Bad. Your 20D belongs in my bag. ;-)
07/22/2005 06:09:21 PM · #11
i heard that the trunk was a cooler part of the car because the sun doesnt shine in and act as a greenhouse. well at least i hope so!

I have my camera in my car frequently and i put in my trunk and wrap the bag with a large blanket or towel. the towel acts as an insulator and when i grab my camera it is still cool.
07/22/2005 06:33:03 PM · #12
not sure but I would not leave mine in the car, with the heat, especially the heat we are having here in NYC right now. Kind of scared it running something or getting stolen.
07/22/2005 06:34:47 PM · #13
this all seems very logical. There is, however, one fact no one seems to touch on.. My car stereo works just fine and it's in there all day everyday. It's also there in the rain, snow, wind. although rain and snow don't hit the inside of the car, the water in the air (humidity) does. I've never had a problem with my car stereo, or walkmans or about anything else (other than plastic melting in direct heat.)

I suppose the sauder inside could heat up and pull apart but I guess that's more of a 'did I get a poorly made camera?'

I wouldn't make a habit out of leaving my camera in a 'sauna' but I doubt it does anyting other than what a metal camera case would do while you were waiting to enter the football game or whatever.
07/22/2005 06:51:20 PM · #14
I was concerned a little about this myself (as well as it being stolen or broken). I bought insurance on my equipment. I got $2500 worth of insurance for $40/year. Covers any kind of damage. I figured for what I paid for my equipment, it's worth a few extra bucks just to protect it.
07/22/2005 07:01:08 PM · #15
Back in the day, we kept our gear in a very large igloo cooler in the back of the van. Never had a problem. Didn't use ice or anything, just kept it shut. I doubt it got asny hotter than 90 degrees in there even on the hottest days. I wouldn't worry about it. frankly. Film was a bigger issue,a nd that's no longer a problem. We carried the film in smaller coolers with gelpacks, and brought it up to environmental temperature before opening the sealed packages.

R.
07/22/2005 07:13:30 PM · #16
yes it can be a problem. Don't do it.
07/22/2005 07:19:07 PM · #17
I can't imagine that 120F would damage your camera... What if you took it to death valley to do a photoshoot? What about the people in iraq? It's 120F+ there some days. Like mentioned earlier, I bet it's not good for the battery, but I doubt it's too bad for the camera... Anybody know for sure what the opperational temp specs are for the 20D?
07/22/2005 07:29:49 PM · #18
"Working temperature range 0°C- 40°C / 32°F - 104°F
Working humidity 85% or less"

However, these specs are usually very conservative... I know my friend had no problems with the 300D in Antarctica, and I had no problems with one in China in the winter. I don't have hands on with extreme heat though.

oh and if you're wondering where I found that....
right here

Message edited by author 2005-07-22 19:30:36.
07/22/2005 07:32:56 PM · #19
Originally posted by ReallyColorBlind:

I was concerned a little about this myself (as well as it being stolen or broken). I bought insurance on my equipment. I got $2500 worth of insurance for $40/year. Covers any kind of damage. I figured for what I paid for my equipment, it's worth a few extra bucks just to protect it.


Where did you get this insurance from? Is is a personal property rider or do they consider it 'professional equipment'?
07/22/2005 07:42:19 PM · #20
It's toasted. You should sell it to me really cheap.

I wouldn't worry about it. Your camera bag is a pretty good insulator. If the camera is really warm when you pick it up, it's probably best not to turn it on and use it for a long time, but otherwise it's fine.

If storing it in a car would be bad, there would be a warning in the owners manual. If there was a max storage temp, it would be listed to avoid customer returns.

As for operating temps, reliability engineers hate being wrong so they are very conservative. In reality that 32-104 is probably 10-130.
07/22/2005 07:55:35 PM · #21
Originally posted by kyebosh:

"Working temperature range 0°C- 40°C / 32°F - 104°F
Working humidity 85% or less"

However, these specs are usually very conservative... I know my friend had no problems with the 300D in Antarctica, and I had no problems with one in China in the winter. I don't have hands on with extreme heat though.

oh and if you're wondering where I found that....
right here


I did say battery and those specs protect the specified performance for the batteries, nothing else.

Consider that your car is crammed with electronics which are subjected to conditions that exceed any manufacturer’s specs. Seem to continue to work don't they?
07/22/2005 07:58:58 PM · #22
It does say not to store in a hot car, at least in the Nikon manual. It talks about not storing the camera in temps above 50C/155F for example in a closed vehicle on a hot day.
Besides why would you want to take the risk?

Message edited by author 2005-07-22 21:51:05.
07/22/2005 08:06:19 PM · #23
I live in Bullhead City... last week it reached oh... 127 ...we here never make it a practice..to leave cameras, cd's, tapes.lol.. in the car...if we are out shooting... and go to dinner... or to a movie... we carry it in with us... really a bummer sometimes.. but I would rather have a nice 1000 dollar camera... than a piece of junk..ourcameras have cost us 2000 dollars... if not more...
07/22/2005 08:24:36 PM · #24
Originally posted by tfaust:

Originally posted by ReallyColorBlind:

I was concerned a little about this myself (as well as it being stolen or broken). I bought insurance on my equipment. I got $2500 worth of insurance for $40/year. Covers any kind of damage. I figured for what I paid for my equipment, it's worth a few extra bucks just to protect it.


Where did you get this insurance from? Is is a personal property rider or do they consider it 'professional equipment'?


Since photography is just a hobby, I took out a personal rider on my home owner's insurance. I have Statefarm insurance.
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