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05/05/2003 12:41:43 AM · #1
Well, Kindergarten was a long time ago for me (although I guess I go 1 day a week now with Isaac), but in graphic arts I always learned there were two sets of primary colors:
Additive (light) = Red - Green - Blue
Subtractive (pigments) = Cyan - Magenta - Yellow

All the additive colors together make white, all the subtractive colors together make black (in an ideal world).

Neither of these combination includes Red, Blue, and Yellow. Are we going to be limited to these three colors, or can we include all six "primary colors?"
05/05/2003 12:42:52 AM · #2
It's just another color challenge.
05/05/2003 12:43:14 AM · #3
oh wonderful... now no one will know what colors to photograph... :(
05/05/2003 12:44:31 AM · #4
Originally posted by jmsetzler:

oh wonderful... now no one will know what colors to photograph... :(

You want to hide this thread right now? I figured someone would bring it up -- I figured the sooner the better.
05/05/2003 12:45:05 AM · #5
I'm doing a lenscap or something b/w.
05/05/2003 01:05:22 AM · #6
actually general on some sites I have found red, yellow, blue seem to be called the primaries.. primarily that is :o)

sample one

sample two
05/05/2003 01:10:21 AM · #7
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Well, Kindergarten was a long time ago for me (although I guess I go 1 day a week now with Isaac), but in graphic arts I always learned there were two sets of primary colors:
Additive (light) = Red - Green - Blue
Subtractive (pigments) = Cyan - Magenta - Yellow

All the additive colors together make white, all the subtractive colors together make black (in an ideal world).

Neither of these combination includes Red, Blue, and Yellow. Are we going to be limited to these three colors, or can we include all six "primary colors?"


In the world of art the primary colors taught are red, yellow and blue, when all mixed together equally they make black. In unequal parts they make shades of brown. Green is a secondary color it takes yellow and blue to make green.

Actual breakdown of the colorwheel is like this....red, yellow and blue are the primary colors, orange, green and violet are seconday colors, cause they are acheived by mixing equal parts of two primary colors, all other colors are tertiary colors, cause they take unequal parts of the primary colors to create them.

The colorwheel and the differences between primary, secondary and tertiary colors are well described here

//aol.bhg.com/bhg/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/bhg/story/data/2181.xml
05/05/2003 01:18:24 AM · #8
I could be way off but I think Red Yellow Blue are the primary mixing colors. While Red, Blue, and Green are the primary colors for light (I know I learned about them in Physics class) Then cyan magenta and yellow are... umm something else (I know my printer uses cyan magenta and yellow...)

I do remember grade school and learning that red yellow and blue were the primary colors. I'd assume the challenge wants red yellow and blue since that's what it said though. (If I remember right primary colors don't look so great together though...) I guess this could be open for some interpretation. Or maybe a Kindergarten teacher could give us some pointers? :)

I think this is a difference between the primary colors of the phyiscs of light, and the primary colors of art. or something along those lines

Back in kindergarten, you learned that your primary colors are red, yellow, and blue. Make some good use out of this fundamental knowledge for this week's challenge!
05/05/2003 10:03:40 AM · #9
GeneralE is right. I guess. RGB are the primary colors for LIGHT, and as photography deals with LIGHT....
Now the green in RGB is a very yellowish green...
05/05/2003 10:31:49 AM · #10
Trust the people on this site to make something as simple and "primary" as primary colors into a complicated discussion. : ) Does anyone remember the song, "The primary colors are 1, 2, 3 red, yellow and blue...". I rememeber Kindergarten, and if I didn't I could ask Lottie, who is an experienced Kindergartener after 8 months of it.
05/05/2003 10:35:33 AM · #11
They didn't have kindergarten when I started school. Does that mean I don't get to play?
05/05/2003 10:41:54 AM · #12
Hmmm, I just asked Lottie if she knew what the primary colors were, and she stared at me blankly. I probed her a little further and sang the little song, and she just said, "Why are you asking me this, Mom?". I think we're all in trouble, if we didn't learn it in Kindergarten I guess we have no clue what to photograph this week!!!!
05/05/2003 10:48:53 AM · #13
I think the real problem here is the difference in the 3 main colors of the theory of light verus the 3 primary colors. Light says it is red, yellow and green while theory of color tells us it is red, yellow and blue.

Primary colors are colors you can't get by mixing any other colors together, so keep this in mind you can't mix anything to make red, yellow or blue, but you can mix yellow and blue to make green thus making green a secondary color not a primary.

Message edited by author 2003-05-05 10:49:21.
05/05/2003 10:57:36 AM · #14
hmm why not stop arguing about it and just shoot the three colors given to us? it is useless having these discussions. it won't have a huge impact on the composition of photos in the challenge
05/05/2003 11:05:06 AM · #15
Originally posted by achiral:

hmm why not stop arguing about it and just shoot the three colors given to us? it is useless having these discussions. it won't have a huge impact on the composition of photos in the challenge

You would prefer to argue about...
I'm going to Kindergarten tomorrow, so I'll report back after I ask the teacher...
05/05/2003 11:08:19 AM · #16
From Digital Image Processing : R. Gonzalez and R. Woods

"Owing to the structure of the human eye, all colours are seen as variable combinations of the 3 so-called primary colours red, green and blue.
(CIE standard blue = 435.8nm green = 546.1nm and red = 700nm wavelength light)...However, as the visible spectrum is continuous, no single colour may be called red, green or blue.

The primary colours (when the wavelength is allowed to vary) can be added to produce the secondary colours of light. Magenta( red + blue) , cyan (green + blue ) and yellow (red + green). Mixing the 3 primaries, or a secondary with its opposite primary colour, in the right proportions produces white light.

Differentiating between the primary colours of light and the primary colours of pigements is important. For pigments, a primary colour is defined as one that subtracts or absorbs a primary colour of light, and reflects or transmits the other two. Therefore the primary colours of pigments are magenta, cyan and yellow, and the secondary pigment colours are red, green and blue. Mixing the three pigment primaries, or a secondary with its opposite primary, produce black."

Now with that in mind, the reason that red, yellow and blue are used for artistic primaries is that the pigment primaries described above were not available, historically. The correct pigments could not be manufactured for oil paints until recent times. RYB is the next best approximation, although if you look at a colour chart you can see that there are many colours that cannot be produced by mixing RYB.

But in the end, the challenge says 'Red, Yellow, Blue' so all this technical stuff is interesting but irrelevant. But at least I get paid to read these books anyway.

05/05/2003 11:11:24 AM · #17
I got a dollar that says a black and white photos wins. It'll be the "Anti-Primary-Color"!
05/05/2003 11:28:14 AM · #18
Well if we want to be technical about it, nobody is going to enter a red/ yellow/ blue picture anyway. They will all be a mix of red, green and blue, captured by red, green and blue sensors, displayed by red, green and blue phosphors or transistors and recorded by red, blue and green receptors in your eye.

So does everyone automatically fail to meet the challenge ?
05/05/2003 11:43:34 AM · #19
Originally posted by Gordon:

Well if we want to be technical about it, nobody is going to enter a red/ yellow/ blue picture anyway. They will all be a mix of red, green and blue, captured by red, green and blue sensors, displayed by red, green and blue phosphors or transistors and recorded by red, blue and green receptors in your eye.

So does everyone automatically fail to meet the challenge ?


I'm voting everyone a 1, just to be safe.
05/05/2003 12:22:49 PM · #20
I'm voting everyone a 10, just to be safe.
05/05/2003 12:25:09 PM · #21
Originally posted by Gordon:

Well if we want to be technical about it, nobody is going to enter a red/ yellow/ blue picture anyway. They will all be a mix of red, green and blue, captured by red, green and blue sensors, displayed by red, green and blue phosphors or transistors and recorded by red, blue and green receptors in your eye.

So does everyone automatically fail to meet the challenge ?


So what happens when someone is able to capture the red, blue and yellow? Are you going to be able to admit it is possible? By the way did you know that black is acheived by mixing equal parts of those 3 primary colors? So hey would a photo taken with a lense cap still on the camera be all 3 of the primary colors?
05/05/2003 12:31:40 PM · #22
But it isn't possible. There isn't anything to be able to admit to, as what I posted is the actual physical reality of the situation. Like I posted a few comments back, white is produced when you mix all three light primaries. Black in that scheme is the absence of any of the colours.

You can mix the pigment primaries to get black, or you can fudge it and use red yellow and blue (again as was posted) but you are not ever going to mix them on a screen.

The colours that you are looking at on your monitor are formed by mixing red, green and blue, your eyes see in terms of red, green and blue. Its just how it is. Yellow is not a primary, other than an historical approximation.

This might clear some things up

For example, The square below is red and green, combined closely together to fool your eye.

' . substr('//www.healthy.net/rainbowstress/yellow.jpg', strrpos('//www.healthy.net/rainbowstress/yellow.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Message edited by author 2003-05-05 12:40:36.
05/05/2003 12:36:21 PM · #23
hey there

mixing all COLORS, ie colored light, gets you WHITE.

mixing all PIGMENTS, ie colored inks, gets you BLACK.

:)

Originally posted by OneSweetSin:

By the way did you know that black is acheived by mixing equal parts of those 3 primary colors? So hey would a photo taken with a lense cap still on the camera be all 3 of the primary colors?

05/05/2003 12:47:09 PM · #24
you people are all nuts.

:)
05/05/2003 01:09:46 PM · #25
Originally posted by magnetic9999:

hey there

mixing all COLORS, ie colored light, gets you WHITE.

mixing all PIGMENTS, ie colored inks, gets you BLACK. ]


But the colors must be PURE, and as someone posted above, and as I've found out in both scenic design and lighting design for theatre, it is impossible to get "pure" colors.

Wow, it's so much fun theorizing and debating the Primary colors, it's difficult to tear myself away from the computer to actually take some pictures!
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