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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Camera in plane Question
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Showing posts 1 - 19 of 19, (reverse)
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03/24/2005 08:53:50 AM · #1
Hi,
Theres something that sticks in my head... how do you guys take photos in a plane, just ask the attender to take so or take the photos without asking?
I once asked the attender and he said i could not take photos and we where already in the air where you could have electronic stuff turned on... last trip i took somebody was on a Laptop computer... so what's the problem in taking pictures in a plane?
Was the attender in a bad day or what?
Is it for security means?
Just let my little head come to rest please. :)
Give me your thoughts.
03/24/2005 08:59:14 AM · #2
Are you talking about taking photos out the window, or of the interior of the plane? I regularly shoot out the window, and have never had a problem.
I haven't often taken pics of the interior (a couple times when traveling with fimily/group) but have not had problems then either.
03/24/2005 09:01:13 AM · #3
I have never had a problem taking a photo in a plane, nor have I ever asked permission to do so.

Normally during take-off and landings, the stewardess will ask people to turn off any time of equipment that emits a signal, such as laptops and cell phones, but during normal flight time the use of such items is permissable.

I have seen instances during mid-flight where they have asked people to turn off equipment, but only for a short period of time... perhaps that is what happened in your case.

Hope this helps a little.

Ray
03/24/2005 09:06:15 AM · #4
The only time I've been asked to turn off a camera on a plane was during descent, when a flight attendant said ALL battery-operated devices must be off. I was going to point out the watch on the hand she was pointing at me, but thought better of it.
03/24/2005 09:07:54 AM · #5
Originally posted by scalvert:

The only time I've been asked to turn off a camera on a plane was during descent, when a flight attendant said ALL battery-operated devices must be off. I was going to point out the watch on the hand she was pointing at me, but thought better of it.


LOL! That sounds like something my husband would do. :-D
03/24/2005 09:14:08 AM · #6
Originally posted by kirbic:

Are you talking about taking photos out the window, or of the interior of the plane? I regularly shoot out the window, and have never had a problem.
I haven't often taken pics of the interior (a couple times when traveling with fimily/group) but have not had problems then either.


Inside or outside the window doesn't really matter...
03/24/2005 09:17:14 AM · #7
I have always been frustrated at the quality of the plastic inner-windows on planes that spoil what would be great pics. But I still try to get a few snaps in on any flight I take. Here's some I took of the Sahara, North African Coast and the western end of the Alps on my last long-haul flight
03/24/2005 09:34:34 AM · #8
BTW, few tips on photographing out aircraft windows...
First and foremost don't use a polarizer. Stresses in the plastic inner window will produce strong colored areas in your photos.
Second, shoot with the lens right up to the window, at a relatively large aperture, to minimize the effects of defects and dirt on the window.
Third, especially when shooting darker scenes, make sure you try to block as much light from inside the plane as possible to eliminate reflections back off the outer window. The large space between the inner and outer windows allows light from the sides to reflect back off the outer window and create nasty reflections that can outright ruin shots. The best solution is a black piece of cloth over the window with a hole the size of the lens. Lots of ways to achieve this if you plan ahead :)
03/24/2005 10:49:27 AM · #9
Originally posted by Bungler:

I have always been frustrated at the quality of the plastic inner-windows on planes that spoil what would be great pics. But I still try to get a few snaps in on any flight I take. Here's some I took of the Sahara, North African Coast and the western end of the Alps on my last long-haul flight


Damn, I was thinking to myself "Boy, he was HIGH when he shot that!" as I opened the link expecting a single picture with all these elements...

Robt.
03/24/2005 01:40:47 PM · #10
Shooting out a commercial airliner window can present a challenge, and as much as a polarizer is a great filter, it will only create problems and will give you all kind of pretty rainbows.

Decent images can be attained though:

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03/24/2005 01:45:11 PM · #11
I've taken a few photos inside the plane, and when descending to land in Hawai'i I took quite a few (and have some great shots) without any problems. I've never been asked to shut off the camera at any time, probably because I don't do that 2 mins. before landing or after take off.
03/24/2005 02:46:07 PM · #12
I always take pictures when traveling on a plane both of the stewardess if they´re cute and of the landscape below, never been asked not to take pictures.
here are a few samples..
football stadium in Frankfurt Germany
waterfall in Iceland
same waterfall different angle
03/24/2005 02:50:27 PM · #13
I haven't had much problem either. I think I've asked before and been told it's OK to operate a camera -- its interference-value is very low, more like some essential devices which can't be turned off anyway.

A very early photo, not long after I got my first digital camera:

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03/24/2005 03:22:53 PM · #14
Also best to sit as far forward as possible - the heat & wash from the jet engines creates a huge blurry effect, destroying all the detail (business class or 1st would be best...!). Otherwise, take advantage of the plane banking to get nice shots straight out of the window. A point & shoot is easy to "smuggle" into use, at any time. These are some of my favs:

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03/24/2005 03:32:54 PM · #15
Heh, never have worked out the "turn off all battery operated devices" rule. I mean, planes these days can get struck by lightning with no ill-effect, I can hardly see how my 300D will take the thing out of the sky.
03/24/2005 03:55:42 PM · #16
Originally posted by Discraft:

... how do you guys take photos in a plane ... ?
Give me your thoughts.


I've taken photos inside a plane in flight both with flash (747-400) and natural light (Concorde). Never asked permission and was never hassled about it. And I have taken countless photos out through the windows, again w/o permission or hassle.

I would respect the take-off and landing restrictions on battery operated devices. Not because they are likely to cause a problem with the plane, but because the violate attendant directives to refrain.

I am also a pilot and don't recall any FAR (US Federal Air Regs) prohibition of photography.

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Concorde over North Atlantic
Altitude: 57,500 Temp: -65C
Speed: Mach 2 (1,300 mph)
03/24/2005 04:11:12 PM · #17
Originally posted by DanSig:

I always take pictures when traveling on a plane both of the stewardess if they´re cute and of the landscape below, never been asked not to take pictures.

So where them stewardess pics at? ;)
03/24/2005 04:20:56 PM · #18
About eight years ago, I was traveling in Europe flying to Venice Italy. When we crossed the border into Italy, we were told that Italian government forbids unauthorized aerial photography. I think that when traveling internationally, it would be wise to know what each country’s rules are as I would guess there are other countries with similar prohibitions.

Dick
03/24/2005 07:12:21 PM · #19
Originally posted by dickwilhelm:

About eight years ago, I was traveling in Europe flying to Venice Italy. When we crossed the border into Italy, we were told that Italian government forbids unauthorized aerial photography. I think that when traveling internationally, it would be wise to know what each country’s rules are as I would guess there are other countries with similar prohibitions.

Dick


Hmm - they did not stop me for me for my pic of Venice. Taking pictures of planes from the outside, however - don't try that in Greece, as your hobby of planespotting does not go down well there (see, for example, Plane Spotters Arrested As Spies)
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