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DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Gas prices in your area?
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Showing posts 76 - 100 of 105, (reverse)
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03/20/2005 11:10:29 AM · #76
87.8/litre in toronto.. what's that, about 4x more per gallon.. you do the math.
03/20/2005 11:15:04 AM · #77
Originally posted by Judith Polakoff:

Another thing I'm curious about for non-U.S. folks is how much driving you do, on average, in a day. In the U.S., it's routine for people to drive several hours/many miles commuting to and from work.


In total (to and back) between 40 to 200 miles a day, but for me it's not commuting, just the mileage for the work itself (construction). A lot of time lost in traffic jams (= huge fuel comsumption), distances you could do in 20 minutes 'suddenly' take 60 for example.
Tax? Shell calculated that for every clean EUR 0.42 we put in our tank, you have to add EUR 0.87 tax. So, it is about 66% tax.
03/20/2005 11:18:32 AM · #78
Originally posted by soup:

if it were 5 times the money maybe more people would think about the fuel economy of their vehicles. maybe more devoted research would go into alternative sources of fuel. maybe the oil supply could be salvaged for more important things than scooting around from here to there for no particular reason.

sorry - i get sick of people complaining about fuel prices, and yet driving enormous vehicles like humvees, and SUV's. i get sick of the oil industry and government bickering over the price of a barrel for the mere fact of how much profit party A and B are going to pull. i


Ditto. Also all those driving their land bardges around are also tearing up the roads at a much quicker pace (more oil used in the construction & repair of asphalt) and also putting those of us who drive more environmentally friendly cars at risk due to the weight of their monsters and the high contact point.

And I think the insurance companies are in bed with the oil companies, because the cost of insuring hybrids is astronomical.
03/20/2005 11:32:30 AM · #79
Letís hear if for those of us who telecommute and donít drive any distance to work. With the Internet and cheap long distance phone rates I find I can do all my work from home, a good thing since I live a long ways from my clients.
03/20/2005 12:17:24 PM · #80
Originally posted by scottwilson:

Letís hear if for those of us who telecommute and donít drive any distance to work. With the Internet and cheap long distance phone rates I find I can do all my work from home, a good thing since I live a long ways from my clients.


At the risk of seeming to hijack this thread, I would like to say first off that telecommuting is a great idea for reducing energy consumption. One reason so many people drive such long distances to work is that they have no choice. In the past quarter-century a ridiculous number of jobs which used to be centrally located and easily accessible have been relocated to the ugly bauhaus monstrosities which desecrate remote former cornfields. There is little if any affordable housing within a reasonable distance of these depressing 'office parks' for the employees forced to commute there. Telecommuting would be ideal for these employees since most of what they do could be done over the internet. However, for management, the issue is not long commutes, quality of work, data security, etc., it is simply CONTROL. Alas, a lot of people will never have the opportunity to telecommute simply because corporate management just cannot stand the idea ao an employee out of their line of sight, seemingly out of their control. Of course, for some jobs management doesn't mind having employees telecommute from 12,000 miles away, but that's a whole other issue......
03/20/2005 01:09:52 PM · #81
My Jeep actually gets about 18 mpg. That's not bad considering it's got the aerodynamics of a brick. It's a 4-cyl and at the time, it was the best vehicle I could afford. It was an 03 left over in mid-04 (apparently no one around here likes yellow TJ's) so I got a really good price on a brand new vehicle.
03/20/2005 01:52:32 PM · #82
I'm from germany and the prices are:

diesel: 1,00 Ä /liter
92 octane: 1,08 Ä / liter
95 octane: 1,11 Ä / liter
98 octane: 1,13 Ä /liter

that's quite expensive at the moment.

before we had the euro here in europe, the prices were about half. but that has some more reasons than the new currency.

Message edited by author 2005-03-20 13:53:12.
03/20/2005 02:05:00 PM · #83
Dirt cheap here, like everywhere else in the US.

About $1.70 per gallon. I'm used to paying about $6
03/20/2005 02:05:50 PM · #84
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Message edited by author 2005-03-20 14:06:37.
03/20/2005 02:08:36 PM · #85
The solution is not cheaper gas, but replacing gasoline, fully or partially as a fuel for motor vehicles.

I'm not talking about hybrids that still burn gasoline.

It is entirely possibly with minor adjustments to runn just about any production car on Ethanol, made from corn that is grown in the US. Or an Ethanol blend.

Federal law limits the amount of Ethanol in motor fuel to 12%.

Of course if the US made the effort to switch to cheaper fuel and significantly reduce or eliminate the consumption of fossil fuels, the Oil companies would either have to invest in Ethanol production or suffer. They have too much clout to allow that to happen.

The existing oil company infrastructure (distribution, gas stations etc.) would support a switch to Ethanol, but it would not generate the income that a dwindling resource does.
03/20/2005 03:36:11 PM · #86
Originally posted by Judith Polakoff:

Another thing I'm curious about for non-U.S. folks is how much driving you do, on average, in a day. In the U.S., it's routine for people to drive several hours/many miles commuting to and from work.


I am assuming that when you refer to "Non U.S. folks" you are alluding primarily to Europeans, who were smart enough to build really great transit systems, and don't on average have the great distances to travel as we tend to do in North America.

As an example, if I want to get a coffee from say a "Tim Horton's" I only have to drive 6 miles for that pleasure. Going to work in the city, well that's a 40 miles minimum.

Ray
03/20/2005 03:41:58 PM · #87
Well its approx £3.28 a galon in the North West UK at the minute... 82p a litre and I am presuming that there is 4 litres to a gallon, sorry don't do imperial I work in metric so im unsure but if I do a conversion on that you guys in the US would be paying like $6.29 a gallon...

Some how I reckon you'd all be having smaller engined cars like us Brits eh!!!

As for how far I travel a day I think I do about 60 miles... but most of that is spent queueing in traffic

Message edited by author 2005-03-20 15:51:13.
03/20/2005 03:42:24 PM · #88
Originally posted by Mark of SRQ:

I paid $2.15 today for regular in Florida. I remember back in the day when it was 77 cents/gallon.


That low huh??? I hate to date myself, but I remember gas at $0.32 a gallon, and an imperial gallon at that.....

Mind you, I could also buy a hot hamburger with a large glass of milk for $0.85 and I seem to recall working in a grocery store for something like $0.50 an hour or was it a whole $1.00.

View in perspective, everything is relative.

Just a thought

Ray
03/20/2005 03:48:59 PM · #89
Around $6 here in Iceland
03/20/2005 03:55:10 PM · #90
$2.20 here in NYC. How will the end of the War in Iraq affect Gas prices worldwide? I think they will decrease dramatically. I can't beleive how much Europeans pay for their Gas!!!! I have no right to complain
03/20/2005 04:41:17 PM · #91
I paid $2.55/gallon for premium at a Mobil station.

I'm just glad I drive a relatively economical car, 26 mpg city -- and still have 200 hr at 6900 rpm. I don't know how people driving around in, say, the H2 (at 9 mpg highway) do it.
03/20/2005 05:09:01 PM · #92
Here in BC Canada we pay $3.11 a US gallon with home delivery out in the sticks. It is 89.9 per litre in town. This is for regular.
03/25/2005 12:04:55 PM · #93
Originally posted by orussell:

Originally posted by zeuszen:

0.95 CDN $ in Vancouver, BC, today.


Around the same as here. Must be something about being on a coast that makes it more expensive. To add insult to injury, Newfoundland and Labrador and British Columbia are both oil producing provinces.


I am in Labrador and it is $1.06 a liter here for Regular

Melissa
03/25/2005 12:22:40 PM · #94
well i'm glad a couple people see it my way.

and - if, for the sake of argument, i was the CEO of one of the oil companies, wouldn't it be logical for me to instigate a R&D dept for alternative fuels given that there is proven a limited supply of oil. doing so would put my company ahead of the game in the patent race, show our companies respect for the earth, our proactive metality, and secure a profitable future for the company when ( A- oil becomes WAY to expensive to be profitable to market or B- be two steps ahead of the competition when alternative fuel sources are imperitive )?

rather though i am going to retire in a couple years, and the value of my stock investments are rather important to my being able to keep my current high standard of living after retirement ( i mean i can't shit on anything but a platinum toilet seat ). so i'll bag that research idea in hopes my investment will grow further before i retire, rather than take the risk of losing some money, but bettering the world.
this way i am better able to show growth on paper, lessen the load of complaints i hear, maintain my standard of living, and basically just continue doing what i already do, which at this point in my life is pretty damn routine....

damn - that was a crazy dream...


03/25/2005 12:26:45 PM · #95
Originally posted by Spazmo99:

The solution is not cheaper gas, but replacing gasoline, fully or partially as a fuel for motor vehicles.

I'm not talking about hybrids that still burn gasoline.

It is entirely possibly with minor adjustments to runn just about any production car on Ethanol, made from corn that is grown in the US. Or an Ethanol blend.

Federal law limits the amount of Ethanol in motor fuel to 12%.

Of course if the US made the effort to switch to cheaper fuel and significantly reduce or eliminate the consumption of fossil fuels, the Oil companies would either have to invest in Ethanol production or suffer. They have too much clout to allow that to happen.

The existing oil company infrastructure (distribution, gas stations etc.) would support a switch to Ethanol, but it would not generate the income that a dwindling resource does.


Burning Ethanol still pollutes. Also you must consider that what petroleum oil is replaced must be grown. Where are you going to get all the arable land to grow that much corn on? How many aquifers will you deplete? Ethanol and bio-diesel are NOT long term solutions. They can help, but what would help more than alternative IC fuels and more drilling is conservation and higher efficiency engines.
03/25/2005 01:29:02 PM · #96
I was in Palmdale on Sunday and 91 octane was CHEAPER there than in the South Bay area. I believe it was $2.50 in Palmdale and $2.60-something in Torrance.
03/25/2005 01:40:23 PM · #97
When I first became aware of gasoline prices, I lived in the Northwest US and had just got my drivers license.

I made $1.15 per hour at a drive in restaurant, which sold hamburgers for $0.15 each and gas was $.36 per 92 octane US gallon with occasional price wars driving it down to $0.23. Using CPI data, $0.36 then is equivelent to $2.04 today. So in real terms, the price of gasoline, now $2.47 for 92 octane in the Pacific Northwest, has risen 21% over 35 years. And in the US, it's dirt cheap compared to many many other parts of the world.

The real story that isn't getting much play is that the world has fundamentally changed since then. China and Asia have developed an unquenchable thirst for gasoline which is outstripping supply of both production and refining. Without draconian conservation measures, or substantial increases to both production of oil and its refining, we will see the price of petroleum-based energy climb much faster than CPI for the rest of our lives.

So, I agree, it's time to do something about our dependance on oil!
03/25/2005 02:50:25 PM · #98
Gas prices here are R$ 2.61/ liter, which translates to about US $ 3.58/ gallon...
03/25/2005 03:04:55 PM · #99
here in chicagoland its about 2.10-2.40 or more in the city. We still do have the cheapest gas in the world, and it's still being sold for lower than it should cost. If gas were priced accurately here in the states it would be at about 4.00$ to 4.50$ a gallon, to cover actual costs.
03/25/2005 03:30:53 PM · #100
If you are interested in renewable fuels check this company out. Intrepid Technology
I have had some of there stock for a few years. It hasn't made me any money but at least someone is trying. I feel better owning it, I guess it offsets the fact that I own some GE stock as well :)
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