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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> What type of filter?
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03/22/2003 08:56:26 PM · #1
Ok going back in time to Photography 101 and using filters with a 35mm camera if you are getting strong yellow tones from artifical lighting, but were in a situation where there you couldn't use a flash or other lighting what kind of filter helps with the harsh yellow tones? I can't believe I can't remember this! But then it isn't everyday where the yellow tones is an issue either.
03/22/2003 10:38:10 PM · #2
Originally posted by OneSweetSin:

Ok going back in time to Photography 101 and using filters with a 35mm camera if you are getting strong yellow tones from artifical lighting, but were in a situation where there you couldn't use a flash or other lighting what kind of filter helps with the harsh yellow tones? I can't believe I can't remember this! But then it isn't everyday where the yellow tones is an issue either.


Well, it depends on the artificial light, tiffen makes a series of color conversion filters that have a blue cast to them like the 80B, these are good for cutting down the yellow cast when using daylight film.
03/22/2003 10:38:44 PM · #3
Check these sites
//users.pandora.be/martin.brown/home/nonad/nonad.htm
//www.schneideroptics.com/filters/filters_for_still_photography/black_&_white/
//members.evansville.net/slk/filters.htm
03/22/2003 10:39:42 PM · #4
light blue 080
03/23/2003 04:00:50 AM · #5
With a digital camera in most situations you don't need any filters really - you just have to set your white balance to tungsten - it will solve the problem of hash yellow tint. If it is an unusual colour cast and you have time, set your WB manually by shooting white or grey card.

If you are set on acquiring filters, buy a set of blue 80 series (A, B, C, D) - you would need different strengths for different light situations.

You can further correct casts in Photoshop by using Levels or Curves. Digitals do not like mixed light eg. daylight and tungsten together, so they may fail to balance it. In this case go to Hue/Saturation, instead of Master choose Yellows and adjust the saturation slider.
03/23/2003 08:59:47 AM · #6
Originally posted by Galina:

With a digital camera in most situations you don't need any filters really - you just have to set your white balance to tungsten - it will solve the problem of hash yellow tint. If it is an unusual colour cast and you have time, set your WB manually by shooting white or grey card.

If you are set on acquiring filters, buy a set of blue 80 series (A, B, C, D) - you would need different strengths for different light situations.

You can further correct casts in Photoshop by using Levels or Curves. Digitals do not like mixed light eg. daylight and tungsten together, so they may fail to balance it. In this case go to Hue/Saturation, instead of Master choose Yellows and adjust the saturation slider.


This wasn't for a digital camera it is for a 35mm and it had been so long since I used filters I couldn't remember what to use.
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