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01/20/2005 05:05:11 AM · #1
Very harrowing article, not for the faint of heart.

//www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,3604,1394152,00.html

Message edited by author 2005-01-20 05:05:19.
01/20/2005 05:24:42 AM · #2
I hope something like this will never ever happen again. I can understand that he never raised a camera to his eye again....

Bettina
01/20/2005 05:26:42 AM · #3
Originally posted by BobsterLobster:

Very harrowing article, not for the faint of heart.

//www.guardian.co.uk/g2/story/0,3604,1394152,00.html


It puts our concerns of "Candid" and "Faceless" to shame....
01/20/2005 05:41:06 AM · #4
See they even edited their pictures in 1940.

Around a dozen prisoners, mainly Polish, were put to work - some with professional skills as photographers, darkroom technicians, retouchers...

Must be quite hard to photograph in those kinds of situations. I have often said I would like to shoot a famine or a war, but don't think I would be mentally strong enough.

01/20/2005 05:45:49 AM · #5
Yeah, I wouldn't mind a stab at covering a war, but I draw the line at concentration camps and medical 'experiments'.
01/20/2005 06:11:42 AM · #6
A very disturbing reality...

At times I have thought I might like to shoot a war, or similar event, but then it's so much easier to shoot people who don't want to shoot back!

I have a good friend who I worked with freelancing in the early 90's who went through a messy divorce about 5 years ago... He stuck with photography as a career when I got a real job, and was doing pretty well in the studio and doing fashion work. He decided to take up photojournalism in 'hot spots' after the divorce, almost as a kind of aversion therapy I think.

He's spent the last four years in lovely scenic places like Siera Leone and Iraq. He's been mugged four of five times, and in one case lost everything, his clothes included!

He got shot at in Iraq, and was near one of the car bombs that went off in Bazra. He then had to come home to have surgery on his ear after the shockwave ruptured his ear drums. He's only been home since around November, and is already itching to go back... Not for me.

Cheers, Chris H.
ed: Typo

Message edited by author 2005-01-20 07:10:18.
01/20/2005 07:00:48 AM · #7
And Prince Harry walks around in 'his' nazi uniform, poor judgement at least.
01/20/2005 07:02:28 AM · #8
Originally posted by BobsterLobster:

Yeah, I wouldn't mind a stab at covering a war, but I draw the line at concentration camps and medical 'experiments'.


Yes me too. Must have been awful.

01/20/2005 07:28:50 AM · #9
Originally posted by gibun:

And Prince Harry walks around in 'his' nazi uniform, poor judgement at least.


I can't understand the people in the media who say the public should let this lie, as he's just young and foolish. I don't think this is excusable, especially for a man in his position. And about to undergo military training. I think he gets it from his grandfather! Just sack the whole load of them.
01/20/2005 07:49:18 AM · #10
Amazing. Wonderful that he thought enough to save pictures to help show the evil that was happening all around him. He must re-live that hell everyday. Hats off to a very couragous man!
01/20/2005 07:55:55 AM · #11
thanks for posting this up, bob. on one hand, you can't afford to forget. on the other, it makes celebrating the truly good things all that more important.
01/20/2005 08:03:29 AM · #12
Originally posted by jonpink:

Originally posted by BobsterLobster:

Yeah, I wouldn't mind a stab at covering a war, but I draw the line at concentration camps and medical 'experiments'.

Yes me too. Must have been awful.

I'm affaid we cannot even get to imagine about how dreadful it should have been from our warm and confortable homes in our days... For those who haven't already, have a look at "Life is beatiful" (La vita e bella) and put yourself in the character's shoes.
To me it's the best non-war approach to the situation to get to the feelings common people got.

01/20/2005 08:13:07 AM · #13
Thanks for posting this.
01/20/2005 08:40:36 AM · #14
Originally posted by Winterberg:

I hope something like this will never ever happen again. I can understand that he never raised a camera to his eye again....

Bettina


It's terrible and unfortunate, but similar tragic events have happened in the world since the 1940's and as recently as a few years ago. Not quite to the scale of the Nazi Death camps, but similar attrocities have occurred.

Of course, most of us never heard about it because it didn't happen to Western Europeans or Caucasians just to Africans, Arabs and Asians. Of course, the scale was a bit different too, there wasn't a massive World War going on.

Here's a few key words to look up through Google, at your leisure, these should pull up a mess of similar human tragedies that are considered acts of war crimes, even if some or most of those acts were committed within the borders of one nation to the people of that nation:

Pol Pot

Iraq under Sadam Hussein

The Balkan Conflict

Ehtiopia, during their famine in the 80's

The Republic of Congo civil war

Sierra Leone

United States and the Native Americans

Rwanda

There are some sick people in the human race that sometimes get into power and enact some terrible policies or commit terrible acts against other people, for what most civilized people would consider extremely stupid reasons; like they have different shaped noses then we do, or they worship a different god then we do, or we just don't like the food they eat.
01/20/2005 09:15:31 AM · #15
Originally posted by Nelzie:

Originally posted by Winterberg:

I hope something like this will never ever happen again. I can understand that he never raised a camera to his eye again....

Bettina


It's terrible and unfortunate, but similar tragic events have happened in the world since the 1940's and as recently as a few years ago. Not quite to the scale of the Nazi Death camps, but similar attrocities have occurred.

Of course, most of us never heard about it because it didn't happen to Western Europeans or Caucasians just to Africans, Arabs and Asians. Of course, the scale was a bit different too, there wasn't a massive World War going on.

Here's a few key words to look up through Google, at your leisure, these should pull up a mess of similar human tragedies that are considered acts of war crimes, even if some or most of those acts were committed within the borders of one nation to the people of that nation:

Pol Pot



I have a friend who surrvived that. Her and her family were rescued when the Vietnamese inavded to oust the Khmer Rouge. She was a baby when they left Cambodia so she doesn't remember, but when the subject or most anything anbout Cambodia is brought up her father stops talking and starts to cry.

He is taking his whole family back to visit next winter. I may go with them to document the return.
01/20/2005 12:15:30 PM · #16
that was a difficult article to read.

thank you for sharing. although it is difficult to read these things, it is of significant importance.
01/21/2005 07:29:07 AM · #17
Originally posted by nsbca7:

Originally posted by Nelzie:


It's terrible and unfortunate, but similar tragic events have happened in the world since the 1940's and as recently as a few years ago. Not quite to the scale of the Nazi Death camps, but similar attrocities have occurred.

Of course, most of us never heard about it because it didn't happen to Western Europeans or Caucasians just to Africans, Arabs and Asians. Of course, the scale was a bit different too, there wasn't a massive World War going on.

Here's a few key words to look up through Google, at your leisure, these should pull up a mess of similar human tragedies that are considered acts of war crimes, even if some or most of those acts were committed within the borders of one nation to the people of that nation:

Pol Pot



I have a friend who surrvived that. Her and her family were rescued when the Vietnamese inavded to oust the Khmer Rouge. She was a baby when they left Cambodia so she doesn't remember, but when the subject or most anything anbout Cambodia is brought up her father stops talking and starts to cry.

He is taking his whole family back to visit next winter. I may go with them to document the return.


Back when I was in High School, they taught us just a tiny bit about what happened in that nation. They didn't get into the depths of Pol Pot, his 'motivations' and the results of his activities.

It wasn't until about a year ago that I read a few pieces on it. I was simply blown away with what had happened in that country. It is simply unbelievable that it was possible for Pol Pot to do what he did.
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