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DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> What does juxtaposition mean?
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01/19/2005 04:58:13 AM · #1
I can not find the meaning of the word " juxtaposition ".
Who can explain it for me?

Harm

[edit:typo]

Message edited by author 2005-01-19 04:59:39.
01/19/2005 05:01:11 AM · #2
It refers to the state of something being adjacent to something else. To juxtapose things is to place them side by side, either literally or figuratively.
01/19/2005 05:07:04 AM · #3
juxtaposition

n 1: the act of positioning close together (or side by side); "it is the result of the juxtaposition of contrasting colors" [syn: apposition, collocation] 2: a side-by-side position

juxtapose

To place side by side, especially for comparison or contrast
01/19/2005 05:18:46 AM · #4
Look it up the easy way here.

dictionary.com
01/19/2005 05:19:48 AM · #5
We sometimes talk about the juxtaposition of the moon and the stars (being just right). Juxta (next to) pose (to place)

Related words include: EXPOSE--to show (place out) Exposition--such as the 1890 Paris Exposition.
INTERPOSE--(place between) POSE--to place or arrange something or someone POSITION--the place of something in relation to something else.
COMPOSE--(place together) Composition--such as a musical piece or a piece of writing (essay)
IMPOSE--(place upon)
IMPOSITION--Your sister-in-law drops the kids off for the weekend so she can go skiing.

(Can't sleep. Love to play with words. Hope this helps.)
01/19/2005 09:38:38 AM · #6

Just know that "juxtapose" isn't a word to fill in for "next to", not even a synonym in my book. It has more to do with ironic contrast than with physical placement. If ya get my drift.
01/19/2005 10:44:09 AM · #7
Originally posted by kdkaboom:

Just know that "juxtapose" isn't a word to fill in for "next to", not even a synonym in my book. It has more to do with ironic contrast than with physical placement. If ya get my drift.


True, it is not a fill in for "next to." Because it includes the element "pose" it carries the meaning that things are intentionally placed in relationship to each other. It can carry the deeper meaning of "ironic contrast" as you say--but really, it doesn't necessarily mean that.

Here's something I found on the web:

juxtaposition:
The placing of one concept or object next to another, often for purposes of comparison.
The verb is "juxtapose." To juxtapose is to "place or set or put side by side, place parallel, place near, bring near; compare, put alongside; pair, partner, match, collocate." (From Rodale's The Synonym Finder, 1978 Edition, p. 621.)

The above is from //www.csudh.edu/dearhabermas/vocabindx.htm

(Edit to fix hyperlink.)

Message edited by author 2005-01-19 10:45:50.
01/19/2005 11:21:08 AM · #8
Originally posted by KaDi:

True, it is not a fill in for "next to." Because it includes the element "pose" it carries the meaning that things are intentionally placed in relationship to each other. It can carry the deeper meaning of "ironic contrast" as you say--but really, it doesn't necessarily mean that.


Oh yes, absolutely... I agree, though I never use the word lightly. I've been ripped into for using juxtapose in the wrong way :)

I used "ironic contrast" to mean that the placement (of concepts, objects, etc) is not arbitrary, and usually the contrast is to point out a much deeper meaning then, say, one black object, one white object. Maybe I should have said "profound" instead of "ironic"? :)

01/19/2005 11:23:47 AM · #9

Ha! I just realized why this question was posed...didn't even check out the new challenge! Not so profound, that...

01/19/2005 11:40:16 AM · #10
Originally posted by kdkaboom:

Ha! I just realized why this question was posed...didn't even check out the new challenge! Not so profound, that...


Profound, yes, I think that's a better word. And why discount the context of the discussion? I think you make a valid point--juxtapose doesn't just mean throw 2 things together--it carries the more "profound" meaning of arrangement or placement for a purpose. It's just the type of extra thought behind the image that might separate the 5's from the 10's in this challenge.
01/20/2005 10:02:05 PM · #11
to place two or more things together, especially in order to suggest a link between them or emphasize the contrast between them

Encarta® World English Dictionary © & (P) 1999,2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Developed for Microsoft by Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.
01/20/2005 10:04:53 PM · #12
Just imagine how wide open it would be if the criteria of old and new were not imposed on the challenge??
01/20/2005 10:09:05 PM · #13
Didn't we have a challenge similar to this already?
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